I want to learn how to create an abstract syntax tree for nested tuples using a Perl regexp with embedded code execution. I can easily program that using a Perl 6 grammar and I'm aware that using parsing modules would simplify the task in Perl 5, but I think for such simple tasks I should be able to do it without modules by learning how to mechanically translate from grammar definitions. I couldn't find a way to dereference $^R, so I try to undo the involuntary nesting at the end of the TUPLE rule definition, but the output is incorrect, e.g. some substrings appear twice.

use v5.10;
use Data::Dumper;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    /(?&TUPLE)(?{$a = $^R})
    (?(DEFINE)
        (?<TUPLE>
            T \s (?&ELEM) \s (?&ELEM)
            (?{ [$^R->[0][0],[$^R->[0][1],$^R[1]]] })
        )
        (?<ELEM>
            (?: (a) (?{ [$^R,$^N] }) | \( (?&TUPLE) \) )
        )
    )/x;
    say Dumper $a;
}

__DATA__
T a a
T (T a a) a
T a (T a a)
T (T a a) (T a a)
T (T (T a a) a) (T a (T a a))

Expected output data structure is a nested list:

['a','a'];
['a',['a','a']];
[['a','a'],'a'];
[['a','a'],['a','a']];
[[['a','a'],'a'],['a',['a','a']]]

For reference I'll also share my working Perl 6 code:

grammar Tuple {
  token TOP { 'T ' <elem> ' ' <elem> }
  token elem { 'a' | '(' <TOP> ')'}
}
class Actions {
  method TOP($/) {make ($<elem>[0].made, $<elem>[1].made)}
  method elem($/) {make $<TOP> ?? $<TOP>.made !! 'a'}
}
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Trying to figure out how to use (?{ ... }) constructs is almost always not worth the effort. In particular, this can have unexpected behaviour together with backtracking. It is also very difficult to debug such regexes since the control flow tends to be non-obvious.

Instead, it tends to be easier to do write an ad-hoc recursive descent parser with m//gc-style lexing: Each Perl string stores its last match offset. When applying a regex with m/\G ... /gc in scalar context, it can anchor at the last offset and advances the offset iff the match succeeds.

Here:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Test::More;

sub parse {
  my ($str) = @_;
  pos($str) = 0;  # set match position to beginning
  return parse_tuple(\$str);
}

sub parse_tuple {
  my ($ref) = @_;
  $$ref =~ /\G T \s/gcx or die error($ref, "expected tuple start T");
  my $car = parse_element($ref);
  $$ref =~ /\G \s /gcx or die error($ref, "expected space between tuple elements");
  my $cdr = parse_element($ref);
  return [$car, $cdr];
}

sub parse_element {
  my ($ref) = @_;
  return 'a' if $$ref =~ /\G a /gcx;

  $$ref =~ /\G \( /gcx or die error($ref, "expected opening paren for nested tuple");
  my $tuple = parse_tuple($ref);
  $$ref =~ /\G \) /gcx or die error($ref, "expected closing paren after nested tuple");
  return $tuple;
}

sub error {
  my ($ref, $msg) = @_;
  my $snippet = substr $$ref, pos($$ref), 20;
  return "$msg just before '$snippet...'";
}

is_deeply parse('T a a'), ['a','a'];
is_deeply parse('T (T a a) a'), [['a','a'],'a'];
is_deeply parse('T a (T a a)'), ['a',['a','a']];
is_deeply parse('T (T a a) (T a a)'), [['a','a'],['a','a']];
is_deeply parse('T (T (T a a) a) (T a (T a a))'), [[['a','a'],'a'],['a',['a','a']]];
done_testing;
  • Cool, writing it like this makes it easier. Why do you pass the string parameter as a reference in parse_tuple? – rubystallion Nov 5 '17 at 11:34
  • 2
    @rubystallion Because the current pos where the \G anchors is part of the string value, we must not make a copy (or we'd have to assign pos again in each sub). Note that parse_element() can continue the match where parse_tuple() ended because the $$ref has the correct pos. Copies also get inefficient for larger documents. – amon Nov 5 '17 at 11:37
  • 1
    I think this is one of those places where it would make sense to use $_ instead of a parameter. – ikegami Nov 5 '17 at 16:23
  • 1
    I thought there was a subtle difference between pos $foo = 0 and pos $foo = undef, but I'm coming up with whatever it is; maybe I'm just misremembering – ysth Nov 5 '17 at 18:59
  • 1
    @ysth According to perldoc -f pos, an undef pos indicates match failure (avoided here due to /gc regex flags) or that so far no regex was executed on the string. I set pos to zero in order to make this important step more explicit, in order to reset the pos if parse() takes a ref rather than making a copy, and more importantly: so that error() can run without warnings even when the first match fails and pos would otherwise still be undef. – amon Nov 5 '17 at 19:22

I fixed the code in my question. Turns out I accidentally wrote $^R[1] instead of $^R->[1]. So now I understand why amon said that these constructs are hard to debug ;-)

use v5.10;
use Data::Dumper;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    /(?&TUPLE)(?{$a = $^R->[1]})
    (?(DEFINE)
        (?<TUPLE>
            T \s (?&ELEM) \s (?&ELEM)
            (?{ [$^R->[0][0],[$^R->[0][1],$^R->[1]]] })
        )
        (?<ELEM>
            (?: (a) (?{ [$^R,$^N] }) | \( (?&TUPLE) \) )
        )
    )/x;
    say Dumper $a;
}

__DATA__
T a a
T (T a a) a
T a (T a a)
T (T a a) (T a a)
T (T (T a a) a) (T a (T a a))

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