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I was loading more than 40k vertices in a BufferGeometry.

It worked, but the geometry was not rendered entirely. After decomposing the geometry into separate chunks of 40k vertices, it worked. I was using version r86.

Is this something related to the hardware I am using or to three js?

Please find bellow an adaptation of the code I used to create the BufferGeometry (normalgeom is a Geometry passed as parameter)

var positions = new Float32Array(chunkLength * 3);
var indices = new Uint16Array(chunkLength);
var chunkLength = normalgeom.vertices.length;
for (var i = 0; i < chunkLength; i++)
{
    var posInNormalGeom = i;
    positions[i * 3] = normalgeom.vertices[posInNormalGeom].x;
    positions[i * 3 + 1] = normalgeom.vertices[posInNormalGeom].y;
    positions[i * 3 + 2] = normalgeom.vertices[posInNormalGeom].z;
    indices[i] = i;
}

var buffGeom = new THREE.BufferGeometry();
buffGeom.addAttribute('position', new THREE.BufferAttribute(positions, 3));
buffGeom.setIndex(new THREE.BufferAttribute(new Uint16Array(indices), 1));

Afterwards, I was creating LineSegments from the buffer

var lineSegs = new THREE.LineSegments(buffGeom, material);
scene.add(lineSegs);

Update: after comment from @TheJim01, the code for splitting the geometry is the following

function makebuffered(normalgeom)
{
    var retArrays = new Array();

    var chunkLength = normalgeom.vertices.length;
    console.log("nr vertices:" + chunkLength);
    var remainingVertices = chunkLength;
    var processedVertices = 0;
    if(chunkLength > 40000)
    {
        chunkLength = 40000;
    }

    while(remainingVertices > 0)
    {
        if(remainingVertices <= chunkLength)
        {
            chunkLength = remainingVertices;
        }

        var positions = new Float32Array(chunkLength * 3);
        var indices = new Uint32Array(chunkLength);
        for (var i = 0; i < chunkLength; i++)
        {
            var posInNormalGeom = processedVertices + i;
            positions[i * 3] = normalgeom.vertices[posInNormalGeom].x;
            positions[i * 3 + 1] = normalgeom.vertices[posInNormalGeom].y;
            positions[i * 3 + 2] = normalgeom.vertices[posInNormalGeom].z;
            indices[i] = i;
        }

        var buffGeom = new THREE.BufferGeometry();
        buffGeom.addAttribute('position', new THREE.BufferAttribute(positions, 3));
        buffGeom.setIndex(new THREE.BufferAttribute(new Uint32Array(indices), 1));

        retArrays.push(buffGeom);

        remainingVertices -= chunkLength;
        processedVertices += chunkLength;
    }

    return retArrays;
}
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  • 1
    Can you explain how you imported the data? Maybe add a code-example? Nov 1, 2017 at 16:35
  • I updated the question with code example. Nov 1, 2017 at 17:17
  • Try using a Uint32Array for your indices. You may be going beyond the maximum value for Uint16Array, which would result in missing faces.
    – TheJim01
    Nov 1, 2017 at 19:57
  • @TheJim01: Now that you mention it, it makes sense. Thank you. I have not noticed that I am using 16bit indices. Nov 1, 2017 at 20:16
  • 1
    @sandualuclopotaru Why are you breaking your geometry into chunks? Why are you setting indices if you are not sharing vertices? Nov 2, 2017 at 18:52

1 Answer 1

2

You have 847666 vertices, which leads to 847666 indices, which is well beyond the bounds of a Uint16Array (max = 65535).

To alleviate this, use Uint32Array instead. All modern browsers (of any consequence) support 32-bit arrays for WebGL buffers.

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