1

While trying to define an infinite loop that reads from a connection channel using Haskell, I came across the idea of folding over an infinite list of partially applied function using the Kleisli composition of monads. The idea seemed plausible and simple enough, but I came across a weird scenario where apparently the infinite list is being evaluated, instead of waiting for input.

I created the following example that illustrates my problem:

loop :: Int -> IO Int
loop s = (foldr (<=<) return (repeat process)) s

process :: Int -> IO Int
process i = do
    putStrLn $ show i
    x <- getLine
    return $ i + 1

main = loop 0

When I run the code above, GHCi stops after overflowing the stack. It doesn't wait for the "getLine". When I replace the <=< with >=>, it works as expected: the list will only get evaluated elements by element, after each "getLine".

Why does that happen? My foldr initial value is return, it shouldn't add any side effect to it and according to monad laws, the left and right identity with should guarantee equal behavior using both <=< and >=>.

3

You can't start visiting an infinite list from its end -- there is no end.

You code builds

action0 <=< (action1 <=< (action2 ....))

which has the right associativity, but x <=< y (roughly speaking) runs y before x.

Using >=> makes the computation start with action0 as intended.

Compare with this:

cons x xs = x : xs
snoc x xs = xs ++ [x]

foldr cons [] [1..] = [1..]
foldr snoc [] [1..] = _|_

This is no surprise, since foldr snoc [] = reverse, and we can't reverse an infinite list.

The issue here is that snoc evaluates the tail xs before x, so foldr evaluates the "recursive call" to the tail list before considering the element at hand.

In the monadic case things are more complex, but the general principle is similar in its spirit. Using foldr (<=<) return (repeat action) is similar to

loop x = do
   x' <- loop x
   action x'

Instead, foldr (>=>) return (repeat action) is similar to

loop x = do
   x' <- action x
   loop x'
  • I forgot that inverting the order of evaluation of the >=> would have that impact. Your answer was short and clear. Thank you very much! – Matheus Andrade Oct 31 '17 at 18:55
1

foldr works like this:

xs =
  a : (b : (c : ... (d : nil)...))
foldr kons knil xs =
  a `kons` (b `kons` (c `kons` ... (d `kons` knil)...))

So, in your case:

repeat process =
  process : (process : (process : ...))
foldr (<=<) return (repeat process) =
  process <=< (process <=< (process <=< ...))

Now, when you do an application (f <=< g) x, you have to apply g x first. In your case, to apply (process <=< (process <=< (process <=< ...))) x, you must first apply (process <=< (process <=< (process <=< ...))) x, so you must first apply (process <=< (process <=< (process <=< ...))) x, ... .

The solution (as you know) is to flip (<=<) to (>=>)

foldr (>=>) return (repeat process) =
  process >=> (process >=> (process >=> ...))

To apply (f >=> g) x, you have to apply f x first. In your case, to apply (process >=> (process >=> (process >=> ...))) x, you must first apply process x, which does work, and then you need to apply (process >=> (process >=> (process >=> ...))) x', so you apply process x', which does work, and then you need to apply (process >=> (process >=> (process >=> ...))) x'', so you need to apply process x'', ... .

The runtime doesn't care that the result should be the same either way. Checking that property means solving the halting problem, which is impossible to solve for every possible case. It's better that Haskell will predictably fail than to try to do the impossible and become a thousand times more confusing.

  • You three submitted answers basically at the same time, so I marked the first one as the official answer. Although, all the answers were extremely helpful and did answer my question. Thank you very much. – Matheus Andrade Oct 31 '17 at 18:54
1

Try to expand the foldr:

foldr (<=<) return (repeat process) s
-- becomes
(process <=< (process <=< (process … <=< return))) s

which has to evaluate the innermost function to apply s - failing of course. In contrast,

foldr (>=>) return (repeat process) s
-- becomes
(process >=> (process >=> (process … >=> return))) s

which when applying s will pass it to the first function in the chain, and only when passing the result of that to the next function the rest of the chain will be evaluated - lazily.

I don't think there is a way to construct the sequence

(return >=> (process >=> (process >=> (process …)))) s

using a fold, but you can use the fixpoint combinator:

fix (process >=>) s -- `return >=>` is a pointless `id` in front
-- or
fix (<=< process) s

Notice that the very similar fix (>=> process) and fix (process <=<) would have the same infinite recursion problem, trying forever to find the first function to apply.

  • You three submitted answers basically at the same time, so I marked the first one as the official answer. Although, all the answers were extremely helpful and did answer my question. Thank you very much. – Matheus Andrade Oct 31 '17 at 18:54
  • I forgot to thank you for the fixpoint combinator tip, it was indeed a better solution than using foldr. – Matheus Andrade Nov 1 '17 at 8:07

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