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I've been reading about microservices and event sourcing and how it decouples services from one another. There are 2 concepts I am not clear on. First, if in a microservices architecture, each service can be developed independently how do we account for inter-service communication dependencies ?

For example, if Service A and Service B need to communicate, A needs to send an event to a central bus which B needs to listen for and act upon, but this seems to create a lot of dependencies. Now, if I am developing Service B, i need to know all of the events that Service A can generate. Also, if service A adds any new event, Service B also needs to change in order to handle that new event. All of this seems to create a dependency nightmare, and seems like you cannot truly develop each service 'independently'.

Secondly, how is a request/response type scenario handled at the API gateway or process manager level ? If the top level request fires off a bunch of cascading or interdependent events which need to be handled before returning a response to the caller, is this a scenario suited well for microservices ?

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Event sourcing is not event-driven architecture. Theoretically, you can have an internally event sourced Bounded Context/microservice in an ecosystem that doesn't use events for integration. You can also have non-event sourced BC's integrating via events.

Event-driven is one kind of asynchronous microservice integration. Synchronous integration is also possible. I don't know if that's what you implicitly contrast event-based integration with in your question, but the kind of dependency you have to manage is very similar in both cases.

So, no dependency nightmare that I can think of, at least no more than what you typically have when a subsystem A depends on a subsystem B.

Now, if I am developing Service B, i need to know all of the events that Service A can generate

No, you only subscribe to the ones you're interested in.

Also, if service A adds any new event, Service B also needs to change in order to handle that new event.

Again, not if you're not interested in it.

All of this seems to create a dependency nightmare, and seems like you cannot truly develop each service 'independently'.

As soon as one service depends on another, you obviously can't develop each service independently. You might have overinterpreted the kind of "independence" that loose coupling via events allows.

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  • That makes sense. I was thinking more of the development workflow. So now, there is still the dependency between the 2 different services/projects, except they are living in 2 separate code bases and any changes, if interdependent, need to be kept in sync and potentially rolled out together. It seems this would be much more difficult to manage then having them together. – John M. Oct 31 '17 at 16:18
  • About model design, there are many options. You might want to have a look at DDD's context mapping patterns: Shared Kernel, Customer/Supplier, Separate Ways, etc. Gregor Hohpe's Enterprise Integration Patterns also has a number of interesting strategies for model integration. – guillaume31 Oct 31 '17 at 16:37
  • Model design, integration style (async vs sync) and technical protocols are different but overlapping concerns about integrating services together. It's not always easy to not conflate them, but I think that's something you should have in mind when architecting a solution. – guillaume31 Oct 31 '17 at 16:48
  • Thanks I will look at those. One other thing, how is the request/response handled in that, a request comes in to the API Gateway, which then sends it off for processing asynchronously. Now, since there can be many services which asynchronously interact, how is the final response handed back to the original request which is still blocking and waiting at the API Gateway ? – John M. Oct 31 '17 at 16:49
  • I don't use the API Gateway pattern, so no idea. If what you have behind your gateway operation is a funnel-shaped group of calls, I guess waiting for all microservice calls to complete is the only solution. You might want to ask that in a separate question as it has little to do with event-driven though. – guillaume31 Oct 31 '17 at 16:59
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First, if in a microservices architecture, each service can be developed independently how do we account for inter-service communication dependencies ?

Messages - you break direct coupling between the services by concentrating on the messages that they exchange, and concentrate on a change strategy for your schema that is forwards and backwards compatible (so that old services can read messages from new ones).

Greg Young writes about these ideas in his book of event versioning.

If the top level request fires off a bunch of cascading or interdependent events which need to be handled before returning a response to the caller, is this a scenario suited well for microservices ?

It's fine, actually, so long as you incorporate stale data into your design.

Fundamentally, the response to the query takes time to travel to the client; unless you are locking out all writers while the data is in transit, there is every possibility the "truth" of the system will have changed while the packets were in flight.

So you don't specify that queries describe the state "now", but rather that queries describe the state as of some time in the past. So if you send a query request to service A, and the result includes data from service B, then the query result is going to include A's cached copy of B's data as of some particular time.

So A's query of B to get the data is asynchronous with regards to the request sent to A. If refreshed data arrives from B in time to answer the query, great -- you answer with somewhat fresher stale data.

And yes, it can happen that C writes a change to B, gets an acknowledgement, then queries A... and gets back a response that does not include the changes that were already written and acknowledged.

So you build into the solution that there is no universal clock.

On the first question though, it seems as a developer of Service B, i would need to know all of the events that can be fired from Service A, and I would have a continual dependency if there are new events added.

Not all events. You need a common format (like avro, or json, or protocol buffers) so that the event representation can be deserialized, and you need the consumer to be able to recognize the events that it does care about, but events that the consumer doesn't recognize can fall through to a single default handler.

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  • Thanks for the clarification on the second question I get that. On the first question though, it seems as a developer of Service B, i would need to know all of the events that can be fired from Service A, and I would have a continual dependency if there are new events added. So if A adds a new event B will have to change as well. This is the dependency I am talking about which seems like it would create a lot of problems, and I'm not sure how its handled. – John M. Oct 30 '17 at 19:00

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