The Rust book specifies that:

Another property that makes the stack fast is that all data on the stack must take up a known, fixed size.

It also says that String is stored on the heap as the size is not known and can mutate.

Where are "composite" data structures such as arrays containing String stored? The array is fixed in size however the components of the array can change in size.

let array: [String; 3] = ["A","B","C"];

What is the rule for where such "composite" data types are stored?

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Both.


A point of terminology: when discussing the memory layout of a type, one should not talk about stack vs heap, but about inline vs offline1:

  • inline means that the data is right here,
  • offline means that the data is available behind a pointer (wherever it points).

An easy example, integers are stored inline:

//  i32
+---+
| 3 |
+---+

A typical struct Point { x: i32, y: i32 } is also stored inline:

//  Point
+---+---+
| x | y |
+---+---+

A String, typically represented as struct String { data: *mut u8, len: usize, cap: usize } is stored both inline and offline:

//   String
+-------+-------+-------+
| data  |  len  |  cap  |
+-------+-------+-------+
    |
     \
      +-------------+
      |Hello, World!|
      +-------------+

The inline part is 3 pointers worth of storage, and the offline part, is a heap-allocated record containing the content of the string "Hello, World!" here.

However, inline does not always mean stack. A Box<Point>:

//  Box<Point>
+-------+
| data  |
+-------+
    |
     \
      +---+---+
      | x | y |
      +---+---+

Stores its Point (which stores its data members inline) on the heap!

And similarly, offline does not always mean heap:

fn main() {
    let i = 3;
    let r = &i;
}

Here, r is a reference (pointer), which points to i, and i is on the stack!

1 Yes, I am making this up, better terms would be appreciated.


So, back to the question:

It also says that String is stored on the heap as the size is not known and can mutate.

This is an approximation, as mentioned above the String has some of its data inline (pointer, length and capacity) and some on the heap (the string content).

Where are "composite" data structures such as arrays containing String stored? The array is fixed in size however the components of the array can change in size.

let array: [String; 3] = ["A","B","C"];

It is stored both on the stack and heap:

//  [String; 3]
+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+
| data  |  len  |  cap  | data  |  len  |  cap  | data  |  len  |  cap  |
+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+
    |                       |                       |    
     \                       \                       \
      +-+                     +-+                     +-+
      |A|                     |B|                     |C|
      +-+                     +-+                     +-+

That's 9 pointers' worth of data inline (here on the stack), and 3 separate allocations on the heap.

What is the rule for where such "composite" data types are stored?

Data-members are always inline, pointers and references may point to offline data, which may be on the heap, on the stack, etc...

  • One followup, is the "data" component of the String array stored next to each other or is it in different locations in the memory? That is, is it contiguous or not? – Greg Nov 8 '17 at 12:59
  • 1
    @Greg: I am not clear on what you are talking about, though it seems you mean the content (pointed to by data) of those 3 strings. If this is the case, then they are stored on 3 separate heap allocations, and whether those end up contiguous or not depends on the allocator; there is certainly no guarantee, which I why I drew them separately. – Matthieu M. Nov 8 '17 at 13:10
  • Thank you, that's exactly what I was referring to – Greg Nov 8 '17 at 13:14

String just wraps Vec<u8>. So this applies to all Vecs.

A Vec has a fixed size on the stack: It's length, capacity and a pointer to the heap where the actual contents are stored.

So having an array of three Strings on the stack means, that the "metadata" of these strings are on the stack (length, capacity and pointer to the data).

The actual data of these strings though is stored on the heap, as it is variable in length as you correctly identified.

  • 1
    In addition, here's a link to the Vec type guarantees that describes its allocation rules. – ljedrz Nov 8 '17 at 12:54

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