3

I have a java.util.LinkedList containing data logically like

1 > 2 > 3 > 4 > 5 > null

and I want to remove elements from 2 to 4 and make the LinkedList like this

1 > 5 > null

In reality we should be able to achieve this in O(n) complexity considering you have to break chain at 2 and connect it to 5 in just a single operation.

In Java LinkedList I am not able to find any function which lets remove chains from linkedlist using from and to in a single O(n) operation.

It only provides me an option to remove the elements individually (Making each operation O(n)).

Is there anyway I can achieve this in just a single operation (Without writing my own List)?

One solution provided here solves the problem using single line of code, but not in single operation. list.subList(1, 4).clear();

The question was more on algorithmic and performance. When I checked the performance, this is actually slower than removing the element one by one. I am guessing this solution do not actually remove an entire sublist in o(n) but doing that one by one for each element (each removal of O(n)). Also adding extra computation to take the sublist.

Average of 1000000 computations in ms:

Without sublist = 1414
With the provided sublist solution : = 1846**

6

The way to do it in one step is

list.subList(1, 4).clear();

as documented in the Javadoc for java.util.LinkedList#subList(int, int).

Having checked the source code, I see that this ends up removing the elements one at a time. subList is inherited from AbstractList. This implementation returns a List that simply calls removeRange on the backing list when you invoke clear on it. removeRange is also inherited from AbstractList and the implementation is

protected void removeRange(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
    ListIterator<E> it = listIterator(fromIndex);
    for (int i=0, n=toIndex-fromIndex; i<n; i++) {
        it.next();
        it.remove();
    }
}

As you can see, this removes the elements one at a time. listIterator is overridden in LinkedList, and it starts by finding the first node by following chains either by following links from the start of the list or the end (depending on whether fromIndex is in the first or second half of the list). This means that list.subList(i, j).clear() has time complexity

O(j - i + min(i, list.size() - i)).

Apart from the case when the you are better off starting from the end and removing the elements in reverse order, I am not convinced there is a solution that is noticeably faster. Testing the performance of code is not easy, and it is easy to be drawn to false conclusions.

There is no way of using the public API of the LinkedList class to remove all the elements in the middle in one go. This surprised me, as about the only reason for using a LinkedList rather than an ArrayList is that you are supposed to be able to insert and remove elements from the middle efficiently, so I thought this case worth optimising (especially as it's so easy to write).

If you absolutely need the O(1) performance that you should be able to get from a call such as

list.subList(1, list.size() - 1)).clear();

you will either have to write your own implementation or do something fragile and unwise with reflection like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    LinkedList<Integer> list = new LinkedList<>();
    for (int a = 0; a < 5; a++)
        list.add(a);
    removeRange_NEVER_DO_THIS(list, 2, 4);
    System.out.println(list);       // [0, 1, 4]
}

public static void removeRange_NEVER_DO_THIS(LinkedList<?> list, int from, int to) {
    try {
        Method node = LinkedList.class.getDeclaredMethod("node", int.class);
        node.setAccessible(true);
        Object low = node.invoke(list, from - 1);
        Object hi = node.invoke(list, to);
        Class<?> clazz = low.getClass();
        Field nextNode = clazz.getDeclaredField("next");
        Field prevNode = clazz.getDeclaredField("prev");
        nextNode.setAccessible(true);
        prevNode.setAccessible(true);
        nextNode.set(low, hi);
        prevNode.set(hi, low);
        Field size = LinkedList.class.getDeclaredField("size");
        size.setAccessible(true);
        size.set(list, list.size() - to + from);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}
  • Thank you for the solution. This solves this in one step but the question was more on algorithmic and performance. When I checked the performance, this is actually slower than removing the element one by one. I am guessing this solution do not actually remove an entire sublist in o(n) but doing that one by one (each O(n)). Also adding extra computation to take the sublist. ** Average of 1000000 computations in ms: Without sublist = 1414 With the provided sublist solution : = 1846** – Nithin Devang Oct 29 '17 at 7:19
  • @NithinDevang I've updated my answer – cpp beginner Oct 29 '17 at 17:34
  • 1
    Note that the new, reflective answer will probably break if you end up removing the head or last. Also, It probably counts as a library bug that LinkedList is inefficient in removeRange (which is what this answer uses underneath). – HTNW Oct 29 '17 at 18:15
  • Yes, I’m not sure why I included that code using reflection. It’s a really terrible idea. – cpp beginner Oct 29 '17 at 18:18
  • 1
    Thank you for the update. I submitted feature request to Java. – Nithin Devang Oct 29 '17 at 19:47
1

To remove the middle elements in a single operation (method call) you could subclass java.util.LinkedList and then expose a call to List.removeRange(int, int):

list.removeRange(1, 4);

(Credit to the person who posted this answer then removed it. :)) However, even this method calls ListIterator.remove() n times.

I do not believe there is a way to remove n consecutive entries from a java.util.LinkedList without performing n operations under the hood.

In general removing n consecutive items from any linked list seems to require O(n) operations as one must traverse from the start index to the end index one item at a time - inherently - in order to find the next list entry in the modified list.

  • 1
    It was removed because it’s a protected method – cpp beginner Oct 29 '17 at 14:15
  • Acknowledged and corrected. Thanks, @cpp-beginner! – Mark A. Fitzgerald Oct 29 '17 at 14:18

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