4

I'm trying to make sorting easier for an C# Application and C# Web API. I'm using Entity Framework Core for my persistence and testing.

In my application or Web API I determine the Order, Descending or Ascending, Property Name.

I pass this knowledge into my repository where a Linq query is created and executed. The problem is when I have a decimal column its doing a string order rather than a decimal order.

public static class SortingExtensions
{
    public static IQueryable<T> SortBy<T>(
        this IQueryable<T> queryable,
        Sorting sorting)
    {
        IOrderedQueryable<T> orderedQueryable = null;

        sorting.SortableEntities
            .OrderBy(x => x.Order)
            .ToList()
            .ForEach(sortableEntity =>
            {
                Expression<Func<T, object>> expression = QueryHelper.GetDefaultSortExpression<T>(sortableEntity);
                if (expression != null)
                {
                    orderedQueryable = orderedQueryable == null
                        ? queryable.OrderBy(expression, sortableEntity.Descending)
                        : orderedQueryable.OrderBy(expression, sortableEntity.Descending);
                }
            });

        return orderedQueryable;
    }

    private static IOrderedQueryable<T> OrderBy<T, TKey>(
        this IOrderedQueryable<T> query,
        Expression<Func<T, TKey>> keySelector,
        bool descending) => descending ? query.ThenByDescending(keySelector) : query.ThenBy(keySelector);

    private static IOrderedQueryable<T> OrderBy<T, TKey>(
        this IQueryable<T> query,
        Expression<Func<T, TKey>> keySelector,
        bool descending) => descending ? query.OrderByDescending(keySelector) : query.OrderBy(keySelector);
}

public static class QueryHelper
{
    public static Expression<Func<T, object>> GetDefaultSortExpression<T>(SortableEntity sortableEntity)
    {
        Type entityType = typeof(T);
        ParameterExpression arg = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "x");

        string[] fieldNames = sortableEntity.Name.Split('.');
        MemberExpression memberExpression = null;
        foreach (string name in fieldNames)
        {
            Expression expressionToUse = memberExpression ?? (Expression) arg;
            memberExpression = Expression.Property(expressionToUse, name.ToProperCase());
        }

        Expression propertyExpression = Expression.Convert(memberExpression, typeof(object));
        Expression<Func<T, object>>
            complexExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, object>>(propertyExpression, arg);
        return complexExpression;
    }
}

public class SortableEntity
{
    public int Order { get; set; }
    public bool Descending { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Sorting
{
    IEnumerable<SortableEntity> SortableEntities { get; }
}

public class TestDecimalPropertyClass : Entity
{
    public TestDecimalPropertyClass(decimal @decimal) => Decimal = @decimal;

    protected TestDecimalPropertyClass()
    {
    }

    public decimal Decimal { get; set; }
}

public class TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository
{
    private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

    public TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }

    public async Task<IEnumerable<TestDecimalPropertyClass>> GetAllAsync(Sorting sorting)
    {
        List<TestDecimalPropertyClass> entities = await _dbContext.Set<TestDecimalPropertyClass>()
            .SortBy(sorting)
            .ToListAsync();

        return entities;
    }

    public async Task SaveAsync(TestDecimalPropertyClass testDecimalPropertyClass)
    {
        _dbContext.Set<TestDecimalPropertyClass>().Add(testDecimalPropertyClass);
        await _dbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
    }
}

Here is a test I wrote for it:

[TestFixture]
public class GenericSortingTests
{
    private SqliteConnection SqliteConnection { get; set; }

    [SetUp]
    public void DbSetup()
    {
        SqliteConnectionStringBuilder sqliteConnectionStringBuilder = new SqliteConnectionStringBuilder
        {
            Mode = SqliteOpenMode.Memory,
            Cache = SqliteCacheMode.Private
        };
        SqliteConnection = new SqliteConnection(sqliteConnectionStringBuilder.ToString());
        SqliteConnection.Open();
    }

    [TearDown]
    public void DbTearDown()
    {
        SqliteConnection.Close();
    }
    [Test]
    public async Task GivenADecimalProperty_WhenISortByColumn_ThenItSorts()
    {
        decimal[] decimals = new[] {7m, 84.3m, 13.4m};

        using (DbContext dbContext = GetDbContext())
        {
            TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository testRepository = new TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository(dbContext);

            foreach (decimal @decimal in decimals)
            {
                TestDecimalPropertyClass entity = new TestDecimalPropertyClass(@decimal);
                await testRepository.SaveAsync(entity);
            }
        }

        IEnumerable<TestDecimalPropertyClass> entities;
        using (DbContext dbContext = GetDbContext())
        {
            TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository testRepository = new TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository(dbContext);

            entities = await testRepository.GetAllAsync(new Sorting
            {
                SortableEntities = new[]
                {
                    new SortableEntity
                    {
                        Descending = false,
                        Name = "decimal",
                        Order = 0
                    }
                }
            });
        }

        List<TestDecimalPropertyClass> list = entities.ToList();
        Assert.That(list.Count(), Is.EqualTo(decimals.Length));
        Assert.That(list.ToArray()[0].Decimal, Is.EqualTo(7m));
        Assert.That(list.ToArray()[1].Decimal, Is.EqualTo(13.4m));
        Assert.That(list.ToArray()[2].Decimal, Is.EqualTo(84.3m));
    }

    private class TestDbContext : DbContext
    {
        public TestDbContext(DbContextOptions options) : base(options)
        {
        }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            modelBuilder.Entity<TestDecimalPropertyClass>();
            base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        }
    }

    private DbContext GetDbContext()
    {
        DbContextOptions<TestDbContext> options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<TestDbContext>()
            .UseSqlite(SqliteConnection)
            .EnableSensitiveDataLogging()
            .Options;

        TestDbContext dbContext = new TestDbContext(options);
        dbContext.Database.EnsureCreated();
        return dbContext;
    }
}

I expect it to sort the items into the order: 7m, 13.4m, 84.3m but instead it sorts it into 13.4m, 7m, 84.3m

Can anyone help me understand why its doing this so I can fix it?

