I have a given dataframe and I would like for each line to be able to select the values that are above the line's given percentile.

Let's consider this dataframe:

df = pd.DataFrame({'A' : [5,6,3,4, 0,5,9], 'B' : [1,2,3, 5,7,0,1]})

   A  B
0  5  1
1  6  2
2  3  3
3  4  5
4  0  7
5  5  0
6  9  1

And a given vector of the 20th quantiles for each row:

rowsQuantiles = df.quantile(0.2, axis=1)

0    1.8
1    2.8
2    3.0
3    4.2
4    1.4
5    1.0
6    2.6

I would like to be able to filter-out for each row the values that are below the row's quantile in to have the following result:

quantileMask = df > rowsQuantiles

   A      B
0  True   False
1  True   False
2  False  False
3  False  True  
4  False  True  
5  True   False
6  True   False

EDIT:

I really liked both approaches by @andrew_reece and @Andy Hayden, so I decided to see which one was the fastet/best-implemented:

N=10000000
df = pd.DataFrame({'A' : [random.random() for i in range(N)], 'B' : [random.random() for i in range(N)]})
rowsQuantiles = df.quantile(0.2, axis=1)

t0=time.time()

mask=(df.T>rowsQuantiles).T
#mask=df.apply(lambda row: row > rowsQuantiles)

print(str(time.time()-t0))

Results are pretty straightforward (after several repeted tests):

  • 220ms for mask=(df.T>rowsQuantiles).T
  • 65ms for mask=df.apply(lambda row: row > rowsQuantiles)
  • 21ms for df.gt(rowsQuantiles,0), the accepted answer.
  • 2
    No chance, these are rubbish timings. See my answer, I've timed them properly with timeit, using your data. – coldspeed Nov 10 '17 at 21:31
  • All I can see in your answer is in accordance with what I posted, right? – ylnor Nov 10 '17 at 21:34
  • You claimed the answer you accepted is the fastest. And I'm saying it's not. What's more, you downvoted perfectly good answers for whatever reason. – coldspeed Nov 10 '17 at 21:35
  • 1
    Didn't notice the gt approach first, it's corrected now, apologies. Besides that I was right in the fact that àpply is faster than the double transpose, that's why I meant your post was in accordance with mine. Not gonna play the argue/downvote game with you though – ylnor Nov 10 '17 at 21:44
  • No problem, it's much easier to return the downvote and move on :) – coldspeed Nov 10 '17 at 21:45
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Also only using gt

df.gt(rowsQuantiles,0)
Out[288]: 
       A      B
0   True  False
1   True  False
2  False  False
3  False   True
4  False   True
5   True  False
6   True  False

Using add

df.add(-rowsQuantiles,0).gt(0)
Out[284]: 
       A      B
0   True  False
1   True  False
2  False  False
3  False   True
4  False   True
5   True  False
6   True  False
  • Interesting solution! – coldspeed Nov 10 '17 at 20:36
  • this is very neat – Andy Hayden Nov 10 '17 at 21:22
  • any explanation for downvote ? – Wen Nov 10 '17 at 21:28
  • @Wen OP downvoted our answers, for whatever reason. – coldspeed Nov 10 '17 at 21:34
  • @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ that is fine , we can not expect more .;-) – Wen Nov 10 '17 at 21:36

There's a transpose error with your mask, but assuming you want to replace the values with NaN, the method you're looking for is where:

In [11]: df.T > rowsQuantiles
Out[11]:
       0      1      2      3      4      5      6
A   True   True  False  False  False   True   True
B  False  False  False   True   True  False  False

In [12]: (df.T > rowsQuantiles).T
Out[12]:
       A      B
0   True  False
1   True  False
2  False  False
3  False   True
4  False   True
5   True  False
6   True  False

In [13]: df.where((df.T > rowsQuantiles).T)
Out[13]:
     A    B
0  5.0  NaN
1  6.0  NaN
2  NaN  NaN
3  NaN  5.0
4  NaN  7.0
5  5.0  NaN
6  9.0  NaN
  • 1
    Yeah, I knew the obvious solution was this simple, but was a bit slow to the punch this time. – coldspeed Nov 10 '17 at 20:30
  • 2
    @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ I was a little surprised df > rowsQuantiles wasn't just working! – Andy Hayden Nov 10 '17 at 20:31
  • Just using gt , will work ...see my answer...:-) – Wen Nov 10 '17 at 20:38
df.apply(lambda row: row > rowsQuantiles)

       A      B
0   True  False
1   True  False
2  False  False
3  False   True
4  False   True
5   True  False
6   True  False
  • Really elegant, and also the fastest, thanks! – ylnor Nov 10 '17 at 21:26
  • 1
    Thanks! But it looks like Wen's answer is much speedier - see the timing section in cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ's answer. – andrew_reece Nov 10 '17 at 21:41

An alternative I could get behind is np.where:

np.where(df.values > rowsQuantiles[:, None], True, False)

array([[ True, False],
       [ True, False],
       [False, False],
       [False,  True],
       [False,  True],
       [ True, False],
       [ True, False]], dtype=bool)

Which returns a numpy array, if you're okay with that.


Timings

%timeit df.T > rowsQuantiles
1 loop, best of 3: 251 ms per loop

%timeit df.where((df.T > rowsQuantiles).T)
1 loop, best of 3: 583 ms per loop

%timeit np.where(df.values > rowsQuantiles[:, None], True, False)
10 loops, best of 3: 136 ms per loop

%timeit df.add(-rowsQuantiles,0).gt(0)
10 loops, best of 3: 141 ms per loop

%timeit df.gt(rowsQuantiles,0)
10 loops, best of 3: 25.4 ms per loop

%timeit df.apply(lambda row: row > rowsQuantiles)
10 loops, best of 3: 60.6 ms per loop

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