51

From the man page for XFillPolygon:

  • If shape is Complex, the path may self-intersect. Note that contiguous coincident points in the path are not treated as self-intersection.

  • If shape is Convex, for every pair of points inside the polygon, the line segment connecting them does not intersect the path. If known by the client, specifying Convex can improve performance. If you specify Convex for a path that is not convex, the graphics results are undefined.

  • If shape is Nonconvex, the path does not self-intersect, but the shape is not wholly convex. If known by the client, specifying Nonconvex instead of Complex may improve performance. If you specify Nonconvex for a self-intersecting path, the graphics results are undefined.

I am having performance problems with fill XFillPolygon and, as the man page suggests, the first step I want to take is to specify the correct shape of the polygon. I am currently using Complex to be on the safe side.

Is there an efficient algorithm to determine if a polygon (defined by a series of coordinates) is convex, non-convex or complex?

4
113

You can make things a lot easier than the Gift-Wrapping Algorithm... that's a good answer when you have a set of points w/o any particular boundary and need to find the convex hull.

In contrast, consider the case where the polygon is not self-intersecting, and it consists of a set of points in a list where the consecutive points form the boundary. In this case it is much easier to figure out whether a polygon is convex or not (and you don't have to calculate any angles, either):

For each consecutive pair of edges of the polygon (each triplet of points), compute the z-component of the cross product of the vectors defined by the edges pointing towards the points in increasing order. Take the cross product of these vectors:

 given p[k], p[k+1], p[k+2] each with coordinates x, y:
 dx1 = x[k+1]-x[k]
 dy1 = y[k+1]-y[k]
 dx2 = x[k+2]-x[k+1]
 dy2 = y[k+2]-y[k+1]
 zcrossproduct = dx1*dy2 - dy1*dx2

The polygon is convex if the z-components of the cross products are either all positive or all negative. Otherwise the polygon is nonconvex.

If there are N points, make sure you calculate N cross products, e.g. be sure to use the triplets (p[N-2],p[N-1],p[0]) and (p[N-1],p[0],p[1]).


If the polygon is self-intersecting, then it fails the technical definition of convexity even if its directed angles are all in the same direction, in which case the above approach would not produce the correct result.

5
  • 5
    Correct me if I am wrong, but won't this fail for some complex polygons? For instance [[1 3] [9 7] [7 9] [7 2] [9 6] [1 8]]] – zenna May 28 '13 at 5:39
  • 3
    amazingly wrong answer, with all these upvotes. self-intersecting loop will pass this algorithm with flying colors. – Will Ness Jan 16 '18 at 13:06
  • 4
    I have updated this answer. Commenters are correct that it doesn't address the complex case, but it still has value. – Jason S Mar 27 '18 at 20:16
  • 1
    It only addresses part of the question, this is true. That's why it wasn't accepted. Other people have obviously found this question and been able to guarantee they don't have the complex case, thus found this answer useful. – TurnipEntropy Sep 30 '18 at 18:16
  • Kinda confused how to do this for N points like a quadrilateral. Your last paragraph regarding N points is a bit hard to decipher. – WDUK Jun 25 at 21:31
27

This question is now the first item in either Bing or Google when you search for "determine convex polygon." However, none of the answers are good enough.

The (now deleted) answer by @EugeneYokota works by checking whether an unordered set of points can be made into a convex polygon, but that's not what the OP asked for. He asked for a method to check whether a given polygon is convex or not. (A "polygon" in computer science is usually defined [as in the XFillPolygon documentation] as an ordered array of 2D points, with consecutive points joined with a side as well as the last point to the first.) Also, the gift wrapping algorithm in this case would have the time-complexity of O(n^2) for n points - which is much larger than actually needed to solve this problem, while the question asks for an efficient algorithm.

@JasonS's answer, along with the other answers that follow his idea, accepts star polygons such as a pentagram or the one in @zenna's comment, but star polygons are not considered to be convex. As @plasmacel notes in a comment, this is a good approach to use if you have prior knowledge that the polygon is not self-intersecting, but it can fail if you do not have that knowledge.

@Sekhat's answer is correct but it also has the time-complexity of O(n^2) and thus is inefficient.

@LorenPechtel's added answer after her edit is the best one here but it is vague.

