6

Short : I have a solution to my problem, but it seems overkill so I wonder if I miss something.

Long : I have a 2 data Type, an Animal type and an Owner type. Both have same "attributes" age and name. For sake of simplicity, I want to be able to call age and name indifferenly on Animal and on Owner

type Age = Int
type Name = String

data AnimalType = Dog | Cat | Snake
 deriving (Read, Show,Eq)

--with  datatype and pattern matching
data Animal = Animal AnimalType Name Age
 deriving(Show, Eq)
name (Animal _ name _) = name 
age (Animal _ _ age) = age 
animalType (Animal animalType _ _) = animalType 

data Owner = Owner Name Age [Animal]
 deriving(Show,Eq)
name    (Owner name _      _) = name 
age     (Owner _    age    _) = age
animals (Owner _    _      animals) = animals

garfield = Animal Cat "Garfield" 8
rantanplan = Animal Dog "Rantanplan " 4
kaa = Animal Snake "Kaa" 15

dupond = Owner "Dupont" 28 [garfield, rantanplan]
bob = Owner "Bob" 35 [kaa]

This does not compile,

  Multiple declarations of `age'

The same thing does not work neither with Record syntax.

Doing so, one is forced to name differently age for Owner and age for Animal.

Then I dug a bit and found out that I could use typeclass to achieve that.

type Age = Int
type Name = String

class Nameable a where
 name:: a -> Name

class Ageable a where
 age:: a -> Age


data AnimalType = Dog | Cat | Snake
 deriving (Read, Show,Eq)

--with  datatype and pattern matching
data Animal = Animal AnimalType Name Age
 deriving(Show, Eq)

instance Nameable Animal where
 name (Animal _ name _) = name 

instance Ageable Animal where
 age (Animal _ _ age) = age

animalType (Animal animalType _ _) = animalType 


data Owner = Owner Name Age [Animal]
 deriving(Show,Eq)

instance Nameable Owner where 
 name (Owner name _ _) = name

instance Ageable Owner where
 age (Owner _ age _) = age

animals (Owner _    _      animals) = animals



garfield = Animal Cat "Garfield" 8
rantanplan = Animal Dog "Rantanplan " 4
kaa = Animal Snake "Kaa" 15

dupond = Owner "Dupont" 28 [garfield, rantanplan]
bob = Owner "Bob" 35 [kaa]

This approach is almost identical to usage of Interface in Java. The first one that does not work is closer to old C struct approach.

is there a quicker way to achieve the same result ?

  • 1
    Turn on DuplicateRecordFields and the records approach will work – Alec Nov 7 '17 at 15:16
  • A very similar question here Haskell record accessors shared by different constructors of the same data type. Provided your duplicate record accessors point to the same type i guess it should work. – Redu Nov 7 '17 at 22:44
  • 1
    @Redu no, here we have 2 different data types, Animal and Owner. – Will Ness Nov 7 '17 at 23:27
  • @Will Ness Yes you are right my bad. – Redu Nov 7 '17 at 23:53
  • @GhostCat : maybe you right for this case. Otherwise, no offence,but you should wonder what is worst : making a wrong triage or polluting a post with a private message not related at all to the topic. Best Regards – sandwood Sep 21 '18 at 11:46
6

Records (and their accessors) in Haskell are... suboptimal. That said, this particular issue regarding duplicate record fields has a workaround (since GHC 8.0) in the form of the DuplicateRecordFields extension. Note that the record accessors have to be used in an unambiguous fashion (there is no fancy polymorphism happening here).

{-# LANGUAGE DuplicateRecordFields #-}

type Age = Int
type Name = String

data AnimalType = Dog | Cat | Snake
  deriving (Read, Show, Eq)

data Animal = Animal
  { animalType :: AnimalType
  , name :: Name
  , age :: Age
  } deriving(Show, Eq)

data Owner = Owner
  { name :: Name
  , age :: Age
  , animals :: [Animal]
  } deriving(Show, Eq)

garfield = Animal Cat "Garfield" 8
rantanplan = Animal Dog "Rantanplan " 4
kaa = Animal Snake "Kaa" 15

dupond = Owner "Dupont" 28 [garfield, rantanplan]
bob = Owner "Bob" 35 [kaa] 
  • main = print $ name bob gives compiler error on ideone (8.0.1) and tio (8.0.2) both; works OK with OP's last code, which uses type classes. – Will Ness Nov 7 '17 at 20:56
  • Tip: DuplicateRecordFields works well with NamedFieldPuns and RecordWildcards, both for creating records and extracting fields. So one can write for example let Animal {name} = Animal Cat "Garfield" 8 without interfering with similar code for Owner in another function. – danidiaz Nov 7 '17 at 21:00
  • (had to disambiguate it by writing main = print $ (name :: Owner -> Name) bob). – Will Ness Nov 7 '17 at 21:08
  • I haven't used DuplicateRecordFields - is there any downside except for disambiguating, how are they working with lenses? – epsilonhalbe Nov 7 '17 at 23:13
  • 1
    @sandwood here's one that works. Could you show your code that doesn't? – Will Ness Nov 8 '17 at 9:54

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