I'm trying to learn python and came across some code that is nice and short but doesn't totally make sense

the context was:

def fn(*args):
    return len(args) and max(args)-min(args)

I get what it's doing, but why does python do this - ie return the value rather than True/False?

10 and 7-2

returns 5. Similarly, changing the and to or will result in a change in functionality. So

10 or 7 - 2

Would return 10.

Is this legit/reliable style, or are there any gotchas on this?

  • and (as well as or) is not restricted to working with, or returning boolean values. – coldspeed Oct 30 '17 at 3:25
  • 1
    IMNSHO: that's a somewhat confusing way of writing that; I can't tell offhand if it's supposed to return a boolean (is there a distinct min and max) or a number (what is the difference of the min and max). If the latter, then there's also the question if it makes any sense to give that difference of a zero-length list as a number. (Instead of None or an exception) – ilkkachu Oct 30 '17 at 9:21
  • 6
    It works, as other people have explained, however one possible issue is that if it returns 0 you can't tell whether args was empty or was nonempty but had all elements equal. – Especially Lime Oct 30 '17 at 9:52
  • @EspeciallyLime: exactly. I've mentioned it in my answer. – Eric Duminil Oct 30 '17 at 15:12
  • 1
    @vaultah Swing that hammer! Or, mark that a duplicate of this. – coldspeed Oct 30 '17 at 17:07
up vote 76 down vote accepted

TL;DR

Logical AND (and):

Return the first Falsey value if there are any, else return the last value in the expression.

Logical OR (or):

Return the first Truthy value if there are any, else return the last value in the expression.


return len(args) and max(args) - min(args)

Is a very pythonic concise way of saying:

if args is not empty, return the result of max(args) - min(args).

The logical and and or operators are not restricted to working with, or returning boolean values. Any object with a truthiness value can be tested here. This includes int, str, list, dict, tuple, set, NoneType, and user defined objects. Short circuiting rules still apply as well.

Note that this is a more concise way of constructing an if-else expression:

return exp1 and exp2

Should (roughly) translate to:

r1 = exp1
if not r1:
    return r1

return exp2

Here's some examples of how and where these constructs can be used to concisely handle invalid input.

Example with and (as shown by OP)

Return the difference between the min and max of a group of arguments.

def foo(*args):
     return len(args) and max(args) - min(args)

foo(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
4

foo()
0

Since and is used, the second expression must also be evaluated if the first is True. Note that, if the first expression is evaluated to be Truthy, the result returned is always the result of the second expression.

If the first expression is evaluated to be Falsey, then the result returned is the result of the first expression.

If foo receives any arguments, len(args) is greater than 0 (a positive number), so the result returned is max(args) - min(args).

If foo does not receive arguments, len(args) is 0 which is Falsey, and 0 is returned.

Note that an alternative way to write this function would be:

def foo(*args):
    if not len(args):
        return 0

    return max(args) - min(args)

Example with or

Return all numbers over 9000.

def foo(*args):
     return [x for x in args if x > 9000] or 'No number over 9000!'

foo(9004, 1, 2, 500)
[9004]

foo(1, 2, 3, 4)
'No number over 9000!'

In this case or is used. If the first expression is Truthy, then the result returned is the result of the first expression. Otherwise, both expressions are evaluated and the result returned is the result of the second expression.

foo performs a filtration on the list to retain all numbers over 9000. If there exist any such numbers, the result of the list comprehension is a non-empty list which is Truthy, so it is returned (short circuiting in action here).

If there exist no such numbers, then the result of the list comp is [] which is Falsey. So the second expression is now evaluated (a non-empty string) and is returned.

And the alternative for this function would be:

def foo(*args):
    r = [x for x in args if x > 9000]
    if not r:
        return 'No number over 9000!' 

    return r
  • 25
    It is not "pythonic" to sacrifice all clarity for brevity, which I think is the case here. It's not a straightforward construct. – DBedrenko Oct 30 '17 at 6:53
  • 8
    I think one should note that Python conditional expressions have made this syntax less common. I certainly prefer max(args) - min(args) if len(args) else 0 to the original. – richardb Oct 30 '17 at 8:07
  • 3
    Another common one that is confusing at first, is assigning a value if none exists: "some_var = arg or 3" – Erik Oct 30 '17 at 8:09
  • 7
    @Baldrickk before people start bashing this syntax in favour of ternary operators, keep in mind that when it comes to n-ary condition expressions, ternary operators can get out of hand quickly. For example, if ... else (if ... else (if ... else (if ... else ...))) can just as well be rewritten as ... and ... and ... and ... and ... and at that point it really becomes hard to argue readability for either case. – coldspeed Oct 30 '17 at 10:15
  • 3
    It's not pythonic to sacrifice clarity for brevity, but this doesn't do so. It's a well known idiom. It's an idiom you have to learn, like any other idiom, but it's hardly 'sacrificing clarity'. – Miles Rout Oct 30 '17 at 21:31

Quoting from Python Docs

Note that neither and nor or restrict the value and type they return to False and True, but rather return the last evaluated argument. This is sometimes useful, e.g., if s is a string that should be replaced by a default value if it is empty, the expression s or 'foo' yields the desired value.

So, this is how Python was designed to evaluate the boolean expressions and the above documentation gives us an insight of why they did it so.

To get a boolean value just typecast it.

return bool(len(args) and max(args)-min(args))

Why?

Short-circuiting.