A correct algorithm with optimal complexity

The algorithm I present here has the time-complexity of O(n), correctly tests whether a polygon is convex or not, and passes all the tests I have thrown at it. The idea is to traverse the sides of the polygon, noting the direction of each side and the signed change of direction between consecutive sides. "Signed" here means left-ward is positive and right-ward is negative (or the reverse) and straight-ahead is zero. Those angles are normalized to be between minus-pi (exclusive) and pi (inclusive). Summing all these direction-change angles (a.k.a the deflection angles) together will result in plus-or-minus one turn (i.e. 360 degrees) for a convex polygon, while a star-like polygon (or a self-intersecting loop) will have a different sum ( n * 360 degrees, for n turns overall, for polygons where all the deflection angles are of the same sign). So we must check that the sum of the direction-change angles is plus-or-minus one turn. We also check that the direction-change angles are all positive or all negative and not reverses (pi radians), all points are actual 2D points, and that no consecutive vertices are identical. (That last point is debatable--you may want to allow repeated vertices but I prefer to prohibit them.) The combination of those checks catches all convex and non-convex polygons.

Here is code for Python 3 that implements the algorithm and includes some minor efficiencies. The code looks longer than it really is due to the the comment lines and the bookkeeping involved in avoiding repeated point accesses.

TWO_PI = 2 * pi

def is_convex_polygon(polygon):
    """Return True if the polynomial defined by the sequence of 2D
    points is 'strictly convex': points are valid, side lengths non-
    zero, interior angles are strictly between zero and a straight
    angle, and the polygon does not intersect itself.

    NOTES:  1.  Algorithm: the signed changes of the direction angles
                from one side to the next side must be all positive or
                all negative, and their sum must equal plus-or-minus
                one full turn (2 pi radians). Also check for too few,
                invalid, or repeated points.
            2.  No check is explicitly done for zero internal angles
                (180 degree direction-change angle) as this is covered
                in other ways, including the `n < 3` check.
    """
    try:  # needed for any bad points or direction changes
        # Check for too few points
        if len(polygon) < 3:
            return False
        # Get starting information
        old_x, old_y = polygon[-2]
        new_x, new_y = polygon[-1]
        new_direction = atan2(new_y - old_y, new_x - old_x)
        angle_sum = 0.0
        # Check each point (the side ending there, its angle) and accum. angles
        for ndx, newpoint in enumerate(polygon):
            # Update point coordinates and side directions, check side length
            old_x, old_y, old_direction = new_x, new_y, new_direction
            new_x, new_y = newpoint
            new_direction = atan2(new_y - old_y, new_x - old_x)
            if old_x == new_x and old_y == new_y:
                return False  # repeated consecutive points
            # Calculate & check the normalized direction-change angle
            angle = new_direction - old_direction
            if angle <= -pi:
                angle += TWO_PI  # make it in half-open interval (-Pi, Pi]
            elif angle > pi:
                angle -= TWO_PI
            if ndx == 0:  # if first time through loop, initialize orientation
                if angle == 0.0:
                    return False
                orientation = 1.0 if angle > 0.0 else -1.0
            else:  # if other time through loop, check orientation is stable
                if orientation * angle <= 0.0:  # not both pos. or both neg.
                    return False
            # Accumulate the direction-change angle
            angle_sum += angle
        # Check that the total number of full turns is plus-or-minus 1
        return abs(round(angle_sum / TWO_PI)) == 1
    except (ArithmeticError, TypeError, ValueError):
        return False  # any exception means not a proper convex polygon
17
  • Here is a somewhat related, but easier approach without the need of trigonometric functions: math.stackexchange.com/questions/1743995/… – plasmacel Jul 29 '17 at 18:35
  • 2
    @plasmacel: That approach, like JasonS's answer, accepts star polygons such as a pentagram or the one in zenna's comment. If star polygons are acceptable, that is indeed better than my approach, but star polygons are not usually considered to be convex. This is why I took the time to write and test this function that rejects star polygons. Also, thanks for your edit--it did improve my answer. However, you did change the meaning of one sentence, so I'm editing that again--I hope it is more clear this time. – Rory Daulton Jul 29 '17 at 19:17
  • Star polygons are non just non-convex, but also self-intersecting. Your answer may extend the test to handle self-intersecting polygons correctly (good to have such a solution), however if only non-self-intersecting simple polygons are considered, then the mixed product (called zcrossproduct by @Jason) approach is preferable. – plasmacel Jul 29 '17 at 19:40
  • @plasmacel: Good point that JasonS's approach is good if you have prior knowledge that the polygon is not self-intersecting. I wanted to focus on the "convex" issue, which is what others were also focusing on. I also wanted a function that makes no assumptions at all on the polygon--my routine even checks that the "points" in the array actually are structures containing two values, i.e. point coordinates. – Rory Daulton Jul 29 '17 at 19:53
  • 1
    @RoryDaulton: I'm the author of the aforementioned answer to another question, but missed the notes here! I rewrote that answer; please re-compare to yours. To account for self-intersecting (bowtie or star-shaped, for example) polygons, it is sufficient to calculate the number of sign changes (ignoring zero as if it had no sign) in the edge vectors' $x$ and $y$ components; there are exactly two, each, for a convex polygon. atan2() is slow. I can provide a Python implementation too, if desired, for comparison. – Nominal Animal Mar 26 '18 at 20:38
15

The following Java function/method is an implementation of the algorithm described in this answer.

public boolean isConvex()
{
    if (_vertices.size() < 4)
        return true;

    boolean sign = false;
    int n = _vertices.size();

    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        double dx1 = _vertices.get((i + 2) % n).X - _vertices.get((i + 1) % n).X;
        double dy1 = _vertices.get((i + 2) % n).Y - _vertices.get((i + 1) % n).Y;
        double dx2 = _vertices.get(i).X - _vertices.get((i + 1) % n).X;
        double dy2 = _vertices.get(i).Y - _vertices.get((i + 1) % n).Y;
        double zcrossproduct = dx1 * dy2 - dy1 * dx2;

        if (i == 0)
            sign = zcrossproduct > 0;
        else if (sign != (zcrossproduct > 0))
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

The algorithm is guaranteed to work as long as the vertices are ordered (either clockwise or counter-clockwise), and you don't have self-intersecting edges (i.e. it only works for simple polygons).

1
  • Wouldn't "fix" the "self-intersecting polygon issue" the addition of using the values held in "zcrossproduct" to check if the polygon does or not perform a perfect 360° twist? – Marco Ottina Dec 2 '19 at 12:28
10

Here's a test to check if a polygon is convex.

Consider each set of three points along the polygon. If every angle is 180 degrees or less you have a convex polygon. When you figure out each angle, also keep a running total of (180 - angle). For a convex polygon, this will total 360.

This test runs in O(n) time.

Note, also, that in most cases this calculation is something you can do once and save — most of the time you have a set of polygons to work with that don't go changing all the time.

0
4

To test if a polygon is convex, every point of the polygon should be level with or behind each line.

Here's an example picture:

enter image description here

4
  • 5
    I have no idea what this means. What does it mean for a point to be level, behind, or in front of a line? – emory Oct 16 '15 at 1:26
  • This should clarify things a bit: stackoverflow.com/questions/1560492/… – James Hill Feb 17 '16 at 21:49
  • This is very vague. This isn't an algorithm. Could you expand and explain without vague links and simply edit the answer? – Discrete lizard Mar 25 '18 at 16:56
  • The criterion basically amounts to the definition of a convex polygon as the intersection of half planes, or of the convex hull. Since being convex for a polygon is tantamount to being its own convex hull, computing that hull admits to a convexity test, albeit with non-optimal complexity of O(n log n). This also would not distinguish between complex and non-convex simple polygons. – collapsar Jun 19 '19 at 10:46
3

The answer by @RoryDaulton seems the best to me, but what if one of the angles is exactly 0? Some may want such an edge case to return True, in which case, change "<=" to "<" in the line :

if orientation * angle < 0.0:  # not both pos. or both neg.

Here are my test cases which highlight the issue :

# A square    
assert is_convex_polygon( ((0,0), (1,0), (1,1), (0,1)) )

# This LOOKS like a square, but it has an extra point on one of the edges.
assert is_convex_polygon( ((0,0), (0.5,0), (1,0), (1,1), (0,1)) )

The 2nd assert fails in the original answer. Should it? For my use case, I would prefer it didn't.

2
  • Ah, the edge cases. Good to see that you're taking care of them! Algorithms researchers tend to ignore those (as this is really implementation). The general problem here is that most geometric primitives are inexact, so '<=' and '<' are expected to have the same behaviour! However, implementing geometrical algorithms correctly is, for this reason, very hard. – Discrete lizard Mar 25 '18 at 16:58
  • Change the if ndx == 0 .. else with if not np.isclose(angle, 0.): # only check if direction actually changed if orientation is None: orientation = np.sign(angle) elif orientation != np.sign(angle): return False and it should work also for your edge case. Also add an orientation = None before the loop. – ElRudi Oct 14 '20 at 19:18
3

This method would work on simple polygons (no self intersecting edges) assuming that the vertices are ordered (either clockwise or counter)

For an array of vertices:

vertices = [(0,0),(1,0),(1,1),(0,1)]

The following python implementation checks whether the z component of all the cross products have the same sign

def zCrossProduct(a,b,c):
   return (a[0]-b[0])*(b[1]-c[1])-(a[1]-b[1])*(b[0]-c[0])

def isConvex(vertices):
    if len(vertices)<4:
        return True
    signs= [zCrossProduct(a,b,c)>0 for a,b,c in zip(vertices[2:],vertices[1:],vertices)]
    return all(signs) or not any(signs)
0
2

I implemented both algorithms: the one posted by @UriGoren (with a small improvement - only integer math) and the one from @RoryDaulton, in Java. I had some problems because my polygon is closed, so both algorithms were considering the second as concave, when it was convex. So i changed it to prevent such situation. My methods also uses a base index (which can be or not 0).

