I wrote the two methods below to automatically select N distinct colors. It works by defining a piecewise linear function on the RGB cube. The benefit of this is you can also get a progressive scale if that's what you want, but when N gets large the colors can start to look similar. I can also imagine evenly subdividing the RGB cube into a lattice and then drawing points. Does anyone know any other methods? I'm ruling out defining a list and then just cycling through it. I should also say I don't generally care if they clash or don't look nice, they just have to be visually distinct.

public static List<Color> pick(int num) {
    List<Color> colors = new ArrayList<Color>();
    if (num < 2)
        return colors;
    float dx = 1.0f / (float) (num - 1);
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        colors.add(get(i * dx));
    }
    return colors;
}

public static Color get(float x) {
    float r = 0.0f;
    float g = 0.0f;
    float b = 1.0f;
    if (x >= 0.0f && x < 0.2f) {
        x = x / 0.2f;
        r = 0.0f;
        g = x;
        b = 1.0f;
    } else if (x >= 0.2f && x < 0.4f) {
        x = (x - 0.2f) / 0.2f;
        r = 0.0f;
        g = 1.0f;
        b = 1.0f - x;
    } else if (x >= 0.4f && x < 0.6f) {
        x = (x - 0.4f) / 0.2f;
        r = x;
        g = 1.0f;
        b = 0.0f;
    } else if (x >= 0.6f && x < 0.8f) {
        x = (x - 0.6f) / 0.2f;
        r = 1.0f;
        g = 1.0f - x;
        b = 0.0f;
    } else if (x >= 0.8f && x <= 1.0f) {
        x = (x - 0.8f) / 0.2f;
        r = 1.0f;
        g = 0.0f;
        b = x;
    }
    return new Color(r, g, b);
}

13 Answers 13

up vote 74 down vote accepted

You can use the HSL color model to create your colors.

If all you want is differing hues (likely), and slight variations on lightness or saturation, you can distribute the hues like so:

// assumes hue [0, 360), saturation [0, 100), lightness [0, 100)

for(i = 0; i < 360; i += 360 / num_colors) {
    HSLColor c;
    c.hue = i;
    c.saturation = 90 + randf() * 10;
    c.lightness = 50 + randf() * 10;

    addColor(c);
}
  • 2
    This technique is smart. I bet it'll get more aesthetic results than mine. – mquander Jan 22 '09 at 20:51
  • 37
    This assumes that equally-spaced hue values are equally perceptually different. Even discounting various forms of colorblindness, this is not true for most people: the difference between 120° (green) and 135° (very slightly mint green) is imperceptible, while the difference between 30° (orange) and 45° (peach) is quite obvious. You need a non-linear spacing along the hue for best results. – Phrogz Feb 21 '12 at 17:05
  • 16
    @mquander - It's not smart at all. There's nothing to prevent this algorithm from accidentally picking two almost identical colours. My answer is better, and ohadsc's answer is much better. – Rocketmagnet Jun 1 '12 at 17:51
  • 1
    This is wrong for the reasons already mentioned, but also because you are not picking uniformly. – sam hocevar Dec 30 '12 at 22:12
  • 1
    @strager what is the expected value of randf() – Killrawr Mar 29 '16 at 22:04

This questions appears in quite a few SO discussions:

Different solutions are proposed, but none are optimal. Luckily, science comes to the rescue

Arbitrary N

The last 2 will be free via most university libraries / proxies.

N is finite and relatively small

In this case, one could go for a list solution. A very interesting article in the subject is freely available:

There are several color lists to consider:

  • Boynton's list of 11 colors that are almost never confused (available in the first paper of the previous section)
  • Kelly's 22 colors of maximum contrast (available in the paper above)

I also ran into this Palette by an MIT student. Lastly, The following links may be useful in converting between different color systems / coordinates (some colors in the articles are not specified in RGB, for instance):

