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Possible Duplicates:
How do you set, clear and toggle a single bit in C?
Removing lowest order bit

n is a positive integer. How can its rightmost set bit be unset?

Say n= 7 => n = 0111. I want 0110 as the output. Is there any simple bitwise hack to achieve the goal?

marked as duplicate by Martin York, mtrw, Cody Gray, Matthieu M., Prasoon Saurav Jan 16 '11 at 13:15

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Try n & (n-1) where & is bitwise AND

n = 7
n - 1 =6

n & (n-1)=> 0 1 1 1   (7)
          & 0 1 1 0   (6)
           --------- 
            0 1 1 0  (done!)

EDIT (in response to the comment given by Forest)

n = 6 
n - 1 = 5

n & (n-1)=> 0 1 1 0   (6)
          & 0 1 0 1   (5)
           --------- 
            0 1 0 0  (done!)
  • 1
    @taspeotis : Check out the question again " How can its rightmost set bit be unset?" – Prasoon Saurav Jan 16 '11 at 5:38
  • Ah, yes. I overlooked the word "set". – ʇsәɹoɈ Jan 16 '11 at 5:41
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    +1 Nice! I still don't understand how people see solutions like that so quickly. – Dawson Jan 16 '11 at 5:45
  • 4
    @Toolbox: Either we've seen them before or we spent our childhood inventing them. For me it's a bit of both. – Artelius Jan 16 '11 at 5:51
  • 1
    @Toolbox see Hacker's Delight (the book) – ergosys Jan 16 '11 at 5:54
4

Your question is unclear.

If you just want to unset bit 0, here are some methods (with slight variations in behavior depending on your types involved):

x &= -2;
x &= ~1;
x -= (x&1);

If you want to unset the lowest bit among the bits that are set, here are some ways:

x &= x-1;
x -= (x&-x);

Note that x&-x is equal to the lowest bit of x, at least when x is unsigned or twos complement. If you want to do any bit arithmetic like this, you should use only unsigned types, since signed types have implementation-defined behavior under bitwise operations.

  • 5
    "rightmost set bit" seems perfectly clear. It was just a poorly chosen example. – Matthew Flaschen Jan 16 '11 at 5:48
0
unsigned int clr_rm_set_bit(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int mask = 1;
    while(n & mask) {
        mask <<= 1;
    }
    return n & ~mask;
}
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    This is O(N) while Prasoon's is O(1). Also, you want something more like while(!(n & mask)), but even that doesn't work for n = 0. – Mike DeSimone Jan 16 '11 at 5:47
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    Actually this method (when correctly implemented) isn't O(n). It's O(log(n)). And since n is bounded by the size of an unsigned int, you could also call it O(1). – Artelius Jan 16 '11 at 5:56
  • Right, should have bounds checked for n==0 and n < MAXINT (or whatever the correct constant is for that) At least I interpreted the question correctly – Joe W Jan 16 '11 at 5:56

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