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I've been reading up on PHP magic methods and trying to better understand them. From the PHP manual it states:

The overloading methods are invoked when interacting with properties or methods that have not been declared or are not visible in the current scope.

I've read up on what "not visible" means:

The visibility of a property, a method or (as of PHP 7.1.0) a constant can be defined by prefixing the declaration with the keywords public, protected or private.

So consider the class below:

<?php
    class MyClass{
        private $x = 1;
        protected $y = 2;
        public $z = 3;

        public __construct(){}

        function __get($name){
           switch(true){
             case ($name == 'x'):
                 return 4;
             case ($name == 'y'):
                 return 5;
             case ($name == 'z'):
                 return 6;
             case ($name == 'w'):
                 return 0;
           }
        }

        function sum(){
            return $this->x + $this->y + $this->z;
        }

    }
?>

So considering the snippets above regarding "visible" and "scope", under what context will the __get magic method get invoked and when will it not?

If I instantiate a new object: $myclass = new MyClass(), will $myclass->sum() return 6 or 15 or something else?

What if I call the $myclass->x, $myclass->y, $myclass->z, will the results be 4, 5 and 3 since x and y are technically not "visible"?

I assume calling $myclass->w will return 0 regardless of scope since it wasn't ever defined as a property of the class to begin with, is that right?

  • 1
    "public function __construct(){}". The closing } of the switch statement is missing. And it is more clear to use it as switch ($name) { case 'x': return 4; case 'y': return 5; } – axiac Nov 5 '17 at 7:39
  • Here is a free hint: dont use magic getters an setters. – tereško Nov 7 '17 at 1:06
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So considering the snippets above regarding "visible" and "scope", under what context will the __get magic method get invoked and when will it not?

The __get method will be invoked when a property is accessed that does not exist on the object, or when a property is accessed from a scope from which it is not accessible. For instance, $obj->foo will always trigger __get, and $obj->x will trigger __get when called from outside the class.

If I instantiate a new object: $myclass = new MyClass(), will $myclass->sum() return 6 or 15 or something else?

It'll return 6 (1 + 2 + 3). $this->x, ->y, and ->z are all accessible from within the class, so the __get method is not triggered here.

What if I call the $myclass->x, $myclass->y, $myclass->z, will the results be 4, 5 and 3 since x and y are technically not "visible"?

Correct.

I assume calling $myclass->w will return 0 regardless of scope since it wasn't ever defined as a property of the class to begin with, is that right?

Correct, so long as you have not explicitly assigned a value to $myclass->w.

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class MyClass {
    private $x = 1;
    protected $y = 2;
    public $z = 3;
    // ...
}

Inside the code of MyClass class, all instance properties ($x, $y and $z) are visibile. The sum() function sees them and when it uses them there is no need to call __get().

This also happens if the code tries to access the protected or private properties of another object of the same class. For example:

class MyClass {
    private $x = 1;
    protected $y = 2;
    public $z = 3;

    public function copyFrom(MyClass $that) {
        $this->x = $that->x;
        $this->y = $that->y;
        $this->z = $that->z;
    }
}

$a = new MyClass();
$b = new MyClass();
$b->copyFrom($a);

The copyFrom() method has access to all properties of the $that object (because it is of the same class as $this) and __get() is not invoked.

But for this code:

$a = new MyClass();
echo($a->x + $a->y + $a->z);

the magic method __get() is invoked twice, for $a->x and $a->y because these properties are not visible from the code outside the MyClass class.


As a general rule, if the class does not define the __get() method, when a property that is not visible is accessed for reading, the interpreter triggers the fatal error:

PHP Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Cannot access private property MyClass::$x

The presence of __get() suppresses the error. __get() is invoked instead and the value it returns is used. If __get() does not return a value (no matter why), NULL is used instead (this is the standard PHP behaviour of functions).

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