I know about joins in SQL Server.

For example. there is two tables Table1, Table2.

There table structure are following.

create table Table1 (id int, Name varchar (10))

create table Table2 (id int, Name varchar (10))

Table1 Data as follows:

    Id     Name     
    -------------
    1      A        
    2      B    

Table2 Data as follows:

    Id     Name     
    -------------
    1      A        
    2      B 
    3      C

If I execute both below mentioned SQL statements, both outputs will be the same

select *
from Table1
  left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

select *
from Table2
  right join Table1 on Table1.id = Table2.id

Please explain the difference between left and right join in above sql statements.

10 Answers 10

up vote 68 down vote accepted
Select * from Table1 left join Table2 ...

and

Select * from Table2 right join Table1 ...

are indeed completely interchangeable. Try however Table2 left join Table1 (or its identical pair, Table1 right join Table2) to see a difference. This query should give you more rows, since Table2 contains a row with an id which is not present in Table1.

  • 13
    So why do we need RIGHT JOIN if we can achieve any desired result with just LEFT JOIN? :P – Silap Aliyev Dec 15 '15 at 5:03
  • 1
    @SilapAliyev That's actually a very good question. Can anyone answer? :D – Ian Chu Te Jan 8 '16 at 2:46
  • 17
    Select * from Table1 left join Table 2 will return ALL the records of table 1 plus coincident records of Table 2. The opposite Select * from Table1 right join Table 2would return ALL records from Table 2 and coincident records of Table 1. Hopes it helps. – Programador Adagal Jan 12 '16 at 16:09
  • 3
    if you use more then 2 tables , using right join can be meaningful and readable – ʞɔıɥʇɹɐʞ ouɐɯ Jul 26 '16 at 13:29
  • @ProgramadorAdagal This doesn't explain why we have both, you can get same results with only one or the other: SELECT * FROM Table1 LEFT JOIN Table2 and SELECT * FROM Table2 LEFT JOIN Table1 – Markus Meskanen Jan 17 '17 at 14:26

Codeproject has this image which explains the simple basics of SQL joins, taken from: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/Visual_SQL_Joins.aspx SQL joins explained

  • 61
    There ain't much 'detail' in there. Credit should actually go to the codeproject page instead of to me. But I of course don't mind the attention :-) – Daan Timmer Jan 22 '13 at 12:41
  • 3
    @Daan Timmer no, there must be credit to you too! You repackage and resell to meet a specific and particular demand. Retailers do the same and get $$ billions – BKSpurgeon Nov 21 '15 at 1:34
  • I feel we may require "AND" condition in where clause of last figure of "Outer Excluding JOIN". I feel query needs to be updated to SELECT <select_list> FROM Table_A A FULL OUTER JOIN Table_B B ON A.Key = B.Key WHERE A.Key IS NULL AND B.Key IS NULL – vinsinraw Jun 21 '16 at 22:05
  • @vinsinraw that is not needed. Because that is already covered by the condition: JOIN Table_B b ON A.Key = B.Key. The OR condition works just fine. – Daan Timmer Jun 22 '16 at 7:00

Table from which you are taking data is 'LEFT'.
Table you are joining is 'RIGHT'.
LEFT JOIN: Take all items from left table AND (only) matching items from right table.
RIGHT JOIN: Take all items from right table AND (only) matching items from left table.
So:

Select * from Table1 left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id  

gives:

Id     Name       
-------------  
1      A          
2      B      

but:

Select * from Table1 right join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

gives:

Id     Name       
-------------  
1      A          
2      B   
3      C  

you were right joining table with less rows on table with more rows
AND
again, left joining table with less rows on table with more rows
Try:

 If Table1.Rows.Count > Table2.Rows.Count Then  
    ' Left Join  
 Else  
    ' Right Join  
 End If  
select fields 
from tableA --left
left join tableB --right
on tableA.key = tableB.key

The table in the from in this example tableA, is on the left side of relation.

tableA <- tableB
[left]------[right]

So if you want to take all rows from the left table (tableA), even if there are no matches in the right table (tableB), you'll use the "left join".

And if you want to take all rows from the right table (tableB), even if there are no matches in the left table (tableA), you will use the right join.

Thus, the following query is equivalent to that used above.

select fields
from tableB 
right join tableA on tableB.key = tableA.key

You seem to be asking, "If I can rewrite a RIGHT OUTER JOIN using LEFT OUTER JOIN syntax then why have a RIGHT OUTER JOIN syntax at all?" I think the answer to this question is, because the designers of the language didn't want to place such a restriction on users (and I think they would have been criticized if they did), which would force users to change the order of tables in the FROM clause in some circumstances when merely changing the join type.

  • sometimes left and right outer joins are completely interchangeable, correct? – アレックス Dec 25 '13 at 9:00
  • 3
    @Alex: indeed left and right outer joins are always interchangeable. – onedaywhen Jan 6 '14 at 10:21

Your two statements are equivalent.

Most people only use LEFT JOIN since it seems more intuitive, and it's universal syntax - I don't think all RDBMS support RIGHT JOIN.

