I am trying to remove overlapping regions from a 9 column gff3 file.

**Input file:**
scaffold591 Source gene 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcript 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007.t1;Parent=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3322458 3322458 . - . Parent=g24007.t1
scaffold591 Source gene 3322500 3346055 0.41 - . ID=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcript 3322500 3346055 0.41 - . ID=g24007.t1;Parent=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3322500 3322500 . - . Parent=g24007.t1
scaffold591 Source gene 3377307 3513095 0.46 + . ID=g24008
scaffold591 Source transcript 3377307 3513095 0.41 + . ID=g24008.t1;Parent=g24008
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3377307 3377307 . + . Parent=g24008.t1

Here I am trying to compare only the rows having "gene" of the same strand i.e "-" or "+" (7th column).

For example row 1 and row 4.

scaffold591 Source gene 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007
scaffold591 Source gene 3322500 3346055 0.41 - . ID=g24007

They are "gene" from the same scaffold and same "-" strand (7th column). The row4 coordinates (column 4 and 5) lies within the range of row 1 coordinates. In such cases, my code should remove the overlapping row 4 and retain the row1 having the larger range.

**My expected output:**
scaffold591 Source gene 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcript 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007.t1;Parent=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3322458 3322458 . - . Parent=g24007.t1
scaffold591 Source gene 3377307 3513095 0.46 + . ID=g24008
scaffold591 Source transcript 3377307 3513095 0.41 + . ID=g24007.t1;Parent=g24008
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3377307 3377307 . + . Parent=g24008.t1

My code prints row1 and its following lines twice

My code:
#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use List::Util qw{ max };

open (IN, "<scaffold_sample.txt");

my $previous_seqid ="";
my $previous_strand;
my $previous_start;
my $previous_end;
my @gff;
my @tmp;
while (<IN>)
 {
    chomp;
    my ($seqid,$source, $region, $start, $end, $score, $strand, $frame, $attribute) = split ("\t",$_);  
    @gff = ($seqid,$source, $region, $start, $end, $score, $strand, $frame, $attribute);

    if ($seqid eq $previous_seqid && $strand eq $previous_strand && $region eq 'gene')
    {
        if($start < $previous_end && $end < $previous_end)
        {
            @gff = @tmp;
            $previous_seqid = $gff[0];
            $previous_strand = $gff[6];
            $previous_start = $gff[3];
            $previous_end = $gff[4];
            print join "\t",@gff;
            print "\n";
        }
        else
        {
            @tmp = @gff;
        }

    }
    else
    {
        @tmp = ($seqid,$source, $region, $start, $end, $score, $strand, $frame, $attribute);
        $previous_seqid = $seqid;
        $previous_strand = $strand;
        $previous_start = $start;
        $previous_end = $end;
        print join "\t",@tmp;
        print "\n";
    }

}

Please help.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This turns out to be an interesting problem. You want to de-dup the rows, but (I think) that if you find a larger range later in the file, you want to output this large range in the position where the original, smaller, range was found.

To be honest, I didn't look at your solution but started from scratch.

I used two data structures. %line_data contains details of the lines we have processed. It is a multi-level hash and is keyed on seqid, strand and region. If a new record doesn't match a value in the hash then we are a combination of seqid, strand and region for the first time. If a new record does match, then we've seen this combination before and we work out which of the two has the largest range and overwrite if necessary.

Then there's @lines which contains the data we are going to output. It contains references to the hashes in %line_data. There's a bit of house-keeping needed to keep that up to date when larger ranges are found.

So this is what I ended up with. It gives the correct output for your input, but I don't know if it will break on more varied input.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

my @lines;
my %line_data;

# Column names (for use as hash keys)    
my @cols = qw[seqid source region start end score strand frame attribute];

# Store the input data in DATA for easier testing
while (<DATA>) {
  my %record;
  # Split a record into a hash
  @record{@cols} = split;

  # If this key combination exists...
  if (exists $line_data{$record{seqid}}{$record{strand}}{$record{region}}) {
    # Get the previous record with these keys...
    my $prev = $line_data{$record{seqid}}{$record{strand}}{$record{region}};
    # See if the new range is larger...
    if ($record{start} > $prev->{start} and $record{end} > $prev->{end}) {
      # If so, overwrite it.
      $line_data{$record{seqid}}{$record{strand}}{$record{region}} = \%record;
      $lines[$prev->{pos}] = \%record;
      $record{post} = $prev->{pos};
    }
  } else {
    # We haven't seen this key combination before.
    # So just store it.
    $line_data{$record{seqid}}{$record{strand}}{$record{region}} = \%record;
    push @lines, \%record;
    $record{pos} = $#lines;
  }
}

# Having processed the data, we walk the @lines array,
# de-referencing the hash and joining the values with a space.
foreach (@lines) {
  say join ' ', @$_{@cols};
}

__DATA__
scaffold591 Source gene 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcript 3322458 3376057 0.41 - . ID=g24007.t1;Parent=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3322458 3322458 . - . Parent=g24007.t1
scaffold591 Source gene 3322500 3346055 0.41 - . ID=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcript 3322500 3346055 0.41 - . ID=g24007.t1;Parent=g24007
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3322500 3322500 . - . Parent=g24007.t1
scaffold591 Source gene 3377307 3513095 0.46 + . ID=g24008
scaffold591 Source transcript 3377307 3513095 0.41 + . ID=g24008.t1;Parent=g24008
scaffold591 Source transcription_end_site 3377307 3377307 . + . Parent=g24008.t1
  • I did arrive at a solution similar to your approach but my solution works partially. It prints only lines with the word "gene". Your solution works well. Thanks. – Jesvin Joy Nov 7 '17 at 16:51

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