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next is a binary relation.

This string:

A\\\,B

is modeled by this next table:

The "next" table which models <code>A\\\,B</code>

Consider the first column of the first row of the table. It's value is A. From A we can get to Backslash0, then Backslash1, then Backslash2, then Backslash3, then Comma0, and then B. So, the number of Backslashes between A and the first reachable non-backslash value (which in this case is Comma0) is an odd number (3). Yea! That is what I want. If the first reachable non-backslash value was a non-comma, then the number of intervening Backslashes must be even (0, 2, 4, ...).

How do I express this constraint in Alloy:

For each non-backslash value c in the first column of the next table: If the first non-backslash value c' reachable from c is a comma, then the number of backslashes between c and c' must be odd (1, 3, 5, ...). If the first non-backslash value c' reachable from c is a non-comma, then the number of backslashes between c and c' must be even (0, 2, 4, ...).

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I wonder if you're modeling this at the right level of abstraction. Is it necessary to consider the structure of the backslash sequence? What if you had two tokens, the double-backslash and backslash-comma, and just said required backslash-comma to be preceded by double-backslash and followed by non-backslash?

| improve this answer | |
  • Hi @Daniel Jackson. I already tried the more abstract approach (see my SO post titled "Is this Alloy model cheating". I wanted to see if the less abstract approach could be modeled in Alloy. – Roger Costello Nov 9 '17 at 11:41
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    I believe that your questions (is it cheating ? am I doing the right thing? is it the right level of abstraction?) can't be properly addressed if you don't tell us explicitly the purpose of your model. – Loïc Gammaitoni Nov 10 '17 at 8:45

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