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If Numba does not support try catch statements,

What is the workaround?

Suppose I am decoding a sequence of json objects,

for json_str in stream:
    obj = json.loads(json_str)

Which may sometimes be incorrect.

In standard python, I write:

for json_str in stream:
    try:
        obj = json.loads(json_str)
        ...
        sys.stdout.write(...)
    except:
        sys.stderr.write(...)

But, in my numba code, I cannot use the try...except construct. Is there a way to get around this?

Such as some kind of 'manual' catch of the error message?

  • 1
    Numba accelerates it > 10x (I am able to test using non-failing json). I am including the minimal example that produces the bug. – bordeo Nov 1 '17 at 22:14
  • It might be able to accelerate the ..., but it can't accelerate the JSON loading. – user2357112 Nov 1 '17 at 22:37
  • @user2357112 however, if I take the outer loop and json loading outside of the Numba compiled function, i get a large decrease in acceleration. So, at some point, I need to implement my solution. – bordeo Nov 1 '17 at 22:38
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Everything not supported by Numba nopython-mode probably won't be (noticeably) faster than plain Python, sometimes it will even be slower (even rarer it will be much slower). From your description it seems like what you didn't show is something numba can actually optimize. So my suggestion would be to refactor the code hidden in your ... in a function that you decorate with jit:

import numba as nb
import json

def main_func(stream):
    for json_str in stream:
        try:
            obj = json.loads(json_str)
            inner_func(obj)
            sys.stdout.write(...)
        except:
            sys.stderr.write(...)

@nb.jit
def inner_func(obj):
    ...

So the part that is actually supported and optimized by numba is in a seperate function and all the other stuff is done in the outer function that isn't jitted by numba. If you're lucky (but since numba doesn't support nopython mode with dicts and strings that's unlikely) numba will compile the inner_func in nopython mode and give you even more speedups.

More generally: If your code does compile when you decorate it with @nb.njit it will be really fast. If it doesn't compile with @nb.njit but only with @nb.jit you cannot know if it's faster or slower because numba will use a mix of object mode and nopython mode, so some parts will be fast, others will be slow. The slow parts shouldn't be in the jitted function (because they could prevent further numba optimizations).

  • See, I found that I was noticeably slower when no refactored it in this manner, empirically. Further, the try catch nesting alone causes a slowdown from pure numba with non-failing json. Although it is still about 10x speedier (I’m not really doing enough in the ... to get much more speed up after jit). – bordeo Nov 2 '17 at 17:32
  • @bordeo No I don't see because you didn't include the relevant code and the relevant data, nor the performance "test" to evaluate the performance. – MSeifert Nov 2 '17 at 17:35
  • Well, a lot of people on here are working. I ain’t posting my code, and my answer is ideal. Thank you. – bordeo Nov 2 '17 at 17:36
  • @bordeo I don't believe that. Your answer is a prime example how one can slow down a numba function. It could be that you were measuring the compilation cost (the first time you call a jitted function it's slow, so you have to call it once to jit it and then measure the time for the later calls) if it were really slower. – MSeifert Nov 2 '17 at 17:44
  • I found it to work. I will test again both ways. – bordeo Nov 2 '17 at 19:55
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From my understanding this is impossible from within a numba-compiled function. You may look into decoupling the json reads from those, writing a new json parser or if possible sanitizing your input beforehand.

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