Not sure if what I want is possible but I am trying to create an enum in which each member has its own inner class. These inner classes will all have the same name Context but will be implemented individually.

Ideally I would like them to be usable as such:

private handleType (MyEnum type) {
    switch (type) {

        case ENUM_VAL1:
            MyEnum.ENUM_VAL1.Context context = new MyEnum.ENUM_VAL1.Context();
            handleContext1(context);
            break;

        case ENUM_VAL2:
            MyEnum.ENUM_VAL2.Context context = new MyEnum.ENUM_VAL1.Context();
            handleContext2(context);
            break;

        case ENUM_VAL3:
            MyEnum.ENUM_VAL3.Context context = new MyEnum.ENUM_VAL1.Context();
            handleContext3(context);
            break;

        default:
            break;
}

Open to other way of implementing this. But basically I need a switchable enum where each member has a "value" (1,2,3...) and also a means of associating said enums with a unique class with constructor.

EDIT: Some background. This is to be used between two services who communicate via JSON http requests. The requests will contain some metadata, one field of which is an integer that maps to the enum. The context is a POJO, but is different for each ENUM_VALUE. Essentially, the context will be constructed and serialized into JSON. This json will effectively be just a String field called context within the top level json request. On the receiving service, there will be a switch on ENUM_VALUE, where the context is decoded appropriately and then dispatched to its appropriate handler.

EDIT2: This enum will be shared between the two services.

EDIT3: Here is a more explicit explanation of what I am attempting to do.

MyServiceRequest:

public class MyServiceRequest {
    String meta1;
    String meta2;
    int typeID;
    String context;
}

generating request:

MyServiceRequest req = new MyServiceRequest();
req.meta1 = ...
req.meta2 = ...
req.typeID = MyEnum.ENUM_VALUE.getCode(); // int

MyEnum.ENUM_VALUE.Context context = new MyEnum.ENUM_VALUE.Context(); // factory would be fine as well
... // populate context
req.context = toJSON(context);
requestJSON = toJSON(req);
post(requestJSON);

decoding request:

MyServiceRequest req = ...
MyEnum type = new MyEnum(req.typeID);
switch(type) {
    case ENUM_VALUE:
        MyEnum.ENUM_VALUE.Context context = fromJSON(req.context, MyEnum.ENUM_VALUE.Context.class);
        doSomething(context);
  • 2
    Sounds like a bad design IMO to have one method per different implementation of Context. I'd make Context an interface or abstract class and would let every subclass implementing it add concrete behavior (aka polymorphism). Then, you'd only need one handleContext method. – Federico Peralta Schaffner Nov 9 '17 at 19:37
  • @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner some background added in an edit. – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 19:44
  • 1
    Your edits aren't helping me understand why you are pursuing the design you describe, or what advantage you anticipate getting from the enum, much less the inner classes. It all seems way over-complicated. Why not skip the enum and just have a separate class for each request type? – John Bollinger Nov 9 '17 at 20:27
  • honestly I just come from dynamic language world where things like this are trivial. how would you go about having a different class for each request be received at a single endpoint when the type of the context object can vary? – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 20:35
  • at some point I need to map classes to the TypeID – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 20:36
up vote 9 down vote accepted

One think you could do instead is have your enum implement Supplier<Context>. Now each item would have to declare a get() method to create the individual Context sub type.

enum MyEnum implements Supplier<Context>{
   FOO{ @Override public Context get(){ return new FooContext(); } },
   BAR{ @Override public Context get(){ return new BarContext(); } }
}

which would make your client code much simpler:

private void handleType (MyEnum type) {
    handleContext(type.get());
}
  • interesting. I do still need type to have a corresponding integer value as well though. – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 19:38
  • 1
    @thedarklord47 In that case, you could have an abstract method in Context that returns that integer value, and each subclass would return a different value. – Federico Peralta Schaffner Nov 9 '17 at 19:41
  • 1
    @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner exactly. That's pretty much the Abstract Factory Pattern right there – Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 9 '17 at 19:44
  • @SeanPatrickFloyd Yes, and it makes sense, since Supplier<T> is actually a factory of T instances. – Federico Peralta Schaffner Nov 9 '17 at 19:46

Why use an inner class?

