The following code throws me the error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 25, in <module>
    sol = anna.main()
  File "", line 17, in main
    sol = list(map(self.eat, self.mice))
  File "", line 12, in eat
    calc = np.sqrt((food ** 5))
AttributeError: 'int' object has no attribute 'sqrt'

Code:

import numpy as np
#import time

class anaconda():

    def __init__(self):
        self.mice = range(10000)

    def eat(self, food):
        calc = np.sqrt((food ** 5))
        return calc

    def main(self):

        sol = list(map(self.eat, self.mice))
        return sol


if __name__ == '__main__':
    #start = time.time()
    anna = anaconda()
    sol = anna.main()
    print(len(sol))
    #print(time.time() - start)

I believe I made a serious mistake, because it seems like Python interprets the 'np' from NumPy as an integer, but I have no glimpse why that is.

  • In a Python shell, what is the result of import numpy as np, np and type(np)? – linusg Nov 5 '17 at 15:06
  • You get :>>> np <module 'numpy' from '/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/numpy/__init__.py'> >>> type(np) <class 'module'> >>> – Ma Tze Nov 5 '17 at 15:07
  • Restart your kernel. – coldspeed Nov 5 '17 at 15:08
  • I got the same error. When I modify self.mice = range(10000) to self.mice = range(1000) then the error disappears. – Flabetvibes Nov 5 '17 at 15:14
  • 2
    Not an answer, but using lists and map and range objects and other non-NumPy data structures and control flow with NumPy is usually a bad idea; among other problems, it'll usually be vastly slower than a solution based on NumPy whole-array operations, as well as taking more memory and not handling variable-dimensionality inputs well. – user2357112 Nov 5 '17 at 19:18
up vote 12 down vote accepted

I'll try to add a precise answer to those that have already been given. numpy.sqrt has some limitations that math.sqrt doesn't have.

import math
import numpy  # version 1.13.3

print(math.sqrt(2 ** 64 - 1))
print(numpy.sqrt(2 ** 64 - 1))

print(math.sqrt(2 ** 64))
print(numpy.sqrt(2 ** 64))

returns (with Python 3.5) :

4294967296.0
4294967296.0
4294967296.0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "main.py", line 8, in <module>
    print(numpy.sqrt(2 ** 64))
AttributeError: 'int' object has no attribute 'sqrt'

In fact, 2 ** 64 is equal to 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 and, according to the standard of C data types (version C99), the long long unsigned integer type contains at least the range between 0 and 18,446,744,073,709,551,615 included.

The AttributeError occurs because numpy, seeing a type that it doesn't know how to handle (after conversion to C data type), defaults to calling the sqrt method on the object (but that doesn't exist). If we use floats instead of integers then everything will work using numpy:

import numpy  # version 1.13.3

print(numpy.sqrt(float(2 ** 64)))

returns:

4294967296.0

So instead of replacing numpy.sqrt by math.sqrt, you can alternatively replace calc = np.sqrt(food ** 5) by calc = np.sqrt(float(food ** 5)) in your code.

I hope this error will make more sense to you now.

  • absolutely! Thank you very much for the explanation. I absolutely didn't took into concern that it might be related to the integer data type returned by range(). Basically your's is the best answer. – Ma Tze Nov 5 '17 at 18:20
  • You're welcome. I agree, the link between this AttributeError and the integer data type isn't obvious. – Flabetvibes Nov 5 '17 at 18:43

As others have noticed, this boils down to the fact that np.sqrt(7131 ** 5) works but np.sqrt(7132 ** 5) returns an error:

import numpy as np

print(np.sqrt(7131 ** 5))
print(np.sqrt(7132 ** 5))

# 4294138928.9
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "main.py", line 4, in <module>
    print(np.sqrt(7132 ** 5))
AttributeError: 'int' object has no attribute 'sqrt'

Since np.sqrt docs don't mention any bounds on the argument, I'd consider this a numpy bug.

