We all know that the common way of executing a statement a certain number of times in Python is to use a for loop.

The general way of doing this is,

# I am assuming iterated list is redundant.
# Just the number of execution matters.
for _ in range(count):
    pass

I believe nobody will argue that the code above is the common implementation, however there is another option. Using the speed of Python list creation by multiplying references.

# Uncommon way.
for _ in [0] * count:
    pass

There is also the old while way.

i = 0
while i < count:
    i += 1

I tested the execution times of these approaches. Here is the code.

import timeit

repeat = 10
total = 10

setup = """
count = 100000
"""

test1 = """
for _ in range(count):
    pass
"""

test2 = """
for _ in [0] * count:
    pass
"""

test3 = """
i = 0
while i < count:
    i += 1
"""

print(min(timeit.Timer(test1, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))
print(min(timeit.Timer(test2, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))
print(min(timeit.Timer(test3, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))

# Results
0.02238852552017738
0.011760978361696095
0.06971727824807639

I would not initiate the subject if there was a small difference, however it can be seen that the difference of speed is 100%. Why does not Python encourage such usage if the second method is much more efficient? Is there a better way?

The test is done with Windows 10 and Python 3.6.

Following @Tim Peters' suggestion,

.
.
.
test4 = """
for _ in itertools.repeat(None, count):
    pass
"""
print(min(timeit.Timer(test1, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))
print(min(timeit.Timer(test2, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))
print(min(timeit.Timer(test3, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))
print(min(timeit.Timer(test4, setup=setup).repeat(repeat, total)))

# Gives
0.02306803115612352
0.013021619340942758
0.06400113461638746
0.008105080015739174

Which offers a much better way, and this pretty much answers my question.

Why is this faster than range, since both are generators. Is it because the value never changes?

  • 8
    One more to try: for _ in itertools.repeat(None, count). – Tim Peters Oct 29 '17 at 2:32
  • 8
    A major problem with the second method is that it allocates storage for the entire throw-away list. – Tom Karzes Oct 29 '17 at 2:34
  • 9
    But in practical code the body of the loop will be more complex, and dominate the over all timing. If the iteration variable is unimportant you are just spinning wheels. – hpaulj Oct 29 '17 at 7:17
  • 3
    @MaxPythone Could you give an example? I find it hard to believe :) (not that I'm an expert though :) ) – Ant Oct 29 '17 at 13:14
  • 3
    @MaxPythone Thank for you answer, but I am still confused. For the fist example, I would think that what dominates the execution is obtaining / saving / checking the video frames you're trying to obtain. Or if you can start directly from a certain frame, no point in running an empty loop. Also for the other example; whatever algorithm you use to benchmark, it will be dominated by what you do in the loop, and not by how you increase the 32 bit counter in the for loop – Ant Oct 29 '17 at 15:42
up vote 83 down vote accepted

Using

for _ in itertools.repeat(None, count)
    do something

is the non-obvious way of getting the best of all worlds: tiny constant space requirement, and no new objects created per iteration. Under the covers, the C code for repeat uses a native C integer type (not a Python integer object!) to keep track of the count remaining.

For that reason, the count needs to fit in the platform C ssize_t type, which is generally at most 2**31 - 1 on a 32-bit box, and here on a 64-bit box:

>>> itertools.repeat(None, 2**63)
Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
OverflowError: Python int too large to convert to C ssize_t

>>> itertools.repeat(None, 2**63-1)
repeat(None, 9223372036854775807)

Which is plenty big for my loops ;-)

  • Thanks again, if I were to search the source code of these implementations, where can I find them (this and similar standard library functions) ? – Max Paython Oct 29 '17 at 2:54
  • 3
    That's quite a learning curve! The source for itertools is at github.com/python/cpython/blob/master/Modules/itertoolsmodule.c, and the implementation of repeat spans several distinct functions near repeat_new. How do I know this? Because I've played with Python's source code for 25 years ;-) – Tim Peters Oct 29 '17 at 2:58
  • 1
    Well I already knew you took part in the Python project, so I wanted to extract as much as information while you were here :) Your help is appreciated. – Max Paython Oct 29 '17 at 3:03
  • @TimPeters Are you proud of creating this intractable language? – Beginner Jan 18 at 19:01
  • 1
    @Beginner, I didn't create Python, but still use it every day, and - yes - believe its creator (Guido van Rossum) has every reason to be proud of it. – Tim Peters Jan 18 at 21:31

The first method (in Python 3) creates a range object, which can iterate through the range of values. (It's like a generator object but you can iterate through it several times.) It doesn't take up much memory because it doesn't contain the entire range of values, just a current and a maximum value, where it keeps increasing by the step size (default 1) until it hits or passes the maximum.

Compare the size of range(0, 1000) to the size of list(range(0, 1000)): Try It Online!. The former is very memory efficient; it only takes 48 bytes regardless of the size, whereas the entire list increases linearly in terms of size.

The second method, although faster, takes up that memory I was talking about in the past one. (Also, it seems that although 0 takes up 24 bytes and None takes 16, arrays of 10000 of each have the same size. Interesting. Probably because they're pointers)

Interestingly enough, [0] * 10000 is smaller than list(range(10000)) by about 10000, which kind of makes sense because in the first one, everything is the same primitive value so it can be optimized.

The third one is also nice because it doesn't require another stack value (whereas calling range requires another spot on the call stack), though since it's 6 times slower, it's not worth that.

The last one might be the fastest just because itertools is cool that way :P I think it uses some C-library optimizations, if I remember correctly.

  • range returns a range object in Python 3, not a generator. One specific quality that demonstrates this is that you can iterate over it multiple times, whereas generators are consumed (and therefore empty) once iterated over. – jpmc26 Nov 2 '17 at 1:36
  • @jpmc26 Ah yes, thank you for correcting me :) – HyperNeutrino Nov 2 '17 at 2:02

The first two methods need to allocate memory blocks for each iteration while the third one would just make a step for each iteration.

Range is a slow function, and I use it only when I have to run small code that doesn't require speed, for example, range(0,50). I think you can't compare the three methods; they are totally different.

According to a comment below, the first case is only valid for Python 2.7, in Python 3 it works like xrange and doesn't allocate a block for each iteration. I tested it, and he is right.

  • 6
    Incorrect. IN Python 3, range produces an iterator. It is equivalent to Python 2's xrange. Only the second method has the memory problem. – Tom Karzes Oct 29 '17 at 2:39
  • @TomKarzes Still incorrect (though more correct). It produces a range object. A range object is not an iterator or generator; it can be iterated over multiple times without being consumed. – jpmc26 Nov 2 '17 at 1:37

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