For Kelly's and Boynton's list, I've already made the conversion to RGB (with the exception of white and black, which should be obvious). Some C# code:

public static ReadOnlyCollection<Color> KellysMaxContrastSet
{
    get { return _kellysMaxContrastSet.AsReadOnly(); }
}

private static readonly List<Color> _kellysMaxContrastSet = new List<Color>
{
    UIntToColor(0xFFFFB300), //Vivid Yellow
    UIntToColor(0xFF803E75), //Strong Purple
    UIntToColor(0xFFFF6800), //Vivid Orange
    UIntToColor(0xFFA6BDD7), //Very Light Blue
    UIntToColor(0xFFC10020), //Vivid Red
    UIntToColor(0xFFCEA262), //Grayish Yellow
    UIntToColor(0xFF817066), //Medium Gray

    //The following will not be good for people with defective color vision
    UIntToColor(0xFF007D34), //Vivid Green
    UIntToColor(0xFFF6768E), //Strong Purplish Pink
    UIntToColor(0xFF00538A), //Strong Blue
    UIntToColor(0xFFFF7A5C), //Strong Yellowish Pink
    UIntToColor(0xFF53377A), //Strong Violet
    UIntToColor(0xFFFF8E00), //Vivid Orange Yellow
    UIntToColor(0xFFB32851), //Strong Purplish Red
    UIntToColor(0xFFF4C800), //Vivid Greenish Yellow
    UIntToColor(0xFF7F180D), //Strong Reddish Brown
    UIntToColor(0xFF93AA00), //Vivid Yellowish Green
    UIntToColor(0xFF593315), //Deep Yellowish Brown
    UIntToColor(0xFFF13A13), //Vivid Reddish Orange
    UIntToColor(0xFF232C16), //Dark Olive Green
};

public static ReadOnlyCollection<Color> BoyntonOptimized
{
    get { return _boyntonOptimized.AsReadOnly(); }
}

private static readonly List<Color> _boyntonOptimized = new List<Color>
{
    Color.FromArgb(0, 0, 255),      //Blue
    Color.FromArgb(255, 0, 0),      //Red
    Color.FromArgb(0, 255, 0),      //Green
    Color.FromArgb(255, 255, 0),    //Yellow
    Color.FromArgb(255, 0, 255),    //Magenta
    Color.FromArgb(255, 128, 128),  //Pink
    Color.FromArgb(128, 128, 128),  //Gray
    Color.FromArgb(128, 0, 0),      //Brown
    Color.FromArgb(255, 128, 0),    //Orange
};

static public Color UIntToColor(uint color)
{
    var a = (byte)(color >> 24);
    var r = (byte)(color >> 16);
    var g = (byte)(color >> 8);
    var b = (byte)(color >> 0);
    return Color.FromArgb(a, r, g, b);
}

And here are the RGB values in hex and 8-bit-per-channel representations:

kelly_colors_hex = [
    0xFFB300, # Vivid Yellow
    0x803E75, # Strong Purple
    0xFF6800, # Vivid Orange
    0xA6BDD7, # Very Light Blue
    0xC10020, # Vivid Red
    0xCEA262, # Grayish Yellow
    0x817066, # Medium Gray

    # The following don't work well for people with defective color vision
    0x007D34, # Vivid Green
    0xF6768E, # Strong Purplish Pink
    0x00538A, # Strong Blue
    0xFF7A5C, # Strong Yellowish Pink
    0x53377A, # Strong Violet
    0xFF8E00, # Vivid Orange Yellow
    0xB32851, # Strong Purplish Red
    0xF4C800, # Vivid Greenish Yellow
    0x7F180D, # Strong Reddish Brown
    0x93AA00, # Vivid Yellowish Green
    0x593315, # Deep Yellowish Brown
    0xF13A13, # Vivid Reddish Orange
    0x232C16, # Dark Olive Green
    ]

kelly_colors = dict(vivid_yellow=(255, 179, 0),
                    strong_purple=(128, 62, 117),
                    vivid_orange=(255, 104, 0),
                    very_light_blue=(166, 189, 215),
                    vivid_red=(193, 0, 32),
                    grayish_yellow=(206, 162, 98),
                    medium_gray=(129, 112, 102),

