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I have a simple JFrame class with KeyListener and some method.

 public class MyClass extends JFrame{
     MyClass(){
        //build window
        addKeyListener(new KeyAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
               if(e.getKeyCode() == 32){
                   myMethod();
               }
            }
        });    
     }

     private void myMethod(){
        //do something
     }
 }

MyMethod works correctly if I call it from main(). But from Listener it does nothing. Can I call methods from KeyListener at all? And if answer is no, how can I solve this problem?

5
  • 1
    "Can I call method from KeyListener" - Yes, BUT, it's possible that the KeyListener is not called as it needs the component it is registered to to be focusable AND have keyboard focus. A better solution is to use the key bindings API instead – MadProgrammer Nov 8 '17 at 21:08
  • 2
    As with 99% of questions dealing with KeyListener, the answer is, use the Key Bindings API instead, it will fix 100% of KeyListeners issues ;) – MadProgrammer Nov 8 '17 at 21:09
  • You need to call JFrame.setVisible(true) in order for the frame to be shown and focusable. If it has focus, it will invoke the KeyListener, as already mentioned by MadProgrammer. – Izruo Nov 8 '17 at 21:09
  • @Izruo, I call setVisible(true) after constructor in main(). So, i'll try to use key bindings API – AlexandrM Nov 8 '17 at 21:17
  • if(e.getKeyCode() == 32) - don't use magic numbers. Nobody knows what 32 is. Use the appropriate KeyEvent.VK_??? variable. – camickr Nov 8 '17 at 21:59
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It depends how do you expect to use your JFrame. You need to create window with it by instantiating it from the main() method:

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // this is your frame instance
        MyClass frame = new MyClass();
    }
}

and you must implement all of the methods that KeyListener provides:

import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;
import java.awt.event.KeyListener;

import javax.swing.JFrame;

public class MyClass extends JFrame {

    public MyClass() {
        // "this." can be omitted, it is just for better understanding
        // that each method applies to instance of JFrame
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        this.setBounds(50, 50, 300, 300);
        this.setVisible(true);
        // add key listener
        this.addKeyListener(new KeyListener() {

            @Override
            public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {

            }

            @Override
            public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
                // call this method on key release
                myMethod(e.getKeyCode());   
            }

            @Override
            public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {

            }

        });
    }

    private void myMethod(int key) {
        this.setTitle("Key released: " + key);
    }
}
1
  • With KeyAdapter they don't need to implement all the functionality. This is still at the mercy of the focus related issues of KeyListener – MadProgrammer Nov 8 '17 at 22:35
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KeyListener is a pain in the ... code. It relies on the component it is registered to be focusable AND have keyboard focus.

In general, a better solution is to use the key bindings API. It gives you finer control over when the binding should be triggered.

For example

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;
import javax.swing.AbstractAction;
import javax.swing.ActionMap;
import javax.swing.InputMap;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.KeyStroke;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class MyClass extends JFrame {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
                myClass.pack();
                myClass.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                myClass.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public MyClass() {
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        // This is here because I don't like setSize or setPreferredSize
        JPanel panel = new JPanel() {
            @Override
            public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
                return new Dimension(300, 300);
            }
        };
        setContentPane(panel);

        InputMap im = panel.getInputMap(JComponent.WHEN_IN_FOCUSED_WINDOW);
        ActionMap am = panel.getActionMap();

        im.put(KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(KeyEvent.VK_SPACE, 0), "spaced");
        am.put("spaced", new AbstractAction() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                myMethod();
            }
        });
    }

    private void myMethod() {
        System.out.println("Pressed");
    }
}

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