61

It is possible to put more than 1000 items in the SQL IN clause? We have been getting issues with our Oracle database not being able to handle it.

IF yes, how do we put more than 1000 items in the SQL IN clause?

IF not, what else can I do?

3

5 Answers 5

97

There's another workaround for this that isn't mentioned in any of the other answers (or other answered questions):

Any in statement like x in (1,2,3) can be rewritten as (1,x) in ((1,1), (1,2), (1,3)) and the 1000 element limit will no longer apply. I've tested with an index on x and explain plan still reports that Oracle is using an access predicate and range scan.

6
  • 1
    +1 cool trick :) - tested with 10,001 elements - performance seems to suffer though Feb 1, 2012 at 4:08
  • 3
    @Nitish my guess is that support for tuples came later and by then the developers were enlightened with the ZOI principle
    – gordy
    Nov 7, 2014 at 19:41
  • Anyone know how this can be implemented using JPA Query Language? Dec 4, 2014 at 14:13
  • 2
    @JeffreyKemp Oracle seems to limit to 70,000 in a tuple style in clause, still better than the regular in clause limitation.
    – Y123
    Jan 9, 2017 at 0:01
  • Maybe you mean 65535, @JeffreyKemp. asktom.oracle.com/pls/apex/…, last comment. "I tested and the limit for in-list of tuples is 65,535 - as you seem to suggest with your example. Same Oracle version as yours, 12.2.0.1..... Just making atomic elements into 1-tuples by wrapping them in parentheses doesn't work though; the tuples must be n-tuples with n >= 2. ....And Oracle has a hard limit of 2^16 - 1 = 65,535 component conditions for such compound conditions - regardless of what those conditions are"
    – WesternGun
    Nov 4, 2021 at 8:09
64

You should transform the IN clauses to INNER JOIN clauses.

You can transform a query like this one

SELECT  foo   
FROM    bar   
WHERE bar.stuff IN  
       (SELECT  stuff FROM asdf)

in a query like this other one.

SELECT  b.foo 
FROM    ( 
        SELECT  DISTINCT stuff 
        FROM    asdf ) a 
JOIN    bar b 
ON      b.stuff = a.stuff

You will also gain a lot of performance

0
11

We can have more than one "IN" statement for the same variable.

For ex:

select val
 from table
where val in (1,2,3,...)
or
val in (7,8,9,....)
0

If you don't have the luxury of creating a temp table, you can simulate it using the WITH clause

with t as (
  select 1 val from dual 
  union all select 2 from dual
  union all select 3 from dual
    ...
  union all select 5001 from dual
  union all select 5002 from dual
)
select * 
  from mytable
 where col1 in (select val from t)

Obviously, you could also join mytable to t

I like Gordy's answer best, just showing another way.

-1

Another way:

SELECT COL1, COL2, COL3 FROM YOUR_TABLE
WHERE 1=1
AND COL2 IN (
SELECT VAL1 as FAKE FROM DUAL
UNION
SELECT VAL2 as FAKE FROM DUAL
UNION
SELECT VAL3 as FAKE FROM DUAL
--...
)
6
  • You should use UNION ALL instead of UNION and VALUES constructor instead of both of them.
    – Hogan
    Oct 5, 2016 at 16:39
  • This answer is quite old -- use the VALUES table constructor instead
    – Hogan
    Mar 3, 2021 at 14:28
  • @Hogan Oracle didn't list values as table constructor until 21c. Can you please share the link to the documentation?
    – astentx
    Nov 3, 2021 at 19:20
  • @astentx -- you have to use UNION ALL in oracle
    – Hogan
    Nov 14, 2021 at 15:18
  • @hogan Yes, this answer is about this, but your comment suggested to use values 5 years ago and half a year ago again.
    – astentx
    Nov 14, 2021 at 16:51

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