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I'm encountering a strange issue with the Math.Net Numerics library for C#. My code worked perfectly fine until recently (nothing has changed as far as I can tell) but I'm now getting the error message from the title at the line where it tries to calculate the multiple regression.

Each list has 493 double values so does anyone know what I can do to fix these issues?

Vector<double> vectorArrayBuy = CreateVector.Dense(listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(0).OutputBuy.ToArray());

var matrixArrayBuy = CreateMatrix.DenseOfColumnArrays(listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(0).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(1).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(2).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(),
                                listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(3).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(4).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(5).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(6).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(),
                                listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(7).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(8).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(9).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(), listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(10).ListValuesBuy.ToArray(),
                                listMRInfoBuy.ElementAt(11).ListValuesBuy.ToArray());

var itemsBuy = MultipleRegression.NormalEquations(matrixArrayBuy, vectorArrayBuy);
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  • NormalEquations uses Cholesky decomposition en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholesky_decomposition for which matrix should be hernitian and positive definite en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive-definite_matrix. As error message says - your matrix is not.
    – Evk
    Nov 4 '17 at 21:15
  • @Evk Sorry for sounding like an idiot but how do I make sure my matrix is positive definite with math.net numerics and how do I fix it so that it is positive definite?
    – DarthVegan
    Nov 4 '17 at 21:18
  • Your system might be ill-conditioned. What does matrixArrayBuy.ConditionNumber() return? Does it by chance work if instead of MultipleRegression.NormalEquations you use MultipleRegression.QR or MultipleRegression.Svd? Nov 4 '17 at 21:30
  • (maybe NormalEquations should fall back to another decomposition if the matrix is not positive definite) Nov 4 '17 at 21:32
  • Unfortunately my knowledge of this stuff is quite rusty, but I think you can use QR method which uses QR decomposition which does not have such requirements to matrix but is generally slower. Same applies to SVD. But first recheck if your inputs are correct.
    – Evk
    Nov 4 '17 at 21:34
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"Matrix not positive definite" probably means that you have fewer than n independent equations, which in turn means you don't have n independent data, which probably means your data are defective in some way (e.g. they were read in incorrect and they're actually all the same or something like that).

Perhaps you can edit your question to show what are the data you are working with. Maybe you have fewer than n data to start with.

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Just adding a solution for those (like me) who do not remember linear algebra or advanced stats from your school days.

  1. If you haven't already, apply the "Analysis ToolPak" Add-In in Excel
  2. Paste your independent and dependent variables into a worksheet
  3. Go to Data -> Data Analysis -> Regression
  4. Provide the ranges it asks for and run the regression
  5. In the regression results you'll find that one or more p-values or t-stats return an a div/0 or NUM error.
  6. Remove those independent variables from your call to the MathNet regression and run again.

This should fix it.

I then went on to add an iterative try and catch that would remove the independent variables, based upon the specific circumstance, and run it again.

IHTH

-1

I fixed this issue by switching on the fly for the different equations to see which one returned the correct answers and didn't throw this exception. Here is my solution to this problem which I hope helps someone else out.

public Vector<double> CalculateWithQR(Matrix<double> x, Vector<double> y)
    {
        Vector<double> result = null;

        try
        {
            result = MultipleRegression.QR(x, y);

            // check for NaN and infinity
            for (int i = 0; i < result.Count; i++)
            {
                var value = result.ElementAt(i);

                if (Double.IsNaN(value) || Double.IsInfinity(value))
                {
                    return null;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
        }

        return result;
    }

    public Vector<double> CalculateWithNormal(Matrix<double> x, Vector<double> y)
    {
        Vector<double> result = null;

        try
        {
            result = MultipleRegression.NormalEquations(x, y);

            // check for NaN and infinity
            for (int i = 0; i < result.Count; i++)
            {
                var value = result.ElementAt(i);

                if (Double.IsNaN(value) || Double.IsInfinity(value))
                {
                    return null;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
        }

        return result;
    }

    public Vector<double> CalculateWithSVD(Matrix<double> x, Vector<double> y)
    {
        Vector<double> result = null;

        try
        {
            result = MultipleRegression.Svd(x, y);

            // check for NaN and infinity
            for (int i = 0; i < result.Count; i++)
            {
                var value = result.ElementAt(i);

                if (Double.IsNaN(value) || Double.IsInfinity(value))
                {
                    return null;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
        }

        return result;
    }

    public Vector<double> FindBestMRSolution(Matrix<double> x, Vector<double> y)
    {
        Vector<double> result = null;

        try
        {
            result = CalculateWithNormal(x, y);

            if (result != null)
            {
                return result;
            }
            else
            {
                result = CalculateWithSVD(x, y);

                if (result != null)
                {
                    return result;
                }
                else
                {
                    result = CalculateWithQR(x, y);

                    if (result != null)
                    {
                        return result;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            Console.WriteLine(ex.StackTrace);
        }

        return result;
    }
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  • This doesn't make a whole lot of sense. You said that the issue was an exception raised by NormalEquations. If so, why are you checking the return values. You don't get anything back if it raises an exception. I suspect that you haven't got to the bottom of the problem yet, and this trial and error programming is not going to yield benefits long term. Nov 6 '17 at 10:11

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