I have data in the following format:

"22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g"

What I would like to do is to split it into a list such that value and units are grouped together, e.g.:

["22.926 g","47.377 g","73.510 g","131.567 g","322.744 g"]

Of course, in Python 2.7, I can do this the hard way:

result = []
tokens = "22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g".split()
for index,item in enumerate(tokens[::2]):
    result.append(item+" "+tokens[index+1])

but I hoped that there is a slightly more elegant way for doing this?

  • Regular Expressions would be a neater way. I'll see if I can get something working and if so post it as an answer – scotty3785 Nov 9 '17 at 13:13
  • Will the units always be 'g', or will you need to deal with other unit strings? – PM 2Ring Nov 9 '17 at 13:22
  • Ideally, other units should be supported, but they will always be in the form with a g at the end, e.g. mg or kg. – Andreas Held Nov 9 '17 at 13:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted
a = "22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g".split()
c = [" ".join((v, g)) for v,g in zip(a[:-1:2], a[1::2])]
  • 1
    that doesn't give the expected result: ['22.926 g', 'g 47.377', '47.377 g', 'g 73.510', '73.510 g', 'g 131.567', '131.567 g', 'g 322.744', '322.744 g'] – Jean-François Fabre Nov 9 '17 at 13:21
  • Thanks, I forgot about the step. Updated – Alexey Nov 9 '17 at 13:24
  • Thanks, this is what I was looking for, very nice! – Andreas Held Nov 9 '17 at 13:27

With regex (and the re.findall method)you could obtain what you need :

import re
text="22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g"
re.findall("\d+\.\d+ g", text)
>>>['22.926 g', '47.377 g', '73.510 g', '131.567 g', '322.744 g']

But keep in mind that when solving a problem with regex we often end with 2 problems ;)

  • I was far too slow to post my answer! – scotty3785 Nov 9 '17 at 13:19

what about splitting according to " g" and strip/filter out empty fields, re-add the g suffix afterwards, in one line:

["{} g".format(x.strip()) for x in "22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g".split(" g") if x]

result:

['22.926 g', '47.377 g', '73.510 g', '131.567 g', '322.744 g']

In one-line! Split the string, and use list comprehension to get the desired output by removing all g and appending g!

s="22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g"
>>> [x+' g' for x in s.split() if x!='g']

Output

['22.926 g', '47.377 g', '73.510 g', '131.567 g', '322.744 g']
data = "22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g"
sep = 'g'
result = ['{digit} {sep}'.format(digit=d.strip(), sep=sep) for d in data[:-1].split(sep)]

Not very elegant, but how about:

s = "22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g"
l = s.strip('g').split('g')
l = [item + 'g' for item in l]

I don't think there is something wrong with your solution, but the usual approach would probably consists of a regular expression

import re

input = "22.926 g 47.377 g 73.510 g 131.567 g 322.744 g"
result = p.findall(r'(\d+\.\d+ g)', input)
print(result)

prints

['22.926 g', '47.377 g', '73.510 g', '131.567 g', '322.744 g']
  • 1
    this solution is already posted – Ev. Kounis Nov 9 '17 at 13:19
  • Yeah, just noticed. I will leave it because mine includes a link to a tutorial, just in case OP doesn't know what regular expressions are. – Arne Nov 9 '17 at 13:21

I don't know if this is the most beautiful way but it's a one-line solution:

[s.lstrip() + "g" for s in text.split("g") if s]
  • what are tokens here? – Van Peer Nov 9 '17 at 13:43
  • @VanPeer I changed tokens by text, so it's clearer. Thanks. – dcg Nov 13 '17 at 21:54

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