-3

So I have this code in my main function

if(mesType == 1) {
        cin.ignore();
        Message mes1;
        stack1.push(&mes1);
} else if(mesType == 2) {
        cin.ignore();
        MorseCodeMessage mes2;
        stack1.push(&mes2);
}

and here is the function

void MessageStack::push(Message *ms1) {
    messages.push_back(ms1);    
}

where messages is

vector <Message*> messages;

Can you explain why all the elements in my messages vector are being replaced by whatever I push last?

  • Do note that you are pushing pointers to your stack that immediately become dangling pointers. So you are storing pointers that are meaningless – Justin Nov 8 '17 at 22:39
  • 2
    You are pushing the address of a local variable that is destroyed after that. That’s a useless address, dereferencing it is undefined behavior. – user2672107 Nov 8 '17 at 22:39
  • Well I need them to be pointers since I need my vector to be able to handle both types, since MorseCodeMessage is a child of the Message class and I'm using both in the vector – Caleb lee Nov 8 '17 at 22:41
  • Than you need to allocate them on the free store. Read a good C++ book, you can’t learn C++ by trial and error. – user2672107 Nov 8 '17 at 22:44
  • @Caleblee Then you need them to be stored somewhere non-local. I recommend having your vector actually be a vector of unique_ptr, because there’s very little reason to do memory management manually in modern C++. – Daniel H Nov 8 '17 at 22:45
1
0

You are pushing pointers to local variables, which very likely yields undefined behaviour; if the local object has not gone out of scope, you have a chance to repeatedly push the address of the same object (local variable). Note that the content of the local variable will change, and all previously pushed addresses still point to the same object.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

You are pushing pointers to local variables that go out of scope after each push. Stack space gets reused over time, so you likely end up with multiple pointers that are pointing at the same stack memory, but the pointers in the vector are technically dangling and using them is undefined behavior.

Since you clearly have polymorphic classes that derive from Message, you need to allocate them dynamically with new so they stay alive while stored in the vector:

if(mesType == 1) {
    cin.ignore();
    Message *mes1 = new Message;
    stack1.push(mes1);
} else if(mesType == 2) {
    cin.ignore();
    MorseCodeMessage *mes2 = new MorseCodeMessage;
    stack1.push(mes2);
}

Don't forget to define Message with a virtual destructor, and then call delete on each pointer when you are done using the vector, or when removing items from the vector. Otherwise you will have memory leaks.

In C++11 and later, a safer solution is to use std::unique_ptr instead of raw pointers:

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Message>> messages;

void MessageStack::push(std::unique_ptr<Message> ms1) {
    messages.push_back(std::move(ms1));
}

...

if(mesType == 1) {
    cin.ignore();
    stack1.push(std::unique_ptr<Message>(new Message));
    // or, in C++14 and later:
    //stack1.push(std::make_unique<Message>());
} else if(mesType == 2) {
    cin.ignore();
    stack1.push(std::unique_ptr<Message>(new MorseCodeMessage));
    // or, in C++14 and later:
    //stack1.push(std::make_unique<MorseCodeMessage>());
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.