  • "I don't think all RDBMS support RIGHT JOIN" -- sure, not all RDBMSs support SQL. But if you are implying that some SQL products support LEFT but not RIGHT then please indicate which ones. – onedaywhen Jan 18 '11 at 10:56
  • 9
    @onedaywhen For example, SQLite 3 doesn't implement RIGHT and FULL OUTER JOIN : sqlite.org/omitted.html – Mac_Cain13 Dec 13 '12 at 10:19

(INNER) JOIN: Returns records that have matching values in both tables.

LEFT (OUTER) JOIN: Return all records from the left table, and the matched records from the right table.

RIGHT (OUTER) JOIN: Return all records from the right table, and the matched records from the left table.

FULL (OUTER) JOIN: Return all records when there is a match in either left or right table

For example, lets suppose we have two table with following records:

Table A

id   firstname   lastname
___________________________
1     Ram         Thapa
2     sam         Koirala
3     abc         xyz
6    sruthy       abc

Table B

id2   place
_____________
1      Nepal
2      USA
3      Lumbini
5      Kathmandu

Inner Join

Note: It give the intersection of two table.

Inner Join

Syntax

SELECT column_name FROM table1 INNER JOIN table2 ON table1.column_name = table2.column_name;

Apply it in your sample table:

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.Place FROM TableA INNER JOIN TableB ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result will be:

firstName       lastName       Place
_____________________________________
  Ram         Thapa             Nepal
  sam         Koirala            USA
  abc         xyz              Lumbini

Left Join

Note : will give all selected rows in TableA, plus any common selected rows in TableB.

Left join

SELECT column_name(s) FROM table1 LEFT JOIN table2 ON table1.column_name = table2.column_name;

Apply it in your sample table

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.Place FROM TableA LEFT JOIN TableB ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result will be:

firstName   lastName    Place
______________________________
 Ram         Thapa      Nepal
 sam         Koirala    USA
 abc         xyz        Lumbini
sruthy       abc        Null

Right Join

Note:will give all selected rows in TableB, plus any common selected rows in TableA.

Right Join

Syntax:

SELECT column_name(s) FROM table1 RIGHT JOIN table2 ON table1.column_name = table2.column_name;

Apply it in your samole table:

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.Place FROM TableA RIGHT JOIN TableB ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result will bw:

firstName   lastName     Place
______________________________
Ram         Thapa         Nepal
sam         Koirala       USA
abc         xyz           Lumbini
Null        Null          Kathmandu

Full Join

Note : It is same as union operation, it will return all selected values from both tables.

Full join

Syntax:

SELECT column_name(s) FROM table1 FULL OUTER JOIN table2 ON table1.column_name = table2.column_name;

Apply it in your samp[le table:

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.Place FROM TableA FULL JOIN TableB ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result will be:

firstName   lastName    Place
______________________________
 Ram         Thapa      Nepal
 sam         Koirala    USA
 abc         xyz        Lumbini
sruthy       abc        Null
 Null         Null      Kathmandu

Some facts

For INNER joins the order doesn't matter

For (LEFT, RIGHT or FULL) OUTER joins,the order matter

Find More at w3schools

I feel we may require AND condition in where clause of last figure of Outer Excluding JOIN so that we get the desired result of A Union B Minus A Interaction B. I feel query needs to be updated to

SELECT <select_list>
FROM Table_A A
FULL OUTER JOIN Table_B B
ON A.Key = B.Key
WHERE A.Key IS NULL AND B.Key IS NULL

If we use OR , then we will get all the results of A Union B

select * from Table1 left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

In the first query Left join compares left-sided table table1 to right-sided table table2.

In Which all the properties of table1 will be shown, whereas in table2 only those properties will be shown in which condition get true.

select * from Table2 right join Table1 on Table1.id = Table2.id

In the first query Right join compares right-sided table table1 to left-sided table table2.

In Which all the properties of table1 will be shown, whereas in table2 only those properties will be shown in which condition get true.

Both queries will give the same result because the order of table declaration in query are different like you are declaring table1 and table2 in left and right respectively in first left join query, and also declaring table1 and table2 in right and left respectively in second right join query.

This is the reason why you are getting the same result in both queries. So if you want different result then execute this two queries respectively,

select * from Table1 left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

select * from Table1 right join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

Select * from Table1 t1 Left Join Table2 t2 on t1.id=t2.id By definition: Left Join selects all columns mentioned with the "select" keyword from Table 1 and the columns from Table 2 which matches the criteria after the "on" keyword.

Similarly,By definition: Right Join selects all columns mentioned with the "select" keyword from Table 2 and the columns from Table 1 which matches the criteria after the "on" keyword.

Referring to your question, id's in both the tables are compared with all the columns needed to be thrown in the output. So, ids 1 and 2 are common in the both the tables and as a result in the result you will have four columns with id and name columns from first and second tables in order.

*select * from Table1 left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

The above expression,it takes all the records (rows) from table 1 and columns, with matching id's from table 1 and table 2, from table 2.

select * from Table2 right join Table1 on Table1.id = Table2.id**

Similarly from the above expression,it takes all the records (rows) from table 1 and columns, with matching id's from table 1 and table 2, from table 2. (remember, this is a right join so all the columns from table2 and not from table1 will be considered).

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