2

I have two classes; class A notifies class B about some events.

typedef void (*callbackb) (B *, int param1);

class A
{
  callbackb callme;
  B *parent;
};

class B
{
  A ai;
  void set_cb() { ai.callme = cb_handler; }
  static void cb_handler (B *obj, int param1) { obj->real_handler(param1); }
  void real_handler(int param1);
};

There are two equivalent declarations, callbackb and cb_handler, but one of them is a function pointer, and other one is a function. Is it possible to change one or both, so that both were linked to single prototype declaration?

3
  • This is somewhat of an antipattern. If class A should be strictly tied to class B, the proper type for callbackb is void (B::*)(int param) - a pointer to member. This eliminates the pointless cb_handler. But if class A should not be tied strictly, the proper type would be std::function<void(int)>, and you'd use a lambda or bind in B::set_cb to capture this.
    – MSalters
    Nov 8 '17 at 10:23
  • @MSalters, I can't use C++11 capabilities due to platform limitations, but this could be an interesting example, if you would wish to expand your comment into answer.
    – ZuOverture
    Nov 8 '17 at 11:25
  • It's not really an answer to the question you posed TBH. As for C++11, std::function is a formalization of boost::function. The latter was implemented in C++03.
    – MSalters
    Nov 8 '17 at 11:56
1

You can't define cb_handler like you want. But you certainly can declare them based off the same prototype and have the compiler check it. It also stops you from hiding pointer semantics, which is a good thing. Here's how:

  1. Define the callback as a function type:

    typedef void callbackb(B *, int param1);
    
  2. Declare the pointer and static member in terms of the CB type:

    class A
    {
      callbackb *callme; // The pointer is explicit
      B *parent;
    };
    
    // Later
    class B
    {
      // ...
      static inline callbackb cb_handler; // This is a function declaration
    };
    // And this is the inline definition, you can put it in a header
    inline void B::cb_handler (B *obj, int param1) { obj->real_handler(param1); }
    

So now cb_handler and callme are declared in terms of the same type. You need to specify the complete prototype when defining cb_handler, but it can still be an inline out-of-class definition in a header.

The compiler will check that the definition of cb_handler matches the declaration, so you'll be notified if cb_handler differs from callbackb.

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