2

I'm currently updating my code by replacing all raw pointer class members with smart pointers. The scenario I'm currently working on is the following:

Having two classes Foo and Bar which know about each other (using raw pointers):

class Bar;

class Foo {
public:b
    Foo(){
        m_bar = new Bar(this);
    }
private:
    Bar* m_bar;
};

class Bar {
public:
    Bar(Foo* foo) {
        m_foo = foo;
    }
private:
    Foo* m_foo;
};

Since Foo is the creator of "m_bar" and should hold a unique instance of it which is never shared, I thought about making member "m_bar" a unique pointer, resulting in a class Foo that looks like this:

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() {
        m_bar = std::unique_ptr<Bar>(new Bar(this));
    }
private:
    std::unique_ptr<Bar> m_bar;
};

But now I'm struggling with class Bar. My idea was to make member "m_foo" a shared pointer, resulting in:

class Bar;

class Foo : public std::enable_shared_from_this<Foo> {
public:
    Foo() {
        m_bar = std::unique_ptr<Bar>(new Bar(shared_from_this()));
    }
private:
    std::unique_ptr<Bar> m_bar;
};

class Bar {
public:
    Bar(std::shared_ptr<Foo> foo) {
        m_foo = foo;
    }
private:
    std::shared_ptr<Foo> m_foo;
};

But this will throw a "bad weak pointer" exception because (as far as I found out) you can only share the "this"-pointer (shared_from_this()) after the object has been created.

Problem: I want "this" to be shared during object creation because it's necessary for the program to run correctly and it could be forgotten if you do it via function call after the object creation.

Thanks for any help.

  • 2
    question about the design... you'd normally want to use shared/unique_ptr to indicate ownership, does a Foo "own" a Bar? or the other way around? Normally there is a hierarchy of sorts and a regular pointer would suffice (unless its a graph-like problem). – kmdreko Nov 5 '17 at 22:37
  • @vu1p3n0x yes a Foo "owns" a Bar and is the only owner that has access to that Bar. If Foo is destroyed, Bar will be too. – Tom B. Nov 5 '17 at 22:44
  • Do you expect to be able to make an owning smart ptr to smth not yet constructed? – curiousguy Nov 7 '17 at 2:55
4

I would recommend only using shared_ptr when you actually want shared ownership semantics, and only using unique_ptr when you want unique ownership semantics. Otherwise you will confuse not only yourself, but others reading your code.

Your text description indicates that Foo uniquely owns each Bar, so Foo should have a unique_ptr<Bar>.

However, a Bar does not own a Foo in any sense, so Bar should neither have a unique_ptr<Foo> nor a shared_ptr<Foo>.


You could retain Bar having a Foo *. There's no need to overcomplicate things; if you are adopting a convention in your code that pointers with ownership semantics use smart pointer classes, then it follows that raw pointers have no ownership semantics.

There is a proposal observer_ptr<Foo> which is just a wrapper for raw pointer but supposed to self-document that it really doesn't have ownership semantics.

Another thing to be consider would be for Bar to have a Foo&. This decision will depend on whether you want to be able to move a Foo whilst retaining the original instance of Bar (i.e. not also moving the Bar). The reference version will not support that operation, but the pointer version would work with Foo's move-constructor modifying its Bar's back-pointer. Meaning Bar will need to be a friend of Foo since the back-pointer is private.

  • Thank you, your answer makes sense to me. – Tom B. Nov 5 '17 at 22:49
1

Another option is that you use std::shared_ptr in Foo, to hold a Bar reference, and then a std::weak_ptr to hold references to Foo from Bar.

Edit: I believe what I recommend is the one closest to the spirit of how the std smart pointers are meant to be used. You should use unique_ptr / shared_ptr to delineate (and enforce) ownership, and weak_ptr when you want to hold a reference to an object in a class that does not own it. This way you can avoid using naked pointers entirely.

Using weak_ptr requires that you also use shared_ptr, since weak_ptr's cannot be created from unique_ptr's, but even if only ever one class holds a shared_ptr to the object in question, that is still in the spirit of how they are intended to be used.

Regarding M.M.'s point on ownership semantics, either shared or unique ptr signify ownership, while weak_ptr signifies a reference, so this is still fine.

Another two tips towards this architecture:

A: You could create your classes in a Factory, having their relations defined through setters, rather than each class handling the creation of its children (Dependency Injection). Ideally you could follow Alexandrescu's tips on the Factory design.

Alternatively B: You could use the named constructor idiom, with public static create(...) methods doing the actual constructing, to circumvent the error that occurs due to the class being incomplete during construction.

But I'd rather recommend alternative A here.

  • While the tips A and B don't directly answer the question, I think each of them could lead to a big improvement. – TobiMcNamobi Nov 6 '17 at 12:46
  • 1
    weak_ptr can only be used to refer to something else that is managed by shared_ptr, and furthermore, the purpose of it is to be able to point to something that might be deleted out from under it. IMO this is not a match for OP's scenario in which the Foo will never be destroyed before the Bar, and the Foo might not be managed by shared_ptr anyway. – M.M Nov 6 '17 at 23:11
  • Also, the only use of weak_ptr, or any weak ref, is to try to make a shared_ptr, or any real (strong) ref out of it. – curiousguy Nov 7 '17 at 3:00
  • @M.M, my point exactly, and in that case I see no harm in using shared_ptr, as per my original edit. I agree that in the specific example Foo is never destroyed before Bar. I (correctly or incorrectly) extrapolated to the case where a bigger data structure is built this way, where it is not guaranteed that Bar is never accessed during or after Foo is deleted. But yes, in the specific example, where Bar never escapes its containing class Bar, weak_ptr is not necessary. – onar3d Nov 7 '17 at 8:15
0

The problem you facing caused by relations with object Foo and Bar.

You will have recursive destructor call.

Imagine, that you have a code: C++17

std::unique_ptr<Foo> r = std::make_unique<Foo>();
r.reset();

What gonna happen? You will enter Foo destructor and will later enter Bar destructor. Bar destructor will next enter destructor of Foo etc.

I think that you have to rethink your relations of classes first.

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