I want to wait for a process to finish, but process.WaitForExit() hangs my GUI. Is there an event-based way, or do I need to spawn a thread to block until exit, then delegate the event myself?

up vote 25 down vote accepted

process.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
process.Exited += [EventHandler]

As of .NET 4.0/C# 5, it's nicer to represent this using the async pattern.

/// <summary>
/// Waits asynchronously for the process to exit.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="process">The process to wait for cancellation.</param>
/// <param name="cancellationToken">A cancellation token. If invoked, the task will return 
/// immediately as canceled.</param>
/// <returns>A Task representing waiting for the process to end.</returns>
public static Task WaitForExitAsync(this Process process, 
    CancellationToken cancellationToken = default(CancellationToken))
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
    process.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
    process.Exited += (sender, args) => tcs.TrySetResult(null);
    if(cancellationToken != default(CancellationToken))
        cancellationToken.Register(tcs.SetCanceled);

    return tcs.Task;
}

Usage:

public async void Test() 
{
   var process = new Process("processName");
   process.Start();
   await process.WaitForExitAsync();

   //Do some fun stuff here...
}
  • 1
    Thanks, this was helpful. One thing I had promblems with, though, is that tcs.SetResult(null) throws an InvalidOperationException if the task was already cancelled, which can happen if the process exits after the task was cancelled. To fix this, I replaced tcs.SetResult with tcs.TrySetResult. – AJ Richardson Oct 13 '14 at 15:22
  • 4
    If process stop before we register our Exited handler, we are waiting forever. Registration must be done before Start so it's much more easy to write a StartAsync method. Mostly same code but named StartAsync with a process.Start() juste before return line. – MuiBienCarlota Nov 28 '14 at 14:19
  • 4
    Note that the cancelling code here is not killing the process, so if the process if hanging it will be left running. If you want to stop the process when cancelling, change to following: cancellationToken.Register( () => { process.Kill(); tcs.SetCanceled(); }); – wangzq Jan 2 '16 at 3:09
  • 1
    @LonelyPixel Because it will block the thread during all time the process is running? – TN. Mar 10 '16 at 16:17
  • 2
    @LonelyPixel IMO, WaitForExit() will block a thread during the time the process is running. Depending on TaskScheduler, usually not the calling one, but one thread from ThreadPool. The solution from the answer may not block a ThreadPool thread. (It may not be a problem for you.) – TN. Mar 11 '16 at 11:19

If you choose @MgSam answer, be aware, if you pass through WaitForExitAsync some CancellationToken, that will be automatically canceled after the specified delay, you can get an InvalidOperationException. To fix that, you need to change

cancellationToken.Register(tcs.SetCanceled);

to

cancellationToken.Register( () => { tcs.TrySetCanceled(); } );

P.S.: don't forget to dispose your CancellationTokenSource in time.

  • That P.S. saved my life.... – Fazi Aug 23 '16 at 12:36

According to this link the WaitForExit() method is used to make the current thread wait until the associated process terminates. However, the Process does have an Exited event that you can hook into.

  • 3
    What's this then? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Ivan Danilov Jun 19 '11 at 21:35
  • Not true, the answer should be deleted not to collent downvotes I guess. – Andrey Moiseev Aug 3 '17 at 15:36
  • I’m guessing the prior commenters have imagined the word “not” in this answer? There isn’t one. – bacar Jun 20 at 22:30

Here's an extension method that's slightly cleaner, because it cleans up the cancellation token registration and Exited event. It also handles the race condition edge case, where the process could end after it started, but before the Exited event was attached. It uses the new local functions syntax in C# 7.

public static class ProcessExtensions
{
    public static async Task WaitForExitAsync(this Process process, CancellationToken cancellationToken = default)
    {
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

        void Process_Exited(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
             tcs.TrySetResult(true);
        }

        process.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
        process.Exited += Process_Exited;

        try
        {
            if (process.HasExited)
            {
                return;
            }

            using (cancellationToken.Register(() => tcs.TrySetCanceled()))
            {
                await tcs.Task;
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            process.Exited -= Process_Exited;
        }
    }
}

Use System.Diagnostics.Process.Exited

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