I want to permute a vector so that an element can't be in the same place after permutation, as it was in the original. Let's say I have a list of elements like this: AABBCCADEF

A valid shuffle would be: BBAADEFCCA

But these would be invalid: BAACFEDCAB or BCABFEDCAB

The closest answer I could find was this: python shuffle such that position will never repeat. But that's not quite what I want, because there are no repeated elements in that example.

I want a fast algorithm that generalizes that answer in the case of repetitions.

MWE:

library(microbenchmark)

set.seed(1)
x <- sample(letters, size=295, replace=T)

terrible_implementation <- function(x) {
  xnew <- sample(x)
  while(any(x == xnew)) {
    xnew <- sample(x)
  }
  return(xnew)
}

microbenchmark(terrible_implementation(x), times=10)


Unit: milliseconds
                       expr      min       lq    mean  median       uq      max neval
 terrible_implementation(x) 479.5338 2346.002 4738.49 2993.29 4858.254 17005.05    10

Also, how do I determine if a sequence can be permuted in such a way?

EDIT: To make it perfectly clear what I want, the new vector should satisfy the following conditions:

1) all(table(newx) == table(x)) 2) all(x != newx)

E.g.:

newx <- terrible_implementation(x)
all(table(newx) == table(x))
[1] TRUE
all(x != newx)
[1] TRUE
  • A vague guess at deciding if the sequence is shuffle-able like this is that the most common element has to have at most N / 2 repeats - the sequence definitely becomes unshuffleable beyond that, not sure if there are other ways for unshuffleability to occur. – Marius Nov 9 '17 at 0:44
  • What's wrong with your implementation? – Hugh Nov 9 '17 at 2:20
  • I thought I could be clever and only subscramble the elements that did not satisfy the condition. Of course, this won't work if there are more pigeons than pigeonholes. – Hugh Nov 9 '17 at 2:48
  • 1
    @Hugh it's way too slow. My real data is more like a vector of 1 million, and 1000 unique elements. – thc Nov 9 '17 at 4:09
  • 1
    That would change the number of each letter. E.g., if my original was ABCC, BCAA wouldn't be valid. – thc Nov 9 '17 at 4:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this satisfies all your conditions. The idea is to order by the frequency, start with the most common element and shift the value to the next value in the frequency table by the number of times the most common element appears. This will guarantee all elements will be missed.

I've written in data.table, as it helped me during debugging, without losing too much performance. It's a modest improvement performance-wise.

library(data.table)
library(magrittr)
library(microbenchmark)


permute_avoid_same_position <- function(y) {
  DT <- data.table(orig = y)
  DT[, orig_order := .I]

  count_by_letter <- 
    DT[, .N, keyby = orig] %>%
    .[order(N)] %>%
    .[, stable_order := .I] %>%
    .[order(-stable_order)] %>%
    .[]

  out <- copy(DT)[count_by_letter, .(orig, orig_order, N), on = "orig"]
  # Dummy element
  out[, new := first(y)]
  origs <- out[["orig"]]
  nrow_out <- nrow(out)
  maxN <- count_by_letter[["N"]][1]

  out[seq_len(nrow_out) > maxN, new := head(origs, nrow_out - maxN)]
  out[seq_len(nrow_out) <= maxN, new := tail(origs, maxN)]

  DT[out, j = .(orig_order, orig, new), on = "orig_order"] %>%
    .[order(orig_order)] %>%
    .[["new"]]
}

set.seed(1)
x <- sample(letters, size=295, replace=T)
testthat::expect_true(all(table(permute_avoid_same_position(x)) == table(x)))
testthat::expect_true(all(x != permute_avoid_same_position(x)))
microbenchmark(permute_avoid_same_position(x), times = 5)

# Unit: milliseconds
#                           expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max
# permute_avoid_same_position(x) 5.650378 5.771753 5.875116 5.788618 5.938604 6.226228

x <- sample(1:1000, replace = TRUE, size = 1e6)
testthat::expect_true(all(table(permute_avoid_same_position(x)) == table(x)))
testthat::expect_true(all(x != permute_avoid_same_position(x)))

microbenchmark(permute_avoid_same_position(x), times = 5)
# Unit: milliseconds
#                           expr      min       lq    mean   median       uq      max
# permute_avoid_same_position(x) 239.7744 385.4686 401.521 438.2999 440.9746 503.0875
  • Thanks! This works well. The solution actually seems kind of obvious after you describe the algorithm, lol. – thc Nov 9 '17 at 20:52
  • Great: FYI - I removed the performance bottleneck since you accepted. – Hugh Nov 9 '17 at 23:57
#DATA
set.seed(1)
x <- sample(letters, size=295, replace=T)

foo = function(S){
    if(max(table(S)) > length(S)/2){
        stop("NOT POSSIBLE")
    }
    U = unique(S)
    done_chrs = character(0)
    inds = integer(0)
    ans = character(0)
    while(!identical(sort(done_chrs), sort(U))){
        my_chrs = U[!U %in% done_chrs]
        next_chr = my_chrs[which.min(sapply(my_chrs, function(x) length(setdiff(which(!S %in% x), inds))))]
        x_inds = which(S %in% next_chr)
        candidates = setdiff(seq_along(S), union(x_inds, inds))
        if (length(candidates) == 1){
            new_inds = candidates
        }else{
            new_inds = sample(candidates, length(x_inds))
        }
        inds = c(inds, new_inds)
        ans[new_inds] = next_chr
        done_chrs = c(done_chrs, next_chr)
    }
    return(ans)
}

ans_foo = foo(x)

identical(sort(ans_foo), sort(x)) & !any(ans_foo == x)
#[1] TRUE

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(foo(x))
#Unit: milliseconds
#   expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
# foo(x) 19.49833 22.32517 25.65675 24.85059 27.96838 48.61194   100
  • Does this guarantee a solution if one exists? – thc Nov 9 '17 at 4:19

We could extract substrings by the boundary of the repeating elements, sample and replicate

library(stringr)
sapply(replicate(10, sample(str_extract_all(str1, "([[:alpha:]])\\1*")[[1]]),
                simplify = FALSE), paste, collapse="")
#[1] "BBAAEFDCCA" "AAAFBBEDCC" "BBAAAEFCCD" "DFACCBBAAE" "AAFCCBBEAD" 
#[6] "DAAAECCBBF" "AAFCCDBBEA" "CCEFADBBAA" "BBAAEADCCF" "AACCBBDFAE"

data

str1 <- "AABBCCADEF"
  • Please have a look at the MWE. Your solution didn't work on that. – thc Nov 9 '17 at 4:56
  • @thc It is based on your description A valid shuffle would be: BBAADEFCCA But these would be invalid: BAACFEDCAB or BCABFEDCAB – akrun Nov 9 '17 at 4:56
  • I understand, but it doesn't work even if I increased replicate from 10 to 1000 on the MWE (not the BBAADEFCCA string). – thc Nov 9 '17 at 4:58
  • @thc If you are looking for unique, then use !duplicated or unique – akrun Nov 9 '17 at 4:58
  • 4
    Yes, it is different than the conditions required by the question. That's why it doesn't work on the example I posted. – thc Nov 9 '17 at 6:06

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