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I am using Docker version 17.09.0-ce, and I see that containers are marked as unhealthy. Is there an option to get the container restart instead of keeping the container as unhealthy?

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  • 1
    I think that would happens when you launch it in docker swarm mode and run it as a service and not for a normal docker container Commented Nov 3, 2017 at 8:04
  • 1
    I am not using swarm or any orchestration tools for some specific reasons. Commented Nov 4, 2017 at 12:06
  • Then you can use another script using docker events -f event=health_status (docs.docker.com/engine/reference/commandline/events/…) and then take action based on health of the container Commented Nov 4, 2017 at 12:19

8 Answers 8

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Restarting of unhealty container feature was in the original PR (https://github.com/moby/moby/pull/22719), but was removed after a discussion and considered to be done later as enhancement of RestartPolicy.

At this moment, you can use this workaround to automatically restart unhealthy containers: https://hub.docker.com/r/willfarrell/autoheal/

Here is a sample compose file:

version: '2'
services:
  autoheal:
    restart: always
    image: willfarrell/autoheal
    environment:
      - AUTOHEAL_CONTAINER_LABEL=all
    volumes:
      - /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock

Simply execute docker-compose up -d on this

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  • Won't this make it so you can't specify your own image name? Also is the environment or volume necessary? The volume doesn't seem relevant. Can you use this image as a dependency? Commented May 24, 2018 at 21:54
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    @obesechicken13 the volume is so that the docker socket is available to the running container internally
    – Connor
    Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 2:25
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    which poses a huge security risk news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17983623
    – InsOp
    Commented Dec 13, 2019 at 11:23
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    There is still an open feature request: trigger restart from unhealthy status
    – cdalxndr
    Commented Jun 13, 2020 at 22:04
  • 5
    @InsOp So what do you propose? How can this be done without giving the container access to Docker?
    – ave
    Commented Dec 30, 2020 at 12:02
54

You can restart automatically an unhealthy container by setting a smart HEALTHCHECK and a proper restart policy.

The Docker restart policy should be one of always or unless-stopped.

The HEALTHCHECK instead should implement a logic that kills the container when it's unhealthy.

In the following example I used curl with its internal retry mechanism and piped it (in case of failure/service unhealthy) to the kill command.

HEALTHCHECK --interval=5m --timeout=2m --start-period=45s \
   CMD curl -f --retry 6 --max-time 5 --retry-delay 10 --retry-max-time 60 "http://localhost:8080/health" || bash -c 'kill -s 15 -1 && (sleep 10; kill -s 9 -1)'

The important step to understand here is that the retry logic is self-contained in the curl command, the Docker retry here actually is mandatory but useless. Then if the curl HTTP request fails 3 times, then kill is executed. First it sends a SIGTERM to all the processes in the container, to allow them to gracefully stop, then after 10 seconds it sends a SIGKILL to completely kill all the processes in the container. It must be noted that when the PID1 of a container dies, then the container itself dies and the restart policy is invoked.

Gotchas: kill behaves differently in bash than in sh. In bash you can use -1 to signal all the processes with PID greater than 1 to die.

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  • cool thanks for the explanation đź‘Ť Let's say the container has already been restarted, but the problem could not be solved... does it not end in an endless loop?
    – Niklas
    Commented Oct 27, 2020 at 20:27
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    Yes, it goes into an endless loop. The only way to stop it would be by docker compose stop or docker compose rm -f. There is a super convoluted alternative to fix this behavior. Which is: mount the Docker socket inside the container, implement the retry logic in a .sh file inside the container, write a counter on a volume so that it's persisted and when the counter is greater than your number of attempts use the docker socket to send a stop message to the container itself. :)
    – Naramsim
    Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 8:37
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    @cdalxndr healthcheck retries is for a different purpose than what @naramsim is explaining here in comments. Commented Jan 22, 2022 at 7:29
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    @Naramsim as pointed in your Gotchas, -1 signals all processes besides init (PID 1). Hence my container is not dying + no restart. what I'm I missing here? Even if I send TERM or SIGKILL to PID 1 explicitly it will be ignored Commented Jan 26, 2022 at 3:01
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    Could be worth adding --retry-connrefused as option to the curl command. Otherwise if the server isn't up for some reason curl will fail on first try Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 12:51
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Unhealthy docker containers may be restarted with simple crontab rule:

* * * * * docker ps -f health=unhealthy --format "docker restart {{.ID}}" | sh
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    Probably safer to do docker ps -q -f health=unhealthy | xargs docker restart rather than invoking a shell.
    – slhck
    Commented Jun 27, 2023 at 6:57
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    Also, for when there's no unhealthy containers use the -r or --no-run-if-empty flag for xargs, like: docker ps -q -f health=unhealthy | xargs --no-run-if-empty docker restart Commented Nov 13, 2023 at 21:27
13

For standalone containers, Docker does not have native integration to restart the container on health check failure though we can achieve the same using Docker events and a script. Health check is better integrated with Swarm. With health check integrated to Swarm, when a container in a service is unhealthy, Swarm automatically shuts down the unhealthy container and starts a new container to maintain the container count as specified in the replica count of a service.

13

You can try put in your Dockerfile something like this:

HEALTHCHECK --interval=5s --timeout=2s CMD curl --fail http://localhost || kill 1

Don't forget --restart always option.

kill 1 will kill process with pid 1 in container and force container exit. Usually the process started by CMD or ENTRYPOINT has pid 1.

Unfortunally, this method likely don't change container's state to unhealthy, so be careful with it.

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  • 2
    Isn't this killing the container at the very first failed curl?
    – Naramsim
    Commented Jul 22, 2020 at 10:07
  • @Naramsim You right, first curl fail will kill the container, but with --restart always it will be resurrected. Also, as docs say, "The health check will first run interval seconds after the container is started". Therefore increasing interval will prevent first fast failure if container is starting too long.
    – What
    Commented Aug 28, 2020 at 16:29
  • I answered to this question with a proper way to restart an unhealthy container.
    – Naramsim
    Commented Sep 24, 2020 at 7:57
6

According to https://codeblog.dotsandbrackets.com/docker-health-check/

Create container and add " restart: always".

In the use of healthcheck, pay attention to the following points:

For standalone containers, Docker does not have native integration to restart the container on health check failure though we can achieve the same using Docker events and a script. Health check is better integrated with Swarm. With health check integrated to Swarm, when a container in a service is unhealthy, Swarm automatically shuts down the unhealthy container and starts a new container to maintain the container count as specified in the replica count of a service.

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    Please put all of your answer in the response rather than links. Commented Feb 2, 2018 at 8:53
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    I solved this problem. In the use of healthcheck, pay attention to the following points For standalone containers, Docker does not have native integration to restart the container on health check failure though we can achieve the same using Docker events and a script. Health check is better integrated with Swarm. With health check integrated to Swarm, when a container in a service is unhealthy, Swarm automatically shuts down the unhealthy container and starts a new container to maintain the container count as specified in the replica count of a service.
    – myfreax
    Commented Feb 3, 2018 at 3:37
5

Docker has a couple of ways to get details on container health. You can configure health checks and how often they run. Also, health checks can be run on applications running inside a container, like http (this would use curl --fail option.) You can view the health_status event to get details.

For detailed information on an unhealthy container the inspect command comes in handy, docker inspect --format='{{json .State.Health}}' container-name (see https://blog.newrelic.com/2016/08/24/docker-health-check-instruction/ for more details.)

You should resolve the error condition causing the "unhealthy" tag (anytime the health check command runs and gets an exit code of 1) first. This may or may not require that Docker restart the container, depending on the error. If you are starting/restarting your containers automatically, then either trapping the start errors or logging them and the health check status can help address errors quickly. Check the link if you are interested in auto start.

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    If you are on windows you will have to use double quotes, or it won't work: docker inspect --format="{{json .State.Health}}" name-of-your-container Commented Jan 31, 2019 at 19:38
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   unhealthy_container_restarter:
    image: docker:cli
    network_mode: none
    cap_drop:
      - ALL
    volumes: [ "/var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock" ]
    command: [ "/bin/sh", "-c", "while true; do sleep 60; docker ps -q -f health=unhealthy | xargs --no-run-if-empty docker restart; done" ]
    restart: unless-stopped

What this does: each 60 seconds search for unhealthy containers and restart it.

Why not willfarrell/autoheal: This is simpler. From first look at compose file I know what it does and more important 'how'. Compose is not dependent on another image that may be maintained or not in future.

Why not cron: everything is in one file. It's not dependent from external manual job that need to be made.

Alternative

deunhealth

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