For example:

2 and 3 # Returns 3 because 2 is Truthy so it has to check 3 too
0 and 3 # Returns 0 because 0 is Falsey and there's no need to check 3 at all

The same goes for or too, that is, it will return the expression which is Truthy as soon as it finds it, cause evaluating the rest of the expression is redundant.

Instead of returning hardcore True or False, Python returns Truthy or Falsey, which are anyway going to evaluate to True or False. You could use the expression as is, and it will still work.


To know what's Truthy and Falsey, check Patrick Haugh's answer

and and or perform boolean logic, but they return one of the actual values when they are comparing. When using and, values are evaluated in a boolean context from left to right. 0, '', [], (), {}, and None are false in a boolean context; everything else is true.

If all values are true in a boolean context, and returns the last value.

>>> 2 and 5
5
>>> 2 and 5 and 10
10

If any value is false in a boolean context and returns the first false value.

>>> '' and 5
''
>>> 2 and 0 and 5
0

So the code

return len(args) and max(args)-min(args)

returns the value of max(args)-min(args) when there is args else it returns len(args) which is 0.

Is this legit/reliable style, or are there any gotchas on this?

This is legit, it is a short circuit evaluation where the last value is returned.

You provide a good example. The function will return 0 if no arguments are passed, and the code doesn't have to check for a special case of no arguments passed.

Another way to use this, is to default None arguments to a mutable primitive, like an empty list:

def fn(alist=None):
    alist = alist or []
    ....

If some non-truthy value is passed to alist it defaults to an empty list, handy way to avoid an if statement and the mutable default argument pitfall

Gotchas

Yes, there are a few gotchas.

fn() == fn(3) == fn(4, 4)

First, if fn returns 0, you cannot know if it was called without any parameter, with one parameter or with multiple, equal parameters :

>>> fn()
0
>>> fn(3)
0
>>> fn(3, 3, 3)
0

What does fn mean?

Then, Python is a dynamic language. It's not specified anywhere what fn does, what its input should be and what its output should look like. Therefore, it's really important to name the function correctly. Similarly, arguments don't have to be called args. delta(*numbers) or calculate_range(*numbers) might describe better what the function is supposed to do.

Argument errors

Finally, the logical and operator is supposed to prevent the function to fail if called without any argument. It still fails if some argument isn't a number, though:

>>> fn('1')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in fn
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'str' and 'str'
>>> fn(1, '2')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in fn
TypeError: '>' not supported between instances of 'str' and 'int'
>>> fn('a', 'b')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in fn
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'str' and 'str'

Possible alternative

Here's a way to write the function according to the "Easier to ask for forgiveness than permission." principle:

def delta(*numbers):
    try:
        return max(numbers) - min(numbers)
    except TypeError:
        raise ValueError("delta should only be called with numerical arguments") from None
    except ValueError:
        raise ValueError("delta should be called with at least one numerical argument") from None

As an example:

>>> delta()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 7, in delta
ValueError: delta should be called with at least one numerical argument
>>> delta(3)
0
>>> delta('a')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in delta
ValueError: delta should only be called with numerical arguments
>>> delta('a', 'b')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in delta
ValueError: delta should only be called with numerical arguments
>>> delta('a', 3)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in delta
ValueError: delta should only be called with numerical arguments
>>> delta(3, 4.5)
1.5
>>> delta(3, 5, 7, 2)
5

If you really don't want to raise an exception when delta is called without any argument, you could return some value which cannot be possible otherwise (e.g. -1 or None):

>>> def delta(*numbers):
...     try:
...         return max(numbers) - min(numbers)
...     except TypeError:
...         raise ValueError("delta should only be called with numerical arguments") from None
...     except ValueError:
...         return -1 # or None
... 
>>> 
>>> delta()
-1

Is this legit/reliable style, or are there any gotchas on this?

I would like to add to this question that it not only legit and reliable but it also ultra practical. Here is a simple example:

>>>example_list = []
>>>print example_list or 'empty list'
empty list

Therefore you can really use it at your advantage. In order to be conscise this is how I see it:

Or operator

Python's or operator returns the first Truth-y value, or the last value, and stops

And operator

Python's and operator returns the first False-y value, or the last value, and stops

Behind the scenes

In python, all numbers are interpreted as True except for 0. Therefore, saying:

0 and 10 

is the same as:

False and True

Which is clearly False. It is therefore logical that it returns 0

Yes. This is the correct behaviour of and comparison.

At least in Python, A and B returns B if A is essentially True including if A is NOT Null, NOT None NOT an Empty container (such as an empty list, dict, etc). A is returned IFF A is essentially False or None or Empty or Null.

On the other hand, A or B returns A if A is essentially True including if A is NOT Null, NOT None NOT an Empty container (such as an empty list, dict, etc), otherwise it returns B.

It is easy to not notice (or to overlook) this behaviour because, in Python, any non-null non-empty object evaluates to True is treated like a boolean.

For example, all the following will print "True"

if [102]: 
    print "True"
else: 
    print "False"

if "anything that is not empty or None": 
    print "True"
else: 
    print "False"

if {1, 2, 3}: 
    print "True"
else: 
    print "False"

On the other hand, all the following will print "False"

if []: 
    print "True"
else: 
    print "False"

if "": 
    print "True"
else: 
    print "False"

if set ([]): 
    print "True"
else: 
    print "False"
  • Thank you. I wanted to write A is essentially True. Corrected. – emmanuelsa Oct 31 '17 at 5:47

protected by coldspeed Nov 7 '17 at 3:27

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