My std::variant contains streamable types:

std::variant<int, std::string> a, b;
a = 1;
b = "hi";
std::cout << a << b << std::endl;

Compiling with g++7 with -std=c++1z returns compilation time errors.

An excerpt:

test.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)':
test.cpp:10:13: error: no match for 'operator<<' (operand types are 'std::ostream {aka std::basic_ostream<char>}' and 'std::variant<int, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >')
   std::cout << a << b << std::endl;
   ~~~~~~~~~~^~~~

Seemingly a std::variant<int, std::string> is not able to stream. How can I achieve that I can directly stream the variant to an output stream?

Expected output:

1hi
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This streams nested variants too.

template<class T>
struct streamer {
    const T& val;
};
template<class T> streamer(T) -> streamer<T>;

template<class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, streamer<T> s) {
    os << s.val;
    return os;
}

template<class... Ts>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, streamer<std::variant<Ts...>> sv) {
   std::visit([&os](const auto& v) { os << streamer{v}; }, sv.val);
   return os;
}

Use as:

std::cout << streamer{a} << streamer{b} << '\n';
  • 1
    Is there any reason for why this is not in the standard? – Claas Bontus Nov 8 '17 at 11:50
  • @ClaasBontus the usual answer: it wasn't proposed – sehe Nov 9 '17 at 9:26
  • 1
    Could someone clarify the line: template<class T> streamer(T) -> streamer<T>; – LeDYoM Nov 9 '17 at 23:00
  • @LeDYoM It allows template argument deduction for streamer class, so you don't need to write streamer<lots-of-stuff>{a}. Check section User-defined deduction guides from this article – nnovich-OK Jan 13 at 18:06

Not sure it's a good idea but I suppose you could define an operator<<() for std::variant.

Just for fun I've realized the one you can see in the following example (I suppose can be simplified a little)

#include <variant>
#include <iostream>

template <std::size_t I, typename T0, typename ... Ts>
std::enable_if_t<(I == 1U+sizeof...(Ts)), std::ostream &>
   streamV (std::ostream & s, std::variant<T0, Ts...> const &)
 { return s; }

template <std::size_t I, typename T0, typename ... Ts>
std::enable_if_t<(I < 1U+sizeof...(Ts)), std::ostream &>
   streamV (std::ostream & s, std::variant<T0, Ts...> const & v)
 { return I == v.index() ? s << std::get<I>(v) : streamV<I+1U>(s, v); }

template <typename T0, typename ... Ts>
std::ostream & operator<< (std::ostream & s, 
                           std::variant<T0, Ts...> const & v)
 { return streamV<0U>(s, v); }

int main ()
 {
   std::variant<int, std::string> a, b;
   a = 1;
   b = "hi";
   std::cout << a << b << std::endl;
}

-- EDIT --

Another way to write the streamV() helper function, without the T0, Ts... types but using std::variant_size_v

template <std::size_t I, typename V>
std::enable_if_t<(I == std::variant_size_v<V>), std::ostream &>
   streamV (std::ostream & s, V const &)
 { return s; }

template <std::size_t I, typename V>
std::enable_if_t<(I < std::variant_size_v<V>), std::ostream &>
   streamV (std::ostream & s, V const & v)
 { return I == v.index() ? s << std::get<I>(v) : streamV<I+1U>(s, v); }

-- EDIT 2 --

As pointed by T.C. (thanks!) I've only (with streamV()) implemented a less efficient, less interesting and less useful version of std::visit().

Using std::visit() my example could become a lot simpler

#include <variant>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T0, typename ... Ts>
std::ostream & operator<< (std::ostream & s,
                           std::variant<T0, Ts...> const & v)
 { std::visit([&](auto && arg){ s << arg;}, v); return s; }

int main ()
 {
   std::variant<int, std::string> a, b;
   a = 1;
   b = "hi";
   std::cout << a << b << std::endl;
}

I repeat: just for fun, because I don't think it's a good idea define operator<<() over a standard type.

I suggest the solution from T.C. that envelope the variant instance to stream in a specific class.

  • 4
    Let's not reimplement a linear-complexity version of std::visit. – T.C. Nov 7 '17 at 23:18
  • @T.C. - yes... I suppose I've reinvented the wheel another time :( – max66 Nov 7 '17 at 23:20

I think you must use the get function from the std, to get the streamable types and not the variant type itself.

Something like that

std::cout << std::get<int>(a) << std::get<std::string>(b) << std::endl;
  • 2
    In a practical situation I would be using std::variant in a container type and thus I do not know the type in advance. – Tom Nov 7 '17 at 22:53
  • 1
    You are right, my answer is wrong. I didn't catch the real meaning of the question. – miraklis Nov 7 '17 at 22:59

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