38

I am using Docker version 17.09.0-ce I see that containers are marked as unhealthy incase of health check failures.

Is there an option to get the container restart instead of keeping the container as unhealthy.

  • I think that would happens when you launch it in docker swarm mode and run it as a service and not for a normal docker container – Tarun Lalwani Nov 3 '17 at 8:04
  • 1
    I am not using swarm or any orchestration tools for some specific reasons. – Govind Kailas Nov 4 '17 at 12:06
  • Then you can use another script using docker events -f event=health_status (docs.docker.com/engine/reference/commandline/events/…) and then take action based on health of the container – Tarun Lalwani Nov 4 '17 at 12:19
54

Restarting of unhealty container feature was in the original PR (https://github.com/moby/moby/pull/22719), but was removed after a discussion and considered to be done later as enhancement of RestartPolicy.

At this moment you can use this workaround to automatically restarting unhealty containers: https://hub.docker.com/r/willfarrell/autoheal/

Here is a sample compose file:

version: '2'
services:
  autoheal:
    restart: always
    image: willfarrell/autoheal
    environment:
      - AUTOHEAL_CONTAINER_LABEL=all
    volumes:
      - /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock

Simply execute docker-compose up -d on this

  • Won't this make it so you can't specify your own image name? Also is the environment or volume necessary? The volume doesn't seem relevant. Can you use this image as a dependency? – obesechicken13 May 24 '18 at 21:54
  • 1
    @obesechicken13 the volume is so that the docker socket is available to the running container internally – Connor Oct 19 '18 at 2:25
3

For standalone containers, Docker does not have native integration to restart the container on health check failure though we can achieve the same using Docker events and a script. Health check is better integrated with Swarm. With health check integrated to Swarm, when a container in a service is unhealthy, Swarm automatically shuts down the unhealthy container and starts a new container to maintain the container count as specified in the replica count of a service.

1

Docker has a couple of ways to get details on container health. You can configure health checks and how often they run. Also, health checks can be run on applications running inside a container, like http (this would use curl --fail option.) You can view the health_status event to get details.

For detailed information on an unhealthy container the inspect command comes in handy, docker inspect --format='{{json .State.Health}}' container-name (see https://blog.newrelic.com/2016/08/24/docker-health-check-instruction/ for more details.)

You should resolve the error condition causing the "unhealthy" tag (anytime the health check command runs and gets an exit code of 1) first. This may or may not require that Docker restart the container, depending on the error. If you are starting/restarting your containers automatically, then either trapping the start errors or logging them and the health check status can help address errors quickly. Check the link if you are interested in auto start.

  • If you are on windows you will have to use double quotes, or it won't work: docker inspect --format="{{json .State.Health}}" name-of-your-container – AbsolutelyFreeWeb Jan 31 at 19:38
0

According to https://codeblog.dotsandbrackets.com/docker-health-check/

Create container and add " restart: always".

In the use of healthcheck, pay attention to the following points:

For standalone containers, Docker does not have native integration to restart the container on health check failure though we can achieve the same using Docker events and a script. Health check is better integrated with Swarm. With health check integrated to Swarm, when a container in a service is unhealthy, Swarm automatically shuts down the unhealthy container and starts a new container to maintain the container count as specified in the replica count of a service.

  • 2
    Please put all of your answer in the response rather than links. – Rob Anthony Feb 2 '18 at 8:53
  • 1
    I solved this problem. In the use of healthcheck, pay attention to the following points For standalone containers, Docker does not have native integration to restart the container on health check failure though we can achieve the same using Docker events and a script. Health check is better integrated with Swarm. With health check integrated to Swarm, when a container in a service is unhealthy, Swarm automatically shuts down the unhealthy container and starts a new container to maintain the container count as specified in the replica count of a service. – Freax Feb 3 '18 at 3:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.