I'm trying to make a singleton in Kotlin and am running into problems because I get a smart cast to PresenterManager is impossible because instance is mutable property that could have been changed at this time.

This seems like a pretty standard way to make a singleton. Why won't it let me and how can I fix it?

PresenterManager {
    //some code
    ....

    companion object {
        private val PRESENTER_ID = "presenter_id"
        private var instance: PresenterManager? = null

        fun getManager(): PresenterManager {
            if (instance == null) {
                instance = PresenterManager(10, 30, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
            }
            return instance
        }
    }
}

This seems like a pretty standard way to make a singleton.

I do recommend you to read a bit more about Kotlin.

object PresenterManager {
    init {
       // init code
    }

    fun whatever() {}
}

What I wrote above is a Singleton in Kotlin. Now, to explain the message you are getting:

smart cast to PresenterManager is impossible because instance is mutable property that could have been changed at this time

instance is nullable (private var instance: PresenterManager? = null), and the getManager function expects a non-null return type, so one of the many ways of solving this is by either make getManager return a nullable type (fun getManager(): PresenterManager?) or make use of the !! operator on your return type.

The main point is that you really don't need of that instance variable at all if you use an object instead of a class to declare your singleton.

  • Or instance could be made non-null and lateinit – ianhanniballake Nov 6 '17 at 2:47
  • It can also be lazy-instantiated using by lazy { PresenterManager() }. My point answering this question isn't about the options available for making instance non-null but to rather explain there's no need for it in first place and explain the reason behind the lint error :) – mradzinski Nov 6 '17 at 3:21

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.