These are my test vertices:

// concave
int []x = {0,100,200,200,100,0,0};
int []y = {50,0,50,200,50,200,50};

// convex
int []x = {0,100,200,100,0,0};
int []y = {50,0,50,200,200,50};

And now the algorithms:

private boolean isConvex1(int[] x, int[] y, int base, int n) // Rory Daulton
{
  final double TWO_PI = 2 * Math.PI;

  // points is 'strictly convex': points are valid, side lengths non-zero, interior angles are strictly between zero and a straight
  // angle, and the polygon does not intersect itself.
  // NOTES:  1.  Algorithm: the signed changes of the direction angles from one side to the next side must be all positive or
  // all negative, and their sum must equal plus-or-minus one full turn (2 pi radians). Also check for too few,
  // invalid, or repeated points.
  //      2.  No check is explicitly done for zero internal angles(180 degree direction-change angle) as this is covered
  // in other ways, including the `n < 3` check.

  // needed for any bad points or direction changes
  // Check for too few points
  if (n <= 3) return true;
  if (x[base] == x[n-1] && y[base] == y[n-1]) // if its a closed polygon, ignore last vertex
     n--;
  // Get starting information
  int old_x = x[n-2], old_y = y[n-2];
  int new_x = x[n-1], new_y = y[n-1];
  double new_direction = Math.atan2(new_y - old_y, new_x - old_x), old_direction;
  double angle_sum = 0.0, orientation=0;
  // Check each point (the side ending there, its angle) and accum. angles for ndx, newpoint in enumerate(polygon):
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
  {
     // Update point coordinates and side directions, check side length
     old_x = new_x; old_y = new_y; old_direction = new_direction;
     int p = base++;
     new_x = x[p]; new_y = y[p];
     new_direction = Math.atan2(new_y - old_y, new_x - old_x);
     if (old_x == new_x && old_y == new_y)
        return false; // repeated consecutive points
     // Calculate & check the normalized direction-change angle
     double angle = new_direction - old_direction;
     if (angle <= -Math.PI)
        angle += TWO_PI;  // make it in half-open interval (-Pi, Pi]
     else if (angle > Math.PI)
        angle -= TWO_PI;
     if (i == 0)  // if first time through loop, initialize orientation
     {
        if (angle == 0.0) return false;
        orientation = angle > 0 ? 1 : -1;
     }
     else  // if other time through loop, check orientation is stable
     if (orientation * angle <= 0)  // not both pos. or both neg.
        return false;
     // Accumulate the direction-change angle
     angle_sum += angle;
     // Check that the total number of full turns is plus-or-minus 1
  }
  return Math.abs(Math.round(angle_sum / TWO_PI)) == 1;
}

And now from Uri Goren

private boolean isConvex2(int[] x, int[] y, int base, int n)
{
  if (n < 4)
     return true;
  boolean sign = false;
  if (x[base] == x[n-1] && y[base] == y[n-1]) // if its a closed polygon, ignore last vertex
     n--;
  for(int p=0; p < n; p++)
  {
     int i = base++;
     int i1 = i+1; if (i1 >= n) i1 = base + i1-n;
     int i2 = i+2; if (i2 >= n) i2 = base + i2-n;
     int dx1 = x[i1] - x[i];
     int dy1 = y[i1] - y[i];
     int dx2 = x[i2] - x[i1];
     int dy2 = y[i2] - y[i1];
     int crossproduct = dx1*dy2 - dy1*dx2;
     if (i == base)
        sign = crossproduct > 0;
     else
     if (sign != (crossproduct > 0))
        return false;
  }
  return true;
}
0

Adapted Uri's code into matlab. Hope this may help.

Be aware that Uri's algorithm only works for simple polygons! So, be sure to test if the polygon is simple first!

% M [ x1 x2 x3 ...
%     y1 y2 y3 ...]
% test if a polygon is convex

function ret = isConvex(M)
    N = size(M,2);
    if (N<4)
        ret = 1;
        return;
    end

    x0 = M(1, 1:end);
    x1 = [x0(2:end), x0(1)];
    x2 = [x0(3:end), x0(1:2)];
    y0 = M(2, 1:end);
    y1 = [y0(2:end), y0(1)];
    y2 = [y0(3:end), y0(1:2)];
    dx1 = x2 - x1;
    dy1 = y2 - y1;
    dx2 = x0 - x1;
    dy2 = y0 - y1;
    zcrossproduct = dx1 .* dy2 - dy1 .* dx2;

    % equality allows two consecutive edges to be parallel
    t1 = sum(zcrossproduct >= 0);  
    t2 = sum(zcrossproduct <= 0);  
    ret = t1 == N || t2 == N;

end

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.