I just got a question that I can't answer.

Suppose you have this loop definition in Java:

while (i == i) ;

What is the type of i and the value of i if the loop is not an infinite loop and the program is using only one thread?

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    oh for god's sake, would people have the honor to comment as to why they downvote? this is tagged as a riddle, what's the problem??? – user54579 Jan 22 '09 at 23:42
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    I think some people cannot stop downvoting for anything. – FerranB Jan 22 '09 at 23:48
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    Bah, sorry for causing this :/ I really just wanted the answer, and I couldn't solve it for myself. – Zizzencs Jan 22 '09 at 23:49
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    @nickolai, that's the nature of SO - drive-by downvoting is unfortunately a reality and the idea of requiring a comment have been discussed and rejected. But it looks like the "community" is in favor of this question after all. – paxdiablo Jan 23 '09 at 3:41
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    One of the tricks of this sort of question is that people assume the type of certain variable names i.e. i is an int, d is a double, s is a string or a short, ch is a char, l is a long, b for byte or boolean. You have to ask yourself what type is suggested and what could it be. – Peter Lawrey Jul 19 '09 at 6:36

12 Answers 12

up vote 126 down vote accepted
double i = Double.NaN;

The API for Double.equals() spells out the answer: "Double.NaN==Double.NaN has the value false". This is elaborated in the Java Language Specification under "Floating-Point Types, Formats, and Values":

NaN is unordered, so the numerical comparison operators <, <=, >, and >= return false if either or both operands are NaN. The equality operator == returns false if either operand is NaN, and the inequality operator != returns true if either operand is NaN. In particular, x!=x is true if and only if x is NaN, and (x<y) == !(x>=y) will be false if x or y is NaN.

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    OH so you CAN do "Not a Number"! – Filip Ekberg Jan 22 '09 at 23:42
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    its mathematically solid, why should one unreal number equal another? 5/0 != sqrt(-4) – Gordon Gustafson Sep 9 '09 at 1:11
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    @CrazyJugglerDrummer: Maybe, but likewise x == x should always be true. Why should anything not equal itself? – Bart van Heukelom Jul 28 '11 at 8:21
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    Bart: because really, unknown is not always equal to unknown. Sometimes it is useful, that's why databases have NULL... – Konerak Jan 4 '12 at 8:01
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    @inovaovao: no, in a DB, null=null is null. NULL IS NULL is 1. – Konerak Feb 28 '12 at 18:43

The value of i is then Invalid. "Not a Number".

After some googling, i found out that you CAN have NaN ( Not a Number ) in Java! So, a Float Pointing number is the Data Type and the Value is NaN. See here

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    Yep, That's it. The value of i is Jon Skeet. – Andrew Rollings Jan 22 '09 at 23:39
  • Yes, double i = Double.NaN – Jaime Soriano Jan 22 '09 at 23:47
  • I generally hate people who downvote for no reason... I was the first to say "Not a Number" but didnt think java could handle that, since it doesnt handle anything else cool. – Filip Ekberg Jan 22 '09 at 23:47
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    +1 for being first to say "Not a Number" =) – Zach Scrivena Jan 22 '09 at 23:49
double i = Double.NaN;

NaN is not equal to anything, including itself.

float i = Float.NaN;
while(i == i) ;
System.out.println("Not infinite!");

I'm not sure, but I believe (i == i) is not atomic operation in multithreaded process, so if i value will be changed by other thread between pushes of it's value to stack on thread executing the loop, then that condition can be false.

Since others said it's NaN I got curious about the official (JDK 6) implementation of Double.isNaN, and behold:

/**
 * Returns <code>true</code> if the specified number is a
 * Not-a-Number (NaN) value, <code>false</code> otherwise.
 *
 * @param   v   the value to be tested.
 * @return  <code>true</code> if the value of the argument is NaN;
 *          <code>false</code> otherwise.
 */
static public boolean isNaN(double v) {
    return (v != v);
}

Think of Nan as the equivalent of exception but uses a magic value within a calculation. Because a calculation failed - eg square root of a negative, divide by zero etc - it makes no sense in comparing them against anything else. After all if divide by zero is a nan is it equivalent to the square root of -2 or square root of -3 ?

Nan allows a calculation that includes a step that returns an invalid answer to complete without introducing extra exceptions. To verify the answer is value simply test for non nandness ( is that's word if not I bags it) via Float.isNan() o equivalent.

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    It would be easier to think of it as exceptiolbut if I actually knew what an exceptiolbut was :-). – paxdiablo Jan 23 '09 at 0:33

I would add

float i = Float.NaN;

as well as

double i = Double.NaN;

A common trick in these sort of questions it in the assumption you make that i is an int. Other common assumptions might be s is a String, x,y are a double, ch is a char, b is a byte etc. If you see a question like this you can bet that 'i' is not its expect type.

