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I'm running Bash with iTerm on a Mac OS X and for some reason I can't seem to customize the colors in my prompt. I'm editing my .bashrc and here's what I've got in there at the moment:

ls --color=always
export LS_COLORS='rs=0:di=01;34:ln=01;36:mh=00:pi=40;33'
PS1='\e[33;1m\u@\h: \e[31m\W\e[0m\$ '


export TERM=xterm-color
export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=auto' GREP_COLOR='1;32'
export CLICOLOR=1
export LSCOLORS=ExFxCxDxBxegedabagacad

export COLOR_NC='\e[0m' # No Color
export COLOR_WHITE='\e[1;37m'
export COLOR_BLACK='\e[0;30m'
export COLOR_BLUE='\e[0;34m'
export COLOR_LIGHT_BLUE='\e[1;34m'
export COLOR_GREEN='\e[0;32m'
export COLOR_LIGHT_GREEN='\e[1;32m'
export COLOR_CYAN='\e[0;36m'
export COLOR_LIGHT_CYAN='\e[1;36m'
export COLOR_RED='\e[0;31m'
export COLOR_LIGHT_RED='\e[1;31m'
export COLOR_PURPLE='\e[0;35m'
export COLOR_LIGHT_PURPLE='\e[1;35m'
export COLOR_BROWN='\e[0;33m'
export COLOR_YELLOW='\e[1;33m'
export COLOR_GRAY='\e[0;30m'
export COLOR_LIGHT_GRAY='\e[0;37m'

In theory that should at least do SOMETHING. Does anyone have an idea as to why I'm not able to get these colors to appear (even after quitting and reloading)?

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  • Are you sure that it's reloading .bashrc each time you edit it? Try source ~/.bashrc
    – MrJLP
    Nov 3, 2017 at 0:06

2 Answers 2

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In OSX 10.11.x bash and Terminal, the file accessed eg with PS1 prompt coding etc, is the .bash_profile, not .bashrc. Could this be the source of the issue with iTerm?

When I customize my prompt, it is the .bash_profile that I edit.

However take note of the comment by – user1934428

If I remember right, you can configure in iTerm, what shell is executed, and how it is executed, so there is no general rule. Since there is a difference in interactive login-shells and interactive non-login-shells, a common practice is to put all commands which make sense in an interactive shell only, neither into .bashrc nor into .bash_profile, but into a separate file, which is sourced from both .bashrc and .bash_profile. Another option is to put it into .bashrc and to source .bashrc from .bash_profile.

You may also want to put some backslash-squarebracket around your non printing characters in your PS1 to avoid poor wrapping in Terminal, and possibly iTerm. See https://stackoverflow.com/questions/11831296/os-x-terminal-text-stacking-on-top-of-itself.

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  • This depends how bash is invoked. From the bash man page: When an interactive shell that is not a login shell is started, bash reads and executes commands from ~/.bashrc, if that file exists. This may be inhibited by using the --norc option. The --rcfile file option will force bash to read and execute commands from file instead of ~/.bashrc. Nov 3, 2017 at 6:37
  • OK thanks @user1934428 , learning new things. So would this be the case if he/she is using iTerm? If so, this means my answer is not helpful or best answer. Wait to see if there is a better answer from someone.
    – Cam_Aust
    Nov 3, 2017 at 6:43
  • Right now I don't have a Mac here, but if I remember right, you can configure in iTerm, what shell is executed, and how it is executed, so there is no general rule. Since there is a difference in interactive login-shells and interactive non-login-shells, a common practice is to put all commands which make sense in an interactive shell only, neither into .bashrc nor into .bash_profile, but into a separate file, which is sourced from both .bashrc and .bash_profile. Another option is to put it into .bashrc and to source .bashrc from .bash_profile. Nov 3, 2017 at 11:14
  • Will wait on OP to check for a solution from your excellent comments. Then either you or he turn into a posted answer.
    – Cam_Aust
    Nov 3, 2017 at 14:26
  • @user1934428 I have incorporated your comments into my answer, and acknowledged you. Thanks.
    – Cam_Aust
    Nov 6, 2017 at 6:17
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It's possible that your terminal is loading its configuration from a different file, perhaps the default .bashrc, which I believe is in /etc. It's also possible that the terminal isn't using .bashrc at all and instead .Xresources or .Xdefaults.

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  • 1
    The configuration is loaded by the shell, not the terminal. .Xresources and .Xdefaults are X11 configuration files, which do not affect the shell, and certainly do not affect native macOS applications.
    – user149341
    Nov 3, 2017 at 5:00
  • @Dumbassahedratron yep, no problem. I learned something. All helps.
    – Cam_Aust
    Nov 3, 2017 at 9:02

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