I would like a code block within a nested regex to be executed only if the whole pattern matches.

Here's my test code.

my regex left {
    | a  { take "left: 'a' matched" }
    | aa { take "left: 'aa' matched" }
}
my regex right { b }
my regex whole {
    ^
    <left>
    <right>
    $
}

my $string = 'aab';
my @left_history = gather
      $string ~~ m:ex/ <whole> /;

.say for @left_history;

As expected, it produces the following output:

left: 'aa' matched
left: 'a' matched

But I want it to print only the 1st line, corresponding to the value of left, which was used in the successful match. Is it possible?

(Of course, I understand that I can extract the successful values of <left> from the $/ match variable)

UPD: In general, :ex or :g produce many matches, so I'd like the code block in the nested regex to be executed during each successful match of the whole pattern.

  • 2
    I have to run but a quick note. Aiui the point of the :ex matching option is to try to match all alternations rather than just pick a winner. Thus switching to, say, my regex left { [ | a | aa ] { take "left: $/ matched" } }, which only takes whichever successfully matched, still prints both because :ex tells the regex engine to keep trying to match all alternations. – raiph Nov 2 '17 at 14:41
  • @raiph I think the same, so I wonder whether there is some solution. – Eugene Barsky Nov 2 '17 at 16:47
  • "But I want it to print only the 1st line, corresponding to the value of left, which was used in the successful match." The 2nd line corresponds to the value of left in the second successful match. If you only want one successful match, don't use :ex. I realize you must mean something else, and I've reread your question a couple times to try and figure out what that else is, but at the moment I'm confused. Could you explain why you're using :ex, which by definition generates a list of N successful matches yet using the phrase "successful match", which is singular, not plural? – raiph Nov 2 '17 at 21:22
  • 2
    @raiph I've finally got it with your kind help and made an answer – Eugene Barsky Nov 3 '17 at 8:48
  • 1
    I think a simple fix is to use token rather than regex – Brad Gilbert Jul 25 at 20:57

The following modification of the program is based on @raiph's very useful explanations. It's not an entirely general answer to the original question, but it solves my problems, so I venture to post it as an answer. Any corrections and improvements are very welcome!

my regex left {
    | a   { $*left_history = "left: 'a' matched" }
    | aa  { $*left_history = "left: 'aa' matched" }
    | aab { $*left_history = "left: 'aab' matched" }
}
my regex right { b }
my regex whole {
    :my $*left_history;
    ^
    <left>
    <right>
    $
    { take $*left_history }
}

my $string = 'aab';
my @left_history = gather
      $string ~~ m:ex/ <whole> /;

.say for @left_history;

Output:

left: 'aa' matched

It would be better if the scope of the variable would be restricted to whole and left, but I don't know how to do it.

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