3

Say I have a String, how do I determine the number of words in it? I'm trying to create an extension like:

extension String {
    var numberOfWords: Int {
        // Insert string-counting code here
    }
}

2 Answers 2

21

If you search "word count string swift" you'll find dozens of StackOverflow answers and gists that tell you to split the string using str.components(separatedBy: " ").count.

DON'T USE components(separatedBy:)!!!

Many non-European languages (particularly East Asian languages) don't use spaces to split words. This will also incorrectly count hyphenated words as separate, and lone punctuation as a word.

The most correct AND most performant way to solve this problem is to use either enumerateSubstrings(in:options:) or CFStringTokenizer.

// enumerateSubstrings
extension String {
    var numberOfWords: Int {
        var count = 0
        let range = startIndex..<endIndex
        enumerateSubstrings(in: range, options: [.byWords, .substringNotRequired, .localized], { _, _, _, _ -> () in
            count += 1
        })
        return count
    }
}

OR:

// CFStringTokenizer
extension String {
    var numberOfWords: Int {
        let inputRange = CFRangeMake(0, utf16.count)
        let flag = UInt(kCFStringTokenizerUnitWord)
        let locale = CFLocaleCopyCurrent()
        let tokenizer = CFStringTokenizerCreate(kCFAllocatorDefault, self as CFString, inputRange, flag, locale)
        var tokenType = CFStringTokenizerAdvanceToNextToken(tokenizer)
        var count = 0
        
        while tokenType != [] {
            count += 1
            tokenType = CFStringTokenizerAdvanceToNextToken(tokenizer)
        }
        return count
    }
}

Both are very performant, but enumerateSubtrings(in:options:...) is about twice as fast.

Shocked that nobody is pointing this out elsewhere, so I hope people searching for a solution find this.

1
  • 4
    In your first example (the one with // enumerateStrings) the line "let range = Range(startIndex..<endIndex)" gives a compile error in Xcode (certainly in Xcode 10.2.1, Swift 5). The line should instead be "let range = startIndex..<endIndex".
    – gepree
    May 29, 2019 at 18:55
-1

Count of words in a string

Create an extension of String

extension String{
    var wordCount:Int{
        let chararacter = CharacterSet.whitespacesAndNewlines.union(.punctuationCharacters)
        let comps = components(separatedBy: chararacter)
        let words = comps.filter { !$0.isEmpty }
        return words.count
    }
}

How to use

"This is a test string".wordCount // Result: 5
1
  • As mentioned in the most upvoted answer, doing this is both incredibly fragile (breaks on most non-latin locales) and slow. Use the proper word separation methods.
    – Frizlab
    Dec 27, 2023 at 16:45

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