I have following query in Perl regarding the accessing of file handlers.

Consider the following code snippet which describes the exact scenario.

Main.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use warnings;
use strict;
use strict 'refs';

use File::Basename;
use Fcntl ':flock';

use feature qw/say switch/;

use File::Spec::Functions;
use File::Find;

require( "/home/rxa3kor/Mastering_Perl/sample.pm" );

our $LOGFILE = "sample";
open( LOGFILE, ">$LOGFILE" ) or die "__ERROR: can't open file\n'", $LOGFILE, "'!\n";
flock( LOGFILE, LOCