With the release of Java 9, numerous methods have been added to many classes, most (if not all) of which contain the following in their documentation:

Since: 9

Is there an easy way to find any new methods added in an arbitrary class without having to scour through its documentation?

Example: ByteBuffer.alignedSlice

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You're probably looking for something like jdkapidiff which uses japicmp to generate reports similar to one hosted here by the author - jdk8-jdk9-api-diff.

You can clone the project and execute mvn clean install to get the similar report on your local.

Provide a file ~.m2/toolchains.xml like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF8"?>
<toolchains>
    <toolchain>
        <type>jdk</type>
        <provides>
            <version>1.8</version>
            <vendor>oracle</vendor>
        </provides>
        <configuration>
            <jdkHome>/path/to/jdk-1.8</jdkHome>
        </configuration>
    </toolchain>
    <toolchain>
        <type>jdk</type>
        <provides>
            <version>9</version>
            <vendor>oracle</vendor>
        </provides>
        <configuration>
            <jdkHome>/path/to/jdk-9</jdkHome>
        </configuration>
    </toolchain>
</toolchains>
  • 5
    @nullpointer Unclear why anyone would downvote, this is clearly a good answer. In fact, I doubt a better one exists. – Nicolai Nov 8 '17 at 19:13
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    @pvg find any new methods added in an arbitrary class without having ... In the generated report, select that arbitrary class and then the NEW methods are the ones to look for in such case. They are added "Since: 9". – nullpointer Nov 8 '17 at 19:38
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    @nullpointer my point is japicmp does a comparison using reflection and finds the diffs. This may way well be what the poster actually wants. But if you literally wanted to find the ones with the specific javadoc tag, you can't reliably find them like this because that information is simply not in the compiled classes. – pvg Nov 8 '17 at 19:45
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    @pvg Agreed, that's also the reason I was wondering why we can see a dedicated "Deprecated" section in the javadocs but nothing for the sake of "Additions"(I am bad at naming), maybe in need for something like @Since(jdkVersion = "9") to process such fields and methods. :) – nullpointer Nov 8 '17 at 19:49
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    That link of the report that you posted was basically what I was looking for; thank you very much! – Jacob G. Nov 8 '17 at 23:39

There are many changes to existing classes and members, in addition to new @since 9 classes and members. The final release of JSR 379 include an annex with the complete set of diffs. The draft is online here: http://cr.openjdk.java.net/~iris/se/9/java-se-9-fr-spec-01/apidiffs/overview-summary.html

  • 2
    Unfortunately the diff reports tons of pseudo changes that turn out to be formatting changes, often not even having a visible effect… – Holger Nov 9 '17 at 9:21
  • @Holger one small question, why not clone the sources and grep for since 9, I am pretty sure I had a script that did that; or did I miss-understood something? – Eugene Nov 9 '17 at 12:01
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    @Eugene: then you get line numbers or the lines containing “since 9” and have to go great lengths to get the actual tagged member. Besides that, why is there website containing the API documentation when everyone can generate it from the sources? It makes life easier and it would be so easy for the standard doclet to generate a “What’s New” section based on @Since tags and it would be sooo useful, not only for the JDK API… – Holger Nov 9 '17 at 12:35

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