0

I want to remove empty <p></p> from my page. This works great with $('p:empty').remove();. But I also have some <p>'s on my page, that look like this (only containing a lot of white spaces):

<p>
                                        </p>

And unfortunately, they are not recognized as empty.

How can I remove them?

5

Something like this should work:

$('p').each(function() {
    if ($(this).text().trim().length == 0) {
        $(this).remove()
    }
});
  • what if you have <p><div></div></p> ? This method doesn't work then – Ben Bozorg Nov 8 '17 at 21:56
  • 1
    True, but that's not what was requested:) – John Ellmore Nov 8 '17 at 21:57
  • @alen Wow, you really know how to be nice to other people :P – Zoker Nov 8 '17 at 21:59
  • @JohnEllmore Cool. – Ben Bozorg Nov 8 '17 at 22:01
  • I liked the version which used el instead of this. It was more readable. – Josef Engelfrost Nov 8 '17 at 22:10
2

Use this method:

1- Get the inner html of it 2- trim it 3-compare it with ""

$('p').each(function() {
     var $p = $(this);
     if($.trim($p.html())==='') {
        $p.remove();
     }
});
1

You can use RegEx for this. We simply look for anything that starts and ends with spacing with nothing in between(line breaks, spaces, tabs): ^\s+$ and remove the node. We do the same if the node contains nothing^$.

let paragraphs = document.querySelectorAll("p");
paragraphs.forEach(paragraph => {
  if ((/^\s+$|^$/gm).test(paragraph.textContent)) paragraph.parentNode.removeChild(paragraph);
});

let paragraphs = document.querySelectorAll("p");
paragraphs.forEach(paragraph => {
  if ((/^\s+$|^$/gm).test(paragraph.textContent)) {
    paragraph.parentNode.removeChild(paragraph);
    console.log(paragraph, "removed");
  }
});
<p>

</p>

<p> hola </p>

<p> </p>

<p> </p>

<p> hiya </p>
<p> </p>
<p></p>

  • Creating a new RegEx in each iteration must be much less efficient than just using .trim() like in the other solutions. Nice to have a plain JS solution though along with the others. – Josef Engelfrost Nov 8 '17 at 22:14
  • @JosefEngelfrost in standard JS it appears that .trim would be faster, but in this current circumstance using JQuery, this pulls out ahead jsperf.com/trim-vs-regex-for-replacing-string – zfrisch Nov 8 '17 at 22:27
  • Absolutely, jQuery slows things down. I was more interested in replacing your RegEx with native String.prototype.trim() (since your is the answer optimised for speed). I get mixed results, trim() is faster most of the time in by browser, but not always. jsperf.com/native-string-trim-vs-regex – Josef Engelfrost Nov 8 '17 at 22:56

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