I played around with Godbolt's CompilerExplorer. I wanted to see how good certain optimizations are. My minimum working example is:

#include <vector>

int foo() {
    std::vector<int> v {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    return v[4];
}

The generated assembler (by clang 5.0.0, -O2 -std=c++14):

foo(): # @foo()
  push rax
  mov edi, 20
  call operator new(unsigned long)
  mov rdi, rax
  call operator delete(void*)
  mov eax, 5
  pop rcx
  ret

As one can see, clang knows the answer, but does quite a lot of stuff before returning. It seems to my that even the vector is created, because of "operator new/delete".

Can anyone explain to me what happens here and why it does not just return?

The code generated by GCC (not copied here) seems to construct the vector explicitly. Does anyone know GCC is not capable to deduce the result?

  • 15
    I think C++ compiler is not yet allowed to remove calls to global operator new and operator delete. There was a proposal that would allow compiler doing this, I am not sure if it made into a standard. Don't forget that both global operators can be overriden. – Ivan Nov 2 '17 at 9:59
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    @Max Görner Defining a vector has a side effect of allocating memory that can be not enough. – Vlad from Moscow Nov 2 '17 at 10:01
  • 3
    Standard Library calls are generally considered observable effects which are barred from elimination, or even reordering. – MSalters Nov 2 '17 at 10:01
  • 3
    There might be an overload of global operator new/delete in another translation unit that causes side effects – M.M Nov 2 '17 at 10:02
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    Everything the guys above me said, really belongs in an answer – StoryTeller Nov 2 '17 at 10:04
up vote 29 down vote accepted

std::vector<T> is a fairly complicated class that involves dynamic allocation. While clang++ is sometimes able to elide heap allocations, it is a fairly tricky optimization and you should not rely on it. Example:

int foo() {
    int* p = new int{5};
    return *p;
}
foo():                                # @foo()
        mov     eax, 5
        ret

As an example, using std::array<T> (which does not dynamically allocate) produces fully-inlined code:

#include <array>

int foo() {
    std::array v{1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    return v[4];
}
foo():                                # @foo()
        mov     eax, 5
        ret

As Marc Glisse noted in the other answer's comments, this is what the Standard says in [expr.new] #10:

An implementation is allowed to omit a call to a replaceable global allocation function ([new.delete.single], [new.delete.array]). When it does so, the storage is instead provided by the implementation or provided by extending the allocation of another new-expression. The implementation may extend the allocation of a new-expression e1 to provide storage for a new-expression e2 if the following would be true were the allocation not extended: [...]

  • but the problem is, what does the standard say about allowing such optimizations ? for example, if you make that int* volatile the new is not optimized, suggesting that clang considers the evaluation of new not an observable sideeffect by itself, but is this correct ? – Massimiliano Janes Nov 2 '17 at 10:36
  • @MassimilianoJanes: I think these optimizations fall under the as if rule. If clang can figure out the the observable behavior doesn't change, it can elide things like new and delete. – Vittorio Romeo Nov 2 '17 at 10:43
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    according to Clarifying Memory Allocation it has not always been so clear-cut whether these are observable or not. It would be interesting to see exactly what has changed since then ... – Massimiliano Janes Nov 2 '17 at 10:58

As the comments note, operator new can be replaced. This can happen in any Translation Unit. Optimizing a program for the case it's not replaced therefore requires Whole-Program Analysis. And if it is replaced, you have to call it of course.

Whether the default operator new is a library I/O call is unspecified. That matters, because library I/O calls are observable and therefore they can't be optimized out either.

  • I'm not sure that std::vector is required to call std::allocator::allocate. For example, SSO is allowable. – Richard Hodges Nov 2 '17 at 10:19
  • There was a proposal that tries to allow compiler from removing paired call to new and delete, regardless of whether they replaced or not. Moreover it was supposed to be allowed to replace small heap allocations with allocation on stack. This is an optimization that languages as Java and C# are capable of, but not C++. Or at least I am not sure if this was added to C++ standard and if compilers do this or not. Ofc such optimization is that as relevant for C++ as for Java and C#. – Ivan Nov 2 '17 at 10:20
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    @RichardHodges: SSO is not allowed for vector, because swapping two small vectors would then require swapping their elements, and swap for containers is not allowed to move, copy or swap any elements (array is an exception, and string is not really a container; see [container.requirements.general]/9). – Fanael Nov 2 '17 at 10:27
  • @Fanael I see, thank you. So we're left with a custom stack-based allocator to get this optimisation. – Richard Hodges Nov 2 '17 at 10:30
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    "An implementation is allowed to omit a call to a replaceable global allocation function" <-- directly from the standard [expr.new] – Marc Glisse Nov 2 '17 at 10:56

N3664's change to [expr.new], cited in one answer and one comment, permits new-expressions to not call a replaceable global allocation function. But vector allocates memory using std::allocator<T>::allocate, which calls ::operator new directly, not via a new-expression. So that special permission doesn't apply, and generally compilers cannot elide such direct calls to ::operator new.

All hope is not lost, however, for std::allocator<T>::allocate's specification has this to say:

Remarks: the storage is obtained by calling ​::​operator new, but it is unspecified when or how often this function is called.

Leveraging this permission, libc++'s std::allocator uses special clang built-ins to indicate to the compiler that elision is permitted. With -stdlib=libc++, clang compiles your code down to

foo():                                # @foo()
        mov     eax, 5
        ret
  • When I asked in February, Richard Smith, one of the authors of N3664, replied that indeed the wording in the library, taken literally, does not provide the liberties we want, but the intention was always to give the same liberties as with new-expressions, and someone should fix the text to match the intent. – Marc Glisse Nov 3 '17 at 21:46
  • @MarcGlisse Perhaps, but so far the set of "someone"s is an empty set. – T.C. Nov 7 '17 at 19:45
  • Feel free to volunteer and send updated wording to the committee... – Marc Glisse Nov 7 '17 at 19:57

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