How to count maximum consecutive positive numbers using closures?

var numbers = [1,3,4,-1,-2,5,2,-2,-3,-4,5]
//in this case it should be 3

print(numbers.reduce(0, { $1 > 0 ? $0 + 1 : $0 } ))//this counts total positive numbers
  • we look for the number in numbers: 1,3,4 - all positive, we count them - its 3. then 2 negative numbers, 2 positive, 3 negative and 1 positive. So, maximum consecutive positive numbers - 3. – Anton Nov 6 '17 at 12:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Update: Simpler solution: Split the array into slices of positive elements, and determine the maximal slice length:

let  numbers = [1,3,4,-1,-2,5,2,-2,-3,-4,5]
let maxConsecutive = numbers.split(whereSeparator: { $0 <= 0 }).map { $0.count }.max()!
print(maxConsecutive) // 3

Old answer:) Using the ideas from Swift running sum:

let  numbers = [1,3,4,-1,-2,5,2,-2,-3,-4,5]

let maxConsecutive = numbers.map({
    () -> (Int) -> Int in var c = 0; return { c = $0 > 0 ? c + 1 : 0; return c }
}()).max()!

Here map() maps each array element to the count of consecutive positive numbers up to the elements position, in this case

[1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1]

The transformation is created as an "immediately evaluated closure" to capture a variable c which holds the current number of consecutive positive numbers. The transformation increments or resets c, and returns the updated value.

If the array is possibly large then change it to

let maxConsecutive = numbers.lazy.map( ... ).max()!

so that the maximum run length is determined without creating an intermediate array.

  • Thanks, that's exactly what I want - simple and short solution! How can I find average consecutive positive number? With map we get [1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1], now what to use, filter and reduce? The result should be [3,2,1], then sum 6 divide by count 3 = 2 – Anton Nov 6 '17 at 17:25
  • @Anton: Inspired by your new question, I have updated this answer with a much simpler solution. – Martin R Nov 7 '17 at 15:11
  • many many thanks! – Anton Nov 7 '17 at 15:24
var numbers = [1, 3, 4, -1, -2, 5, 2, -2, -3, -4, 5]

let result = numbers.reduce((current: 0, max: 0)) { result, number in
    var value = result

    if number > 0 {
        value.current += 1
        value.max = max(value.current, value.max)
    } else {
        value.current = 0
    }

    return value
}



result.max
  • Good idea, but there seem to be some problems. It returns 0 for the given array. – Martin R Nov 6 '17 at 13:21
  • 1
    @MartinR you're right! There was a problem but now it fixed. Cheers :) – Arsen Nov 6 '17 at 13:37
var currentResult = 0
var maxResult = 0
for i in numbers {
    currentResult = i > 0 ? currentResult + 1 : 0
    if maxResult < currentResult {
       maxResult = currentResult
    }
}
print(maxResult)

Solution without closures

  • Thanks, but i need solution with closures) – Anton Nov 6 '17 at 13:02
  • print(numbers.reduce(0) { $1 > 0 ? $0 + 1 : 0 }) - this gives me 6 in this example - all positive numbers. How do I get max consecutive numbers using closures (3 in this case)? – Anton Nov 6 '17 at 13:13
  • This returns 0 for the array [1,2,3,4] – Martin R Nov 6 '17 at 13:28
  • 1
    @MartinR oops) Updated the code) Thanks for checking) – Utemissov Nov 6 '17 at 13:37

Generating subsequences:

let numbers = [1,3,4,-1,-2,5,2,-2,-3,-4,5]
let subsequences: [[Int]] = numbers.reduce(into: []) { (result, number) in
    guard
        var currentSequence = result.last,
        let lastNumber = currentSequence.last
    else {
        result = [[number]]
        return
    }

    if number == lastNumber + 1 {
        currentSequence.append(number)
        result.removeLast()
        result.append(currentSequence)
    } else {
        result.append([number])
    }
}
let longest = subsequences.max { $0.count < $1.count }
print(subsequences)
print("Longest subsequence: \(longest)")
print("Longest length: \(longest?.count)")

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