18

I'm writing this linked list program with C++

When I test the program, I got the error

linkedlist.cpp:5:24: error: definition of implicitly-declared 'constexpr LinkedList::LinkedList()' LinkedList::LinkedList(){

Here's the code

linkedlist.h file:

#include "node.h"
using namespace std;

class LinkedList {
  Node * head = nullptr;
  int length = 0;
public:
  void add( int );
  bool remove( int );
  int find( int );
  int count( int );
  int at( int );
  int len();
};

linkedlist.cpp file:

#include "linkedlist.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

LinkedList::LinkedList(){
  length = 0;
  head = NULL;
}
/*and all the methods below*/

please help.

1
  • 1
    You dont need the constructor if all you are doing is the iniialization of the members - you already have done that in the header.
    – user2672107
    Nov 3 '17 at 9:50
24

Declare the parameterless constructor in the header file:

class LinkedList {
{
....
public:
    LinkedList();
    ....
}

You are defining it in the .cpp file without actually declaring it. But since the compiler provides such a constructor by default (if no other constructor is declared), the error clearly states that you are trying to define an implicitly-declared constructor.

2
  • but the instruction says that I'm not supposed to modify the header file. Nov 3 '17 at 10:19
  • 2
    If you want to define something, you also need to declare it.
    – CinCout
    Nov 3 '17 at 10:26
1

You should declare the constructor inside the class inorder to define the cunstructor outside the class. Otherwise you should define it inside the class itself.Your class should look like this.

            #include "node.h"
            using namespace std;
            class LinkedList {
              Node * head = nullptr;
              int length = 0;
            public:
              LinkedList();
              void add( int );
              bool remove( int );
              int find( int );
              int count( int );
              int at( int );
              int len();
            };
0

To define constructor outside the class you need to declare it first in public specifier then define it outside the class.

#include "node.h"
using namespace std;

class LinkedList {
  Node * head = nullptr;
  int length = 0;
public:
  LinkedList();
  void add( int );
  bool remove( int );
  int find( int );
  int count( int );
  int at( int );
  int len();
};


LinkedList::LinkedList(){
  length = 0;
  head = NULL;
}
0

        "I came across this question a while back in 2018, and even though it was an extremely simply question, with an extremely simple answer, it didn't help me much. Reflecting back on it, I didn't realize how pedantic C++ compilers are. Because this question is one that's referenced by new programmers, I want to answer it as such, as an attempt to help some of the people where I was a small while back (couple years ago)."




WHAT DOES     ERROR: implicitly-declared ...     MEAN?


        This error specifically means, that the function your attempting to compile IS NOT EXPLICITLY BEING DEFINED IN YOUR CLASS. Look up the English definitions for Implicit & Explicit if you need to.

        This can be a very frustrating 'compiler error' to experience for a person who hasn't had a lot of experience writing code, this is mainly due to the fact that its likely going to be one of the first error-types that new-learners will run into, and have to learn to troubleshoot. Troubleshooting implicitly declared errors is not hard, and the process is always the same. The first step to take when troubleshooting implicitly defined errors is to check your class. When checking your class, you want to check it for the definition of the entity that the error is complaining about, for example:

Lets say hypothetically there was an error that displayed a message that read like this:

ERROR: Implicitly declared "const sumClassName sumClassName::sumFuncName(const int &foo)" is not allowed!

Then that means you need to immediately, before you do anything else, check and see if you have indeed added the declaration of "const className::sumFuncName(const int foo)" to your class

NOTE: sumClassName, sumFuncName, & foo will obviously be replaced with the names of the class and function you have defined.



Are you getting the error, despite having properly declared the function in your class?


You need to be extremely pedantic in this situation — look up pedantic if you need to, its an important word to know when debugging.

The excerpt below might be a bit much for an old-timer to read, but hopefully it puts defining code for a C++ compiler into perspective for some people. 99/100 times, when you are receiving an error message, telling you that you have "implicitly declared something" its because you made a mistake in your syntax. And if the mistake is not the total absence of a declaration, its likely the absence of some piece of syntax in a declaration's function-signature, or in a definition's function-signature.

Its extremely important to understand how pedantic a C++ compiler is, or rather, how pedantic the C++ language is. You yourself need to have a pedantic nature. When I started programming, I often got things mixed up, and I referenced this very question while stuck on an implicitly defined error. This is what I didn't understand at the time. When writing a function (and/or method), you have to define how it will be passed data, if the data will be mutable, or immutable, where the value being returned from. You also have to define whether it has access to the classes members, or if it is a class member (friend function/member function), you have to define if it can be publicly accessed, offers limited access, or if its totally inaccessible by non-members. Then you have to define all the more obvious parts like the function's return type, your parameters, the parameters types, the mutability of the parameters, the pass by value or pass by reference of the parameters. Only after all that can you continue to write the definition outside of the class for your function. When you do go to define the function outside the class, if one of the things I just mentioned is off, your going to make the compiler think that your defining a different function than the one you declared, which is why it throws an implicitly defined error, because it doesn't have a declaration to match it against.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.