5

I have a collection of struct objects. I'd like to iterate over the collection with an iterator of trait objects, but I can't create an appropriate iterator for that. My reduced test code is:

struct MyStruct {}
struct MyStorage(Vec<MyStruct>);

trait MyTrait {} // Dummy trait to demonstrate the problem
impl MyTrait for MyStruct {}

trait MyContainer {
    fn items<'a>(&'a self) -> Box<Iterator<Item = &'a MyTrait> + 'a>;
}
impl MyContainer for MyStorage {
    fn items<'a>(&'a self) -> Box<Iterator<Item = &'a MyTrait> + 'a> {
        Box::new(self.0.iter())
    }
}

This results the following compiler error:

error[E0271]: type mismatch resolving `<std::slice::Iter<'_, MyStruct> as std::iter::Iterator>::Item == &MyTrait`
  --> src/main.rs:12:9
   |
12 |         Box::new(self.0.iter())
   |         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ expected struct `MyStruct`, found trait MyTrait
   |
   = note: expected type `&MyStruct`
              found type `&MyTrait`
   = note: required for the cast to the object type `std::iter::Iterator<Item=&MyTrait>`

My understanding is that though &MyStruct is normally convertible to &MyTrait, the Iterator implementation of the standard library doesn't allow it in this case. Note that the same construct works with a Vec<Box<MyStruct>> and Iterator<Item=&Box<MyTrait>>, but boxing doesn't feel necessary here.

Is there any way to make this work with references?

  • 1
    I wasn't sure, but I tried it, and Rust sees no difference between &(MyTrait + 'a) and &'a MyTrait, so you should probably use the second one since that is the more usual syntax. – trentcl Nov 7 '17 at 13:16
7

You need to cast the single elements explicitly, like this:

Box::new(self.0.iter().map(|e| e as &MyTrait))
  • 1
    Thanks, nice answer! Does it have any runtime (cpu,mem) costs or is just an "unconventional cast" as it seems? – Zólyomi István Nov 7 '17 at 11:06
  • 6
    A trait object reference is probably two pointers big (one to the object, and one to the "vtable"), so there is some overhead compared to the simple pointer, but it shouldn't involve computations. Though if you wanted to improve performance you should remove the Box around the iterator (use an associated type in the trait). – Stefan Nov 7 '17 at 11:12

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