1

Question

In Python, if I have a function with local variables and nested functions, I can assign these variables in the nested functions with the help of nonlocal:

def f():
    x = 0
    def _g():
        nonlocal x
        x = 1
    def _h():
        x = 2
    _g()
    _h()
    print(x)
f() # 1

My issue with this solution is that if I have many local variables in f(), the use of nonlocal is verbose, and more disturbingly, it is very easy to forget nonlocal for a variable, and to create local variables in the nested functions without noticing it (what did I really mean in the h() function above, for instance?).

I have seen and used an alternative:

def f():
    class state:
        x = 0
    def _g():
        state.x = 1
    def _h():
        x = 2
    _g()
    _h()
    print(state.x)
f() # 1

If uses the fact that a class in Python is actually an object too. Using 'class' that way is actually the least verbose way of creating a mutable container for local values (I believe).

I think there are two questionable aspects in this pattern:

  • That particular use of the 'class'-keyword might be considered as a hack.
  • Since the container is somewhat artificial, it is sometimes difficult to find a good name for it (I went so far as testing the use of the name 'self' for it, but that seemed even more like a hack).

Is this a good pattern? What alternatives do you usually use?

If StackOverflow is not the right forum for this question, please advise on a different forum that you think is better suited (I did read the FAQs, but what the correct forum is for this question not obvious to me).

Thanks in advance.

P.S.

For the sake of completeness, there is at least one more alternative, which feels even more like a hack:

class f:
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = 0
        self._g()
        self._h()
        print(self.x)
    def _g(self):
        self.x = 1
    def _h(self):
        x = 2
f() # 1

This works because in Python, class instantiation has the same syntax as a function call.

Answer

See the accepted answer below. For a discussion about a solution when the function needs to return a value see there.

3

Your "last resort" alernative is of course cleaner - if you can do it in flattened methods that share an state, that is more readable code than nested functions to do the same job. "Flat is better than nested".

Other than that, you are creating a class to have a namespace. You could simply create an object to work as namespace, and it would work as a namespace - that is more usual. The only thing there is that if you simply create an instance of object itself, it can't work as namespace, because it have no __dict__, so you can't freely attribute objects for this.

That is why buried in the types module in the stdlib there is a class named SimpleNamespace exactly for this use case.

Just do:

from types import SimpleNamespace

def f():
    state = SimpleNamespace()
    state.x = 0
    ...

(but only if you don't change your mind and go for the class-based solution which is cleaner anyway).

  • So you you think that instantiating a class for the side effects of its __init__() method and throwing away the resulting object is a good pattern? Did I understand you correctly? – nilo Nov 1 '17 at 23:42
  • Obviously you did mean that. I just didn't expect such an answer, since some other experienced Stackoverflower had called it a hack in an earlier question. But why not? After all, this creates an object because it is necessary and throws it aways when it has done it's job. And since object creation has a function call syntax, we use the function casing. Great. I believe this pattern would work in C++ too. – nilo Nov 2 '17 at 5:40
  • Your info about SimpleNameSpace was interesting too. Thanks. – nilo Nov 2 '17 at 5:40
  • "Instantiating an object" is not an efficiency worry we should have while writing Python code. You see, even the "cool" pattern to swap two variables: a, b = b, a creates a tuple and destroys it back. The twists you'd come around in readability for using nested functions are not worth it by far. – jsbueno Nov 2 '17 at 13:56
  • It is just a "stdlib sugar" for class SimpleNamespace(object): pass anyway. – jsbueno Nov 2 '17 at 14:36
1

Why not just use a dict instead of the class. This removes some of the "hackyness" and is Python 2 compatible:

def f():
    state=dict(x=0)

    def _g():
        state["x"] = 1

    def _h():
        x = 2
    _g()
    _h()
    print(state["x"])
f() # 1
  • because verbosity. Typing 3 extra symbols, reading then back - dictionaries are not "clean". If you are on an internaitonal keyboard, usually ' maps to a dead letter, and have to be followed by pressing Space - that is full 6 keystrokes besides the namespace variable just to get to x. – jsbueno Nov 1 '17 at 23:08

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