  • True so far, but notably from my terminal I can: >>> print(np.square(80000**5)) 10737418240000000000000000000000000000000000000000 – Ma Tze Nov 5 '17 at 15:29
  • @Ma Tze np.square is different from np.sqrt. – Flabetvibes Nov 5 '17 at 15:31
  • oh typo, sry to everyone. Its absolutely true, @DeepSpace is right – Ma Tze Nov 5 '17 at 15:33

You can replace numpy by the built in function math.sqrt like this:

import math  

class anaconda():

    def __init__(self):
        self.mice = range(10000)

    def eat(self, food):
        calc = math.sqrt(food ** 5)
        return calc

    def main(self):

        sol = list(map(self.eat, self.mice))
        return sol


if __name__ == '__main__':
    anna = anaconda()
    sol = anna.main()
    print(len(sol))

I think that the problem of your code is that you are probably reaching a limit (not sure yet why it raises that confusing error) because 10000**5 is a reeeally big number. You can check this out by reducing your range(10000) to range(1000). You will notice that your code runs perfectly fine then:

import numpy as np  

class anaconda():

    def __init__(self):
        self.mice = range(1000)

    def eat(self, food):
        calc = np.sqrt((food ** 5))
        return calc

    def main(self):

        sol = list(map(self.eat, self.mice))
        print sol
        return sol


if __name__ == '__main__':
    anna = anaconda()
    sol = anna.main()
    print(len(sol))

This runs perfectly fine, just by reducing range(10000) to range(1000)

  • True, useful option. But the error doesn't make sense, still? – Ma Tze Nov 5 '17 at 15:19
  • Exactly... I have no clue why that error gets raised. The error should say something related to sqrt being applied on a number bigger than what it can deal with. – caspillaga Nov 5 '17 at 15:26
  • Please notice what I just edited in my answer. If you reduce range(10000) to range(1000) your code runs perfectly fine – caspillaga Nov 5 '17 at 15:27
  • I see, thanks much! – Ma Tze Nov 5 '17 at 15:31

Plain Python

Actually, you need neither numpy nor math because sqrt(x) is x**0.5. So:

sqrt(x**5) = x ** (5/2) = x ** 2.5

It means you could replace your code with:

class anaconda():
    def __init__(self):
        self.mice = range(10000)

    def eat(self, food):
        calc = food ** 2.5
        return calc

    def main(self):
        sol = list(map(self.eat, self.mice))
        return sol


if __name__ == '__main__':
    anna = anaconda()
    sol = anna.main()
    print(len(sol))

NumPy

If you want to use NumPy, you can enjoy the fact that you can work with arrays as if they were scalars:

import numpy as np

class anaconda():

    def __init__(self):
        self.mice = np.arange(10000)

    def eat(self, food):
        return food ** 2.5

    def main(self):
        return self.eat(self.mice)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    anna = anaconda()
    sol = anna.main()
    print(len(sol))

Short refactor

Removing all the unneeded object-oriented-with-weird-names, your code becomes:

import numpy as np
print(np.arange(10000) ** 2.5)
  • Thats another good idea, using pure python. Actually, the names are not for fun, but it"s a boiled down version of a way more complex script using multiprocessing, I used this one to find some errors when it came up with this one. – Ma Tze Nov 6 '17 at 7:08

It may not be your exact case, but if you want to take the square root of a large number AND you want to have control of the precision of the result, going either to math.sqrt() or x ** 0.5 would not be much useful because your result will end up being a float number, and for large enough inputs, this will hit the limitations of float numbers.

One possibility for the specific case of sqrt is to look into an integer-only implementation of the square root algorithm, e.g. flyingcircus.util.isqrt() (Disclaimer: I am the main author of flyingcircus).

Alternatively, for a more general solution, one may look into gmpy (or any other arbitrary precision library with Python bindings).

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