A similar question is; This never loops, what is 'x'

while(x == x && x != x + 0) { }

Another question I quite like is; This loop is an infinite loop, what are the possible values of x. (: I count twelve of them :)

while(x != 0 && x == -x) { }

I know this is a Java question, but considering the question for other languages is intriguing.

In C, a simple type such as 'int' could exhibit 'terminate before the universe grows cold' behaviour if 'i' was declared as a volatile (so the compiler would be forced to do two reads of 'i' for each iteration) and if 'i' was actually in memory where something else could affect it. Then the loop would terminate when 'i' changed between the two reads of a single iteration. (Added: a possible place - in a micro-computer where 'i' is actually located at the address of an I/O port, perhaps connected to a position sensor. It would be more plausible if 'i' was a pointer variable (a pointer to volatile memory) and the statement was 'while (*i == *i);'.)

As evidenced by other answers, in C++, the '==' operator can be supplied by the user if i is of a user-defined class, so anything might be possible.

Rather like NaN, in an SQL-based language, the loop would not be infinite if the value of i was NULL; however, any non-NULL value would make the loop infinite. This is rather like Java, where any number (as opposed to NaN) makes the loop infinite.

I do not see the construct having any practical use, but it is an interesting trivia question.

I was surprised to not see this solution:

while (sin(x) == sin(x)) //probably won't eval to true

In response to a comment, try running this:

double x = 10.5f;
assert (x == asin(sin(x)));

x should always equal the arcsine(sin(x)) in theory, but in practice it doesn't.

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    Why not? You are doing exactly the same calculation on exactly the same data, both results will contain exactly the same error. – Loren Pechtel Jul 19 '09 at 1:53
  • I can't remember exactly where I read it, but depending on your machine/implementation, the sin(x) on one function call has a miniscule chance of equaling sin(x) of a different call. It has to do with the accuracy of floating point digits (something is special about the trig functions that makes them not return the same value twice). – jkeys Jul 19 '09 at 2:13
  • See my update. Arcsine "undoes" the sin of x, so they should be equal, but they are not. – jkeys Jul 19 '09 at 2:22
  • That's not the same thing. Like Loren said, you're performing the exact same operation on x, which should yield the exact same result with the exact same inaccuracy. Arcsin can't reverse the result of a sin with floating point numbers because the value passed to asin() is not going to be exactly accurate. Therefore, the result of asin() will be inaccurate, making x == asin(sin(x)) false. Also, arcsin doesn't necessarily "undo" a sin operation—the sin function can give the same result for multiple values of x, which is why asin() only returns numbers between -π/2 and π/2. – hbw Jul 19 '09 at 2:56
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    In other words, arcsin can't always "undo" the sin function because it's impossible for arcsin to know what the original angle was. For example, the sin of both π/2 and 5π/2 give 1. But what's arcsin(1)? It obviously can't give both back, right? Therefore, the result of arcsin must be restricted to a range of 2π radians, meaning that it can't actually undo the result of the sin function unless the original angle is between 0 and 2π, or in C's case, -π/2 and π/2. (Indeed, arcsin(sin(5π/2)) = π/2.) Anyways, that was a really long explanation, but I hope that helps clear up any misconceptions. – hbw Jul 19 '09 at 8:16

Not infinite loop, one thread :)

import static B.*;
public class A {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Still Running");
        while (i == i) ;
    }
}


public class B {

    public static int i;
    static {
        System.exit(0);
    }
}

i == i is not atomic. Proved by such program:

static volatile boolean i = true;
public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
{
    new Thread() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                i = !i;
            }
        }
    }.start();

    while (i == i) ;
    System.out.println("Not atomic! i: " + i);
}

Update Here is one more example of not-infinite loop (no new threads are created).

public class NoNewThreads {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new NoNewThreads();
        System.gc();
        int i = 500;
        System.out.println("Still Running");
        while (i == i) ;
    }

    @Override
    protected void finalize() throws Throwable {
        super.finalize();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.exit(0);
    }
}
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    Using only 1 thread... your program uses two. – Charles Goodwin Jul 27 '11 at 23:29
  • @Charles Goodwin What you say to the fact that there is no possibility to write a Java program using one thread :), so all other solutions use at least two threads (exactly the same as my second program in 'Update' section do). – Andrey Jul 28 '11 at 8:05
  • That's not braking the loop. Any code after while (i == i); wont ever execute. – aalku Nov 12 '11 at 11:48
  • Finalize uses another thread, but it's a good thing to point out. It's the reason the original question said "and the program only uses one thread".. kind of explicitly stating that this is the obvious answer and they wish for you to look further. – Bill K Sep 8 '16 at 20:46

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