-1

I have an assignment that was to make a subclass which adds on to the existing super class, and this is run by a third class with a main method which creates an object of the subclass and calls appropriate methods.

My problem is that calling methods in the super class works correctly, but calling the two additional methods I have written in the subclass gets ignored.

I've checked, and the main method IS getting to the if statement which calls the new method in the subclass, but this method is not executing.

Specifically the superclass is a memory calculator with basic add, subtract, divide, and multiply options, as well as an option to clear the current value. The subclass is a scientific memory calculator that overrides the menu method in the superclass to include options for power and logarithm, and has methods for both.

When I choose the option for power, it is simply returning the current value and not raising that power to the number specified.

Superclass:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class MemoryCalc {
    private double currentValue = 0;
    public static int displayMenu() {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Menu\n1. Add\n2. Subtract\n3. Multiply\n4. Divide\n5. Clear\n6. Quit\nWhat would you like to do? ");
        int menuChoice = input.nextInt();
        while (menuChoice < 1 || menuChoice > 6) {
            System.out.print("Please enter a valid option.\n\n");
            System.out.print("Menu\n1. Add\n2. Subtract\n3. Multiply\n4. Divide\n5. Clear\n6. Quit\nWhat would you like to do? ");
            menuChoice = input.nextInt();
        }
        return menuChoice;  
    }
    public static double getOperand(String prompt) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print(prompt);
        double operand = input.nextDouble();
        return operand;
    }
    public double getCurrentValue() {
        return currentValue;
    }
    public void add(double operand2) {
        currentValue = currentValue + operand2;
    }
    public void subtract(double operand2) {
        currentValue = currentValue - operand2;
    }
    public void multiply(double operand2) {
        currentValue = currentValue * operand2;
    }
    public void divide(double operand2) {
        if (operand2 == 0) {
            currentValue = Double.NaN;
        }
        else currentValue = currentValue / operand2;

    }
    public void clear() {
        currentValue = 0;
    }
}

Subclass:

import java.util.Scanner;

public final class ScientificMemCalc extends MemoryCalc {
    private double currentValue = 0;
    public static int displayMenu() {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        int menuChoice = -1;

        while (menuChoice < 1 || menuChoice > 8) {

            System.out.println();
            System.out.println("Menu");
            System.out.println("1. Add");
            System.out.println("2. Subtract");
            System.out.println("3. Multiply");
            System.out.println("4. Divide");
            System.out.println("5. Power");
            System.out.println("6. Logarithm");
            System.out.println("7. Clear");
            System.out.println("8. Quit");
            System.out.println();
            System.out.print("What would you like to do? ");

            menuChoice = input.nextInt();

            if (menuChoice < 1 || menuChoice > 8) {
                System.out.println(menuChoice + " wasn't one of the options");
            }
        }

        return menuChoice;
    }
    public void power(double operand2) {
        currentValue = Math.pow(currentValue, operand2);
    }
    public void logarithm() {
        currentValue = Math.log(currentValue);
    }
}

Main Method:

public class ScientificCalcDriver {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ScientificMemCalc calculator1 = new ScientificMemCalc();
        int menuChoice = 0;
        while (menuChoice != 8) {
            System.out.print("The current value is " + calculator1.getCurrentValue() + "\n");
            menuChoice = ScientificMemCalc.displayMenu();
            if (menuChoice < 6) {
                double Operand2 = ScientificMemCalc.getOperand("What is the second number? ");

                if (menuChoice == 1) {
                    calculator1.add(Operand2);
                }
                if (menuChoice == 2) {
                    calculator1.subtract(Operand2);
                }
                if (menuChoice == 3) {
                    calculator1.multiply(Operand2);
                }
                if (menuChoice == 4) {
                    calculator1.divide(Operand2);
                }
                if (menuChoice == 5) {
                    calculator1.power(Operand2);
                }
            }
            else if (menuChoice == 6) {
                calculator1.logarithm();
            }
            else if (menuChoice == 7) {
                calculator1.clear();
            }
            else if (menuChoice == 8) {
                System.out.print("Goodbye!");
                System.exit(0);
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 4
    Things will be easier if you add the relevant code. – Evan Knowles Nov 3 '17 at 21:48
  • Will do, just was afraid of making the post too long. – Steve Stillwell Nov 3 '17 at 21:49
  • 2
    We don't need all your code, just the relevant parts. Ideally a minimal reproducible example. – azurefrog Nov 3 '17 at 21:50
  • My apologies if this was too much. I'm still very new to Java and programming in general, so I'm not entirely sure what could be relevant or not. – Steve Stillwell Nov 3 '17 at 21:56
2

You've got two different currentValue variables, both private, one in the superclass and one in the subclass. The methods in your superclass are changing the value of its variable, and the methods of the subclass are changing the value of its variable.

Make currentValue protected in the superclass, and remove it from the subclass.

Update:

Based on the "must be private" comment: You still need to remove the extra currentValue variable in the subclass, but as Oleg points out, you can obtain and update the value of a private variable in a superclass using get and set methods defined in the superclass.

  • Thank you so much! Works perfectly now. I guess I need to read through this chapter again since I seemed to have missed that. – Steve Stillwell Nov 3 '17 at 22:03
  • @SteveStillwell don't forget you can accept the answer to mark it as the one that solved your problem – WOUNDEDStevenJones Nov 3 '17 at 22:05
  • 1
    Thanks, I finally found the button for that. I changed the title of the question to more accurately describe the issue. – Steve Stillwell Nov 3 '17 at 22:07
  • Well in checking over the assignment criteria I've encountered a problem. The instructor specifies that the currentValue field in the superclass must be private. This means that the methods added in the subclass won't work. How can I get that currentValue in the subclass if it's private in the superclass? – Steve Stillwell Nov 3 '17 at 22:51
  • 1
    Ah, I think I figured it out. In the methods for power and logarithm I simply used setCurrentValue(Math.pow(getCurrentValue(), operand2)); – Steve Stillwell Nov 3 '17 at 23:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.