You could simply have a field context that gets initialized with different values for each enum constant. Like:

public enum Whatever {
  A(new AContext), B... 

  private final Context context;

  private Whatever(Context context) {
    this.context = context;
 .... 
  • the contexts are complex objects themselves. basically I need a way of associating these context objects (ant their different implementations) with an enum – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 19:41
  • So have the enum class own a Context object. There is nothing to gain from introducing sub classes here. – GhostCat Nov 9 '17 at 20:04
  • what is AContext in your answer? – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 20:09
  • A specific sub class of Context. Or maybe it is not AContext, but Context(A). Meaning :it is nothing but a placeholder to indicate one way to solve this. The point is that you don't need sub classes within your enum! – GhostCat Nov 9 '17 at 21:41

I wouldn't recommend a separate inner class for every enum, just a separate implementation. Something like below would probably be your best approach, then you don't have to use a switch statment. Because you can just call getContext() on your type variable:

enum MyEnum{

    A(new Context(){
        // my implementation
    }),
    B(new Context(){
        // my other implementation
    }),
    ;

    private final Context context;

    MyEnum(Context context){
        this.context = context;
    }

    public Context getContext(){
        return context;
    }

    public interface Context{
        // do something
    }
}
  • 1
    This implementation makes sense if the Contexts are immutable. – Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 9 '17 at 19:32
  • 1
    @SeanPatrickFloyd as Enums are static I'm assuming that the Context should not change during runtime – Lino Nov 9 '17 at 19:33
  • The Context classes should be static. I will need to create and modify the Context objects. This modification will occur in handleContextX() – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 19:40
  • @Lino I was agreeing with you, but emphasizing this for future readers – Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 9 '17 at 19:45

The most significant problem with what you describe is that classes scoped to individual enum elements do not have names that are resolvable outside that element. That makes it impossible to instantiate such a class via the new operator outside the enum value, or to declare any method outside the enum value that has that class as argument or return type.

But you can largely work around that by declaring an interface type for the inner classes to implement, and providing a factory method to serve in place of a constructor for obtaining instances. For example:

enum MyEnum {
    ENUM_VAL1 {
        class Context implements MyEnum.Context {
            public void doSomething() {
                System.out.println(1);
            }
        }

        public MyEnum.Context createContext() {
            return new Context();
        }
    },
    ENUM_VAL2 {
        class Context implements MyEnum.Context {
            public void doSomething() {
                System.out.println(2);
            }
        }

        public MyEnum.Context createContext() {
            return new Context();
        }
    };

    interface Context {
        public void doSomething();
    }

    public abstract Context createContext();
}

public class EnumScope {

    private void handleContext1(MyEnum.Context context) {
        context.doSomething();
    }

    private void handleContext2(MyEnum.Context context) {
        context.doSomething();
    }

    private void handleType(MyEnum type) {
        MyEnum.Context context = type.createContext();

        switch (type) {
            case ENUM_VAL1:
                handleContext1(context);
                break;
            case ENUM_VAL2:
                handleContext2(context);
                break;
        }
    }
}

I think this is a bit dubious, however -- especially having methods specific to particular enum values that do not actually belong to those enum values. There is likely an altogether different approach that would serve you better, but you have described the problem too generically for us to suggest such an alternative.


Update

After considering your edits to the question and your subsequent comments, I am inclined to stick with my assessment that what you're proposing is a bit dubious.

Take a step back and consider the problem from a wider perspective. You are generating, serializing (to JSON), deserializing, and consuming requests of several types (distinguished, at present, by an ID code that appears within). It makes sense to represent each type of request with a class bearing the appropriate properties, including those of the varying context data of each type. If there are some intentional commonalities, then perhaps these should implement a common interface that describes them, or even extend a common base class.

With that done, the JSON serialization / deserialization is a solved (more than once) problem. Unless you like reinventing the wheel, I'm inclined to suggest Google GSON for this. I need to qualify that with an admission that I haven't much personal experience with GSON, but it's quite popular, and you'll see a lot of questions (and answers) about it here. You'll also find some good online tutorials.

  • why bother declaring the class for each enum? just use an anonymous class which shortens the code and literally does the same – Lino Nov 9 '17 at 19:57
  • 1
    That's a good observation, @Lino. In what I have presented here, there is no particular advantage to using named inner classes. In principle, however, such classes could be used as a variable, argument, or return types inside their enum elements (which requires named classes). Thus, I'm demonstrating that you can indeed declare named inner classes inside enum elements. – John Bollinger Nov 9 '17 at 20:02
  • It does make sense when looking at it from that angle :) – Lino Nov 9 '17 at 20:03
  • I have added some additional explanation in a 3rd edit. Do you see any obvious alternatives? I'd rather not write dubious code haha – thedarklord47 Nov 9 '17 at 20:11
  • @thedarklord47, I have updated my answer to suggest a (quite different) alternative approach. – John Bollinger Nov 9 '17 at 22:49

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