As far as compiler optimizations go, is it legal and/or possible to change a heap allocation to a stack allocation? Or would that break the as-if rule?

For example, say this is the original version of the code

{
    Foo* f = new Foo();
    f->do_something();
    delete f;
}

Would a compiler be able to change this to the following

{
    Foo f{};
    f.do_something();
}

I wouldn't think so, because that would have implications if the original version was relying on things like custom allocators. Does the standard say anything specifically about this?

  • 67
    No, that goes too far. Growing stack usage is a big deal, they did name a popular programming web site after it. – Hans Passant Nov 2 '17 at 12:58
  • 4
    Related. – nwp Nov 2 '17 at 12:59
  • 2
    related: stackoverflow.com/questions/47072261/… – user463035818 Nov 2 '17 at 13:03
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    Clang does optimize this iff it can inline the function that's called (+ some conditions on the function body probably). godbolt.org/g/hnAMTZ – Baum mit Augen Nov 2 '17 at 13:18
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    from the link mentioned by tobi303, things have changed since c++14, see [expr.new]; from c++14 on, the compiler can store Foo in the stack as long as it can prove the same behaviour (eg. nothing is thrown in do_something) – Massimiliano Janes Nov 2 '17 at 13:21
up vote 50 down vote accepted

Yes, it's legal. expr.new/10 of C++14:

An implementation is allowed to omit a call to a replaceable global allocation function (18.6.1.1, 18.6.1.2). When it does so, the storage is instead provided by the implementation or provided by extending the allocation of another new-expression.

expr.delete/7:

If the value of the operand of the delete-expression is not a null pointer value, then:

— If the allocation call for the new-expression for the object to be deleted was not omitted and the allocation was not extended (5.3.4), the delete-expression shall call a deallocation function (3.7.4.2). The value returned from the allocation call of the new-expression shall be passed as the first argument to the deallocation function.

— Otherwise, if the allocation was extended or was provided by extending the allocation of another new- expression, and the delete-expression for every other pointer value produced by a new-expression that had storage provided by the extended new-expression has been evaluated, the delete-expression shall call a deallocation function. The value returned from the allocation call of the extended new-expression shall be passed as the first argument to the deallocation function.

— Otherwise, the delete-expression will not call a deallocation function (3.7.4.2).

So, in summary, it's legal to replace new and delete with something implementation defined, like using the stack instead of heap.

Note: As Massimiliano Janes comments, the compiler could not stick exactly to this transformation for your sample, if do_something throws: the compiler should omit destructor call of f in this case (while your transformed sample does call the destructor in this case). But other than that, it is free to put f into the stack.

  • 1
    The question is if the allocation can be on stack even if new used. If I understand correctly it will always be dynamic memory and never on the stack. the given paragraph say that the size of allocation can be extended to a larger block of dynamic memory, or use previous extention of dynamic memory. – SHR Nov 2 '17 at 13:55
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    @SHR: I've put emphasis on "storage is instead provided by the implementation". It can be anything, even the stack. – geza Nov 2 '17 at 14:00
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    The background to these changes is discussed in my answer to Is the compiler allowed to optimize out heap memory allocations? – Shafik Yaghmour Nov 3 '17 at 16:42

These are not equivalent. f.do_something() might throw, in which case the first object remains in memory, the second gets destructed.

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    Worth noting that declaring the function noexcept does not help the optimizers of gcc and clang, but showing clang the function body does. There is probably more to this. – Baum mit Augen Nov 2 '17 at 13:33
  • @BaummitAugen If you're asking "why do compilers not perform this optimization" I think there is indeed more to it: when someone writes a new-expression they want dynamic allocation. If they wanted stack allocation they would have written Foo f{}. There are valid reasons for this and the compiler cannot know, e.g. perhaps they are running under valgrind and want to track all heap usages, or perhaps they are debugging a heap fragmentation problem. The compiler has to strike a balance between permitted optimizations, and what coders really want. The compiler should be a friend, not a foe – M.M Nov 3 '17 at 0:32

I'd like to point out something IMO not stressed enough in the other answers:

struct Foo {
    static void * operator new(std::size_t count) {
        std::cout << "Hey ho!" << std::endl;
        return ::operator new(count);
    }
};

An allocation new Foo() cannot generally be replaced, because:

An implementation is allowed to omit a call to a replaceable global allocation function (18.6.1.1, 18.6.1.2). When it does so, the storage is instead provided by the implementation or provided by extending the allocation of another new-expression.

Thus, like in the Foo example above, the Foo::operator new needs to be called. Omitting this call would change the observable behavior of the program.

Real world example: Foos might need to reside in some special memory region (like memory mapped IO) to function properly.

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