                    # these aren't good for people with defective color vision:
                    vivid_green=(0, 125, 52),
                    strong_purplish_pink=(246, 118, 142),
                    strong_blue=(0, 83, 138),
                    strong_yellowish_pink=(255, 122, 92),
                    strong_violet=(83, 55, 122),
                    vivid_orange_yellow=(255, 142, 0),
                    strong_purplish_red=(179, 40, 81),
                    vivid_greenish_yellow=(244, 200, 0),
                    strong_reddish_brown=(127, 24, 13),
                    vivid_yellowish_green=(147, 170, 0),
                    deep_yellowish_brown=(89, 51, 21),
                    vivid_reddish_orange=(241, 58, 19),
                    dark_olive_green=(35, 44, 22))

For all you Java developers, here are the JavaFX colors:

// Don't forget to import javafx.scene.paint.Color;

private static final Color[] KELLY_COLORS = {
    Color.web("0xFFB300"),    // Vivid Yellow
    Color.web("0x803E75"),    // Strong Purple
    Color.web("0xFF6800"),    // Vivid Orange
    Color.web("0xA6BDD7"),    // Very Light Blue
    Color.web("0xC10020"),    // Vivid Red
    Color.web("0xCEA262"),    // Grayish Yellow
    Color.web("0x817066"),    // Medium Gray

    Color.web("0x007D34"),    // Vivid Green
    Color.web("0xF6768E"),    // Strong Purplish Pink
    Color.web("0x00538A"),    // Strong Blue
    Color.web("0xFF7A5C"),    // Strong Yellowish Pink
    Color.web("0x53377A"),    // Strong Violet
    Color.web("0xFF8E00"),    // Vivid Orange Yellow
    Color.web("0xB32851"),    // Strong Purplish Red
    Color.web("0xF4C800"),    // Vivid Greenish Yellow
    Color.web("0x7F180D"),    // Strong Reddish Brown
    Color.web("0x93AA00"),    // Vivid Yellowish Green
    Color.web("0x593315"),    // Deep Yellowish Brown
    Color.web("0xF13A13"),    // Vivid Reddish Orange
    Color.web("0x232C16"),    // Dark Olive Green
};

the following is the unsorted kelly colors according to the order above.

unsorted kelly colors

the following is the sorted kelly colors according to hues (note that some yellows are not very contrasting)

 sorted kelly colors

Here's an idea. Imagine an HSV cylinder

Define the upper and lower limits you want for the Brightness and Saturation. This defines a square cross section ring within the space.

Now, scatter N points randomly within this space.

Then apply an iterative repulsion algorithm on them, either for a fixed number of iterations, or until the points stabilise.

Now you should have N points representing N colours that are about as different as possible within the colour space you're interested in.

Hugo

Like Uri Cohen's answer, but is a generator instead. Will start by using colors far apart. Deterministic.

Sample, left colors first: sample

#!/usr/bin/env python3.3
import colorsys
import itertools
from fractions import Fraction

def zenos_dichotomy():
    """
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1/2_%2B_1/4_%2B_1/8_%2B_1/16_%2B_%C2%B7_%C2%B7_%C2%B7
    """
    for k in itertools.count():
        yield Fraction(1,2**k)

def getfracs():
    """
    [Fraction(0, 1), Fraction(1, 2), Fraction(1, 4), Fraction(3, 4), Fraction(1, 8), Fraction(3, 8), Fraction(5, 8), Fraction(7, 8), Fraction(1, 16), Fraction(3, 16), ...]
    [0.0, 0.5, 0.25, 0.75, 0.125, 0.375, 0.625, 0.875, 0.0625, 0.1875, ...]
    """
    yield 0
    for k in zenos_dichotomy():
        i = k.denominator # [1,2,4,8,16,...]
        for j in range(1,i,2):
            yield Fraction(j,i)

bias = lambda x: (math.sqrt(x/3)/Fraction(2,3)+Fraction(1,3))/Fraction(6,5) # can be used for the v in hsv to map linear values 0..1 to something that looks equidistant

def genhsv(h):
    for s in [Fraction(6,10)]: # optionally use range
        for v in [Fraction(8,10),Fraction(5,10)]: # could use range too
            yield (h, s, v) # use bias for v here if you use range

genrgb = lambda x: colorsys.hsv_to_rgb(*x)

flatten = itertools.chain.from_iterable

gethsvs = lambda: flatten(map(genhsv,getfracs()))

getrgbs = lambda: map(genrgb, gethsvs())

def genhtml(x):
    uint8tuple = map(lambda y: int(y*255), x)
    return "rgb({},{},{})".format(*uint8tuple)

gethtmlcolors = lambda: map(genhtml, getrgbs())

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print(list(itertools.islice(gethtmlcolors(), 100)))
  • +1 for the sample, very nice, and shows the scheme is attractive too. The other answers here would be improved by doing the same and then could be readily compared. – Don Hatch Apr 20 '16 at 9:01
  • 1
    The amount of lambdas is too damn high. The lambda is strong with this one. – Gyfis Oct 1 '16 at 19:49
  • Looks great, but gets stuck when I try to run it on 2.7 – Elad Weiss Mar 5 at 10:25

For the sake of generations to come I add here the accepted answer in Python.

import numpy as np
import colorsys

def _get_colors(num_colors):
    colors=[]
    for i in np.arange(0., 360., 360. / num_colors):
        hue = i/360.
        lightness = (50 + np.random.rand() * 10)/100.
        saturation = (90 + np.random.rand() * 10)/100.
        colors.append(colorsys.hls_to_rgb(hue, lightness, saturation))
    return colors

Everyone seems to have missed the existence of the very useful YUV color space which was designed to represent perceived color differences in the human visual system. Distances in YUV represent differences in human perception. I needed this functionality for MagicCube4D which implements 4-dimensional Rubik's cubes and an unlimited numbers of other 4D twisty puzzles having arbitrary numbers of faces.

My solution starts by selecting random points in YUV and then iteratively breaking up the closest two points, and only converting to RGB when returning the result. The method is O(n^3) but that doesn't matter for small numbers or ones that can be cached. It can certainly be made more efficient but the results appear to be excellent.

The function allows for optional specification of brightness thresholds so as not to produce colors in which no component is brighter or darker than given amounts. IE you may not want values close to black or white. This is useful when the resulting colors will be used as base colors that are later shaded via lighting, layering, transparency, etc. and must still appear different from their base colors.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.util.Random;

/**
 * Contains a method to generate N visually distinct colors and helper methods.
 * 
 * @author Melinda Green
 */
public class ColorUtils {
    private ColorUtils() {} // To disallow instantiation.
    private final static float
        U_OFF = .436f,
        V_OFF = .615f;
    private static final long RAND_SEED = 0;
    private static Random rand = new Random(RAND_SEED);    

    /*
     * Returns an array of ncolors RGB triplets such that each is as unique from the rest as possible
     * and each color has at least one component greater than minComponent and one less than maxComponent.
     * Use min == 1 and max == 0 to include the full RGB color range.
     * 
     * Warning: O N^2 algorithm blows up fast for more than 100 colors.
     */
    public static Color[] generateVisuallyDistinctColors(int ncolors, float minComponent, float maxComponent) {
        rand.setSeed(RAND_SEED); // So that we get consistent results for each combination of inputs

        float[][] yuv = new float[ncolors][3];

        // initialize array with random colors
        for(int got = 0; got < ncolors;) {
            System.arraycopy(randYUVinRGBRange(minComponent, maxComponent), 0, yuv[got++], 0, 3);
        }
        // continually break up the worst-fit color pair until we get tired of searching
        for(int c = 0; c < ncolors * 1000; c++) {
            float worst = 8888;
            int worstID = 0;
            for(int i = 1; i < yuv.length; i++) {
                for(int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
                    float dist = sqrdist(yuv[i], yuv[j]);
                    if(dist < worst) {
                        worst = dist;
                        worstID = i;
                    }
                }
            }
            float[] best = randYUVBetterThan(worst, minComponent, maxComponent, yuv);
            if(best == null)
                break;
            else
                yuv[worstID] = best;
        }

        Color[] rgbs = new Color[yuv.length];
        for(int i = 0; i < yuv.length; i++) {
            float[] rgb = new float[3];
            yuv2rgb(yuv[i][0], yuv[i][1], yuv[i][2], rgb);
            rgbs[i] = new Color(rgb[0], rgb[1], rgb[2]);
            //System.out.println(rgb[i][0] + "\t" + rgb[i][1] + "\t" + rgb[i][2]);
        }

        return rgbs;
    }

    public static void hsv2rgb(float h, float s, float v, float[] rgb) {
        // H is given on [0->6] or -1. S and V are given on [0->1]. 
        // RGB are each returned on [0->1]. 
        float m, n, f;
        int i;

        float[] hsv = new float[3];

        hsv[0] = h;
        hsv[1] = s;
        hsv[2] = v;
        System.out.println("H: " + h + " S: " + s + " V:" + v);
        if(hsv[0] == -1) {
            rgb[0] = rgb[1] = rgb[2] = hsv[2];
            return;
        }
        i = (int) (Math.floor(hsv[0]));
        f = hsv[0] - i;
        if(i % 2 == 0)
            f = 1 - f; // if i is even 
        m = hsv[2] * (1 - hsv[1]);
        n = hsv[2] * (1 - hsv[1] * f);
        switch(i) {
            case 6:
            case 0:
                rgb[0] = hsv[2];
                rgb[1] = n;
                rgb[2] = m;
                break;
            case 1:
                rgb[0] = n;
                rgb[1] = hsv[2];
                rgb[2] = m;
                break;
            case 2:
                rgb[0] = m;
                rgb[1] = hsv[2];
                rgb[2] = n;
                break;
            case 3:
                rgb[0] = m;
                rgb[1] = n;
                rgb[2] = hsv[2];
                break;
            case 4:
                rgb[0] = n;
                rgb[1] = m;
                rgb[2] = hsv[2];
                break;
            case 5:
                rgb[0] = hsv[2];
                rgb[1] = m;
                rgb[2] = n;
                break;
        }
    }


    // From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YUV#Mathematical_derivations_and_formulas
    public static void yuv2rgb(float y, float u, float v, float[] rgb) {
        rgb[0] = 1 * y + 0 * u + 1.13983f * v;
        rgb[1] = 1 * y + -.39465f * u + -.58060f * v;
        rgb[2] = 1 * y + 2.03211f * u + 0 * v;
    }

    public static void rgb2yuv(float r, float g, float b, float[] yuv) {
        yuv[0] = .299f * r + .587f * g + .114f * b;
        yuv[1] = -.14713f * r + -.28886f * g + .436f * b;
        yuv[2] = .615f * r + -.51499f * g + -.10001f * b;
    }

    private static float[] randYUVinRGBRange(float minComponent, float maxComponent) {
        while(true) {
            float y = rand.nextFloat(); // * YFRAC + 1-YFRAC);
            float u = rand.nextFloat() * 2 * U_OFF - U_OFF;
            float v = rand.nextFloat() * 2 * V_OFF - V_OFF;
            float[] rgb = new float[3];
            yuv2rgb(y, u, v, rgb);
            float r = rgb[0], g = rgb[1], b = rgb[2];
            if(0 <= r && r <= 1 &&
                0 <= g && g <= 1 &&
                0 <= b && b <= 1 &&
                (r > minComponent || g > minComponent || b > minComponent) && // don't want all dark components
                (r < maxComponent || g < maxComponent || b < maxComponent)) // don't want all light components

                return new float[]{y, u, v};
        }
    }

    private static float sqrdist(float[] a, float[] b) {
        float sum = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
            float diff = a[i] - b[i];
            sum += diff * diff;
        }
        return sum;
    }

    private static double worstFit(Color[] colors) {
        float worst = 8888;
        float[] a = new float[3], b = new float[3];
        for(int i = 1; i < colors.length; i++) {
            colors[i].getColorComponents(a);
            for(int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
                colors[j].getColorComponents(b);
                float dist = sqrdist(a, b);
                if(dist < worst) {
                    worst = dist;
                }
            }
        }
        return Math.sqrt(worst);
    }

    private static float[] randYUVBetterThan(float bestDistSqrd, float minComponent, float maxComponent, float[][] in) {
        for(int attempt = 1; attempt < 100 * in.length; attempt++) {
            float[] candidate = randYUVinRGBRange(minComponent, maxComponent);
            boolean good = true;
            for(int i = 0; i < in.length; i++)
                if(sqrdist(candidate, in[i]) < bestDistSqrd)
                    good = false;
            if(good)
                return candidate;
        }
        return null; // after a bunch of passes, couldn't find a candidate that beat the best.
    }


    /**
     * Simple example program.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final int ncolors = 10;
        Color[] colors = generateVisuallyDistinctColors(ncolors, .8f, .3f);
        for(int i = 0; i < colors.length; i++) {
            System.out.println(colors[i].toString());
        }
        System.out.println("Worst fit color = " + worstFit(colors));
    }

}
  • Is there a C# version of this code anywhere? I tried converting it and running with the same arguments you passed to generateVisuallyDistinctColors() and it seems to run really slow. Is that expected? – Chris Smith Jun 28 '16 at 23:05
  • Do you get the same results? It's plenty fast for my needs but like I said, I've not attempted to optimize it, so if that's your only problem, you should probably pay attention to memory allocation/deallocation. I know nothing about C# memory management. At worst, you could reduce the 1,000 outer loop constant to something smaller and the quality difference may not even be noticeable. – Melinda Green Jun 29 '16 at 4:06
  • 1
    My palette must contain certain colors but I wanted to fill in the extras. I like your method b/c I can put my required colors first in your yuv array and then modified "j=0" to start optimizing after my required colors. I wish the breaking up of worst pairs was a little smarter but I can understand why that's hard. – Ryan Aug 2 '16 at 20:43
  • I think your yuv2rgb method is missing the clamp(0,255). – Ryan Aug 3 '16 at 18:25
  • yuv2rgb is all floats, not bytes Ryan. Please write to melinda@superliminal.com to discuss. – Melinda Green Aug 3 '16 at 22:22

Here's a solution to managed your "distinct" issue, which is entirely overblown:

Create a unit sphere and drop points on it with repelling charges. Run a particle system until they no longer move (or the delta is "small enough"). At this point, each of the points are as far away from each other as possible. Convert (x, y, z) to rgb.

I mention it because for certain classes of problems, this type of solution can work better than brute force.

I originally saw this approach here for tesselating a sphere.

Again, the most obvious solutions of traversing HSL space or RGB space will probably work just fine.

  • 1
    That's a good idea, but it probably makes sense to use a cube, rather than a sphere. – Rocketmagnet Jan 22 '09 at 23:21
  • 1
    That's what my YUV-based solution does but for a 3D box (not cube). – Melinda Green Sep 8 '16 at 1:09

I would try to fix saturation and lumination to maximum and focus on hue only. As I see it, H can go from 0 to 255 and then wraps around. Now if you wanted two contrasting colours you would take the opposite sides of this ring, i.e. 0 and 128. If you wanted 4 colours, you would take some separated by 1/4 of the 256 length of the circle, i.e. 0, 64,128,192. And of course, as others suggested when you need N colours, you could just separate them by 256/N.

What I would add to this idea is to use a reversed representation of a binary number to form this sequence. Look at this:

0 = 00000000  after reversal is 00000000 = 0
1 = 00000001  after reversal is 10000000 = 128
2 = 00000010  after reversal is 01000000 = 64
3 = 00000011  after reversal is 11000000 = 192

... this way if you need N different colours you could just take first N numbers, reverse them, and you get as much distant points as possible (for N being power of two) while at the same time preserving that each prefix of the sequence differs a lot.

This was an important goal in my use case, as I had a chart where colors were sorted by area covered by this colour. I wanted the largest areas of the chart to have large contrast, and I was ok with some small areas to have colours similar to those from top 10, as it was obvious for the reader which one is which one by just observing the area.

If N is big enough, you're going to get some similar-looking colors. There's only so many of them in the world.

Why not just evenly distribute them through the spectrum, like so:

IEnumerable<Color> CreateUniqueColors(int nColors)
{
    int subdivision = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Pow(nColors, 1/3d));
    for(int r = 0; r < 255; r += subdivision)
        for(int g = 0; g < 255; g += subdivision)
            for(int b = 0; b < 255; b += subdivision)
                yield return Color.FromArgb(r, g, b);
}

If you want to mix up the sequence so that similar colors aren't next to each other, you could maybe shuffle the resulting list.

Am I underthinking this?

  • -1. You are generating shades of gray. – Boris Yankov May 22 '13 at 0:20
  • 2
    Yes, you're under-thinking this. Human color perception is not linear, unfortunately. You may also need to account for Bezold–Brücke shift if you are using varying intensities. There is also good information here: vis4.net/blog/posts/avoid-equidistant-hsv-colors – spex Apr 14 '14 at 16:13

This is trivial in MATLAB (there is an hsv command):

cmap = hsv(number_of_colors)

I have written a package for R called qualpalr that is designed specifically for this purpose. I recommend you look at the vignette to find out how it works, but I will try to summarize the main points.

qualpalr takes a specification of colors in the HSL color space (which was described previously in this thread), projects it to the DIN99d color space (which is perceptually uniform) and find the n that maximize the minimum distance between any oif them.

# Create a palette of 4 colors of hues from 0 to 360, saturations between
# 0.1 and 0.5, and lightness from 0.6 to 0.85
pal <- qualpal(n = 4, list(h = c(0, 360), s = c(0.1, 0.5), l = c(0.6, 0.85)))

# Look at the colors in hex format
pal$hex
#> [1] "#6F75CE" "#CC6B76" "#CAC16A" "#76D0D0"

# Create a palette using one of the predefined color subspaces
pal2 <- qualpal(n = 4, colorspace = "pretty")

# Distance matrix of the DIN99d color differences
pal2$de_DIN99d
#>        #69A3CC #6ECC6E #CA6BC4
#> 6ECC6E      22                
#> CA6BC4      21      30        
#> CD976B      24      21      21

plot(pal2)

enter image description here

I think this simple recursive algorithm complementes the accepted answer, in order to generate distinct hue values. I made it for hsv, but can be used for other color spaces too.

It generates hues in cycles, as separate as possible to each other in each cycle.

/**
 * 1st cycle: 0, 120, 240
 * 2nd cycle (+60): 60, 180, 300
 * 3th cycle (+30): 30, 150, 270, 90, 210, 330
 * 4th cycle (+15): 15, 135, 255, 75, 195, 315, 45, 165, 285, 105, 225, 345
 */
public static float recursiveHue(int n) {
    // if 3: alternates red, green, blue variations
    float firstCycle = 3;

    // First cycle
    if (n < firstCycle) {
        return n * 360f / firstCycle;
    }
    // Each cycle has as much values as all previous cycles summed (powers of 2)
    else {
        // floor of log base 2
        int numCycles = (int)Math.floor(Math.log(n / firstCycle) / Math.log(2));
        // divDown stores the larger power of 2 that is still lower than n
        int divDown = (int)(firstCycle * Math.pow(2, numCycles));
        // same hues than previous cycle, but summing an offset (half than previous cycle)
        return recursiveHue(n % divDown) + 180f / divDown;
    }
}

I was unable to find this kind of algorithm here. I hope it helps, it's my first post here.

HSL color model may be well suited for "sorting" colors, but if you are looking for visually distinct colors you definitively need Lab color model instead.

CIELAB was designed to be perceptually uniform with respect to human color vision, meaning that the same amount of numerical change in these values corresponds to about the same amount of visually perceived change.

Once you know that, finding the optimal subset of N colors from a wide range of colors is still a (NP) hard problem, kind of similar to the Travelling salesman problem and all the solutions using k-mean algorithms or something won't really help.

That said, if N is not too big and if you start with a limited set of colors, you will easily find a very good subset of distincts colors according to a Lab distance with a simple random function.

I've coded such a tool for my own usage (you can find it here: https://mokole.com/palette.html), here is what I got for N=7: enter image description here

It's all javascript so feel free to take a look on the source of the page and adapt it for your own needs.

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