7

I tried to invoke std::thread perfect forwarding constructor (template< class Function, class... Args > explicit thread( Function&& f, Args&&... args );) with a pointer to function (NOT a pointer to member function), as shown in the following M(N)WE:

#include <thread>
#include <string>

static void foo(std::string query, int & x)
{
  while(true);
}

int main() {
 int i = 1;
 auto thd = std::thread(&foo, std::string("bar"), i);
 thd.join();
}

Live demo: https://godbolt.org/g/Cwi6wd

Why does the code not compile on GCC, Clang and MSVC, complaining about a missing overload of invoke (or similar names)? A function argument is a pointer to a function, so it should be a Callable, right?

Please note: I know that using a lambda would solve the problem; I want to understand why the problem arises.

5
  • @Ron: Not on my VS2015.
    – Astrinus
    Nov 2 '17 at 8:31
  • 1
    I am using the 2013 version which doesn't support the C++14 standard. Probably time to upgrade.
    – Ron
    Nov 2 '17 at 8:32
  • @Ron: it is C++11, actually... but you should upgrade anyway because support of C++11 by VS2013 is partial (I remember that when I switched to VS2015 I forgot frustration and nightmares about things that should have worked and they didn't, especially for code portable across compilers)
    – Astrinus
    Nov 2 '17 at 8:50
  • 1
    @Ron, if I recall correctly older VS's allowed binding lvalue references to modifiable temporaries ( probably, the int is stored in a tuple internally ), hence it compiles Nov 2 '17 at 8:55
  • Nit: Not a MNWE because the std::string argument is not required.
    – Arne Vogel
    Nov 2 '17 at 13:10
6

std::thread stores copies of the arguments it is passed. Which as Massimiliano Janes pointed out, is evaluated in the context of the caller to a temporary. For all intents and purposes, it's better to consider it as a const object.

Since x is a non-const reference, it cannot bind to the argument being fed to it by the thread.

If you want x to refer to i, you need to use std::reference_wrapper.

#include <thread>
#include <string>
#include <functional>

static void foo(std::string , int & )
{
  while(true);
}

int main() {
 int i = 1;
 auto thd = std::thread(foo, std::string("bar"), std::ref(i));
 thd.join();
}

Live Example

The utility std::ref will create it on the fly.

8
  • 1
    @MassimilianoJanes - They are copied/moved by value. For all intents and purposed... But I'll clarify Nov 2 '17 at 8:32
  • 1
    @MassimilianoJanes - Yes, I heard you the first time. And already edited Nov 2 '17 at 8:35
  • "it's better to consider it as a const object" can you elaborate ? are you suggesting to avoid taking an rvalue reference ? if yes, why ? Nov 2 '17 at 8:45
  • @MassimilianoJanes - I do. Because it creates ad-hoc "state" for the thread. If the thread needs a modifiable integer, it should be part of the callable. Not an rvalue reference to a temporary created outside the thread context itself. Nov 2 '17 at 8:47
  • @MassimilianoJanes - Or at the very least, it should be a by-value parameter. Because that makes clear the fact that i's local to the thread. The rvalue reference is an eyebrow raiser. Nov 2 '17 at 8:51
3

std::thread constructor performs a decay_copy on its arguments before invoking the callable perfect-forwarding the result to it; in your foo, you're trying to bind a lvalue reference (int& x) to an rvalue reference (to the temporary), hence the error; either take an int, an int const& or an int&& instead ( or pass a reference wrapper ).

2

Following on from StoryTeller's answer, a lambda may offer a clearer way to express this:

I think there are a couple of scenarios:

If we really do want to pass a reference to i in our outer scope:

 auto thd = std::thread([&i]
 {
     foo("bar", i);
 });

And if foo taking a reference just happens to be an historical accident:

 auto thd = std::thread([]() mutable
 {
     int i = 1;
     foo("bar", i);
 });

In the second form, we have localised the variable i and reduced the risk that it will be read or written to outside the thread (which would be UB).

3
  • 1
    Oh, I love the daisy chain of answers that is happening here :) +1 for those points about clarity. My thoughts exactly Nov 2 '17 at 9:33
  • "Please note: I know that using a lambda would solve the problem; I want to understand why the problem arises."
    – Astrinus
    Nov 2 '17 at 10:02
  • @Astrinus I see your point. The reason for needing std::ref is that the function object built by std::thread cannot 'know' whether it needs to capture by reference or by value, so by value is assumed (because it's safer and more logical) unless the argument type is a specialisation of std::reference_wrapper. Essentially specifying [&i] in a lambda is equivalent to passing the return type of std::ref(i) Nov 2 '17 at 13:45

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