Thanks, Chris

  • The fact that it's coming out in the same order as it went in suggests that no sorting is happening. – Bijan Rafraf Nov 9 '17 at 10:45
  • I've just re-ordered the decimal array to {7m, 84.3m, 13.4m} and its coming out with {13.4m, 7m, 84.3m} still – chris31389 Nov 9 '17 at 10:48
  • and it works fine for types other than decimal? – Bijan Rafraf Nov 9 '17 at 10:58
  • 1
    There's a lot of code here. Could you make an example with the minimum code that reproduces your problem? stackoverflow.com/help/mcve – Dan Dumitru Nov 9 '17 at 11:09
  • 1
    It's a good thing to include all the code to reproduce the problem, but if you try to start from scratch and include small bits of code one at a time I suspect you'll get to less code to reproduce the problem and maybe you'll realize where the issue is yourself. – Dan Dumitru Nov 9 '17 at 11:26
4

First off, I've previously tried to re-invent the wheel like this myself, and it never ever really works as well as you'd like. If you need that sort of dynamic flexiblity, then either there is probably already a library somewhere, or you may as well drop to actually manually crafting SQL or something (it sucks, but sometimes it's the only pragmatic approach).. That aside...

I think your problem is actually related to SQLite - I couldn't get the SQLite stuff to work due to either typos or versions not being the same (e.g. The default nuget packages for SQLite have a SQLiteConnectionStringBuilder and NOT a SqliteConnectionStringBuilder, and this doesn't appear to have the same properties as your example) so I hacked your code somewhat to remove the SQL stuff and get rid of Async things (as I would hope that that's not relevant really), so I have this repository instead:

public class TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository
{
    private readonly IList<TestDecimalPropertyClass> list;

    public TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository(IEnumerable<TestDecimalPropertyClass> repo)
    {
        list = repo.ToList();
    }

    public IEnumerable<TestDecimalPropertyClass> GetAll(Sorting sorting)
    {
        List<TestDecimalPropertyClass> entities = list
            .AsQueryable()
            .SortBy(sorting)
            .ToList();

        return entities;
    }

    public void Save(TestDecimalPropertyClass testDecimalPropertyClass)
    {
        list.Add(testDecimalPropertyClass);            

    }
}

Which makes the test look like this

[Test]
public void GivenADecimalProperty_WhenISortByColumn_ThenItSorts()
{
    decimal[] decimals = new[] { 7m, 84.3m, 13.4m };
    var repo = decimals.Select(x => new TestDecimalPropertyClass(x));

    TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository testRepository = new TestDecimalPropertyClassRepository(repo);

    var entities = testRepository.GetAll(new Sorting
    {
        SortableEntities = new[]
            {
            new SortableEntity
            {
                Descending = false,
                Name = "decimal",
                Order = 0
            }
        }
    });

    List<TestDecimalPropertyClass> list = entities.ToList();
    Assert.That(list.Count(), Is.EqualTo(decimals.Length));
    Assert.That(list.ToArray()[0].Decimal, Is.EqualTo(7m));
    Assert.That(list.ToArray()[1].Decimal, Is.EqualTo(13.4m));
    Assert.That(list.ToArray()[2].Decimal, Is.EqualTo(84.3m));
}

And left all your extension stuff the same, so it's still reflecting around etc. in the same way.

This test passes fine. Now, this isn't really entirely valid as it's no longer quite the same of course, but it does to my mind mean it's probably not the framework mis-interpreting the type of the decimal property, or some sort of confusion related to boxing/unboxing meaning it can't work out the type and does a .ToString() for comparison.

Assuming the SQLite EF provider is correctly translating this into a SQL ORDER BY clause, have you checked this SQL? In the past I've done similar (used SQLite to write tests) and found it's not quite as complete in some obscure ways as SQL Server or similar. Perhaps the provider has a bug, or there's a quirk in the generated expression tree that it can't quite understand well enough.

So I'd look into that first rather than the code you've written..

| improve this answer | |
  • After your reply, I went back and wrote a unit test to do a simple OrderBy(x => x.Decimal) and it showed that the issue was the framework. Thanks for your help – chris31389 Nov 9 '17 at 12:32
  • No Problem - I'd also advise just trying it on SQL Server (assuming that's the actual end use case) just to see; it might work fine there (as I hinted at above, that's the sort of thing I've seen in the past). SQLite in-memory is OK for testing basic repository operations, but last time I did things like this I actually ended up using LocalDB for the tests IIRC. Bit of a pain as it was having to create a physical DB file which dramatically slowed them down, but I think I just wrote some custom "Empty the DB" code to run in SetUp() or something. Still not 100% sure it's worth the hassle :) – GPW Nov 9 '17 at 12:37
  • Here is the issue which points out the reason why the ordering was different in SQLite. github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/10249 – Smit Nov 10 '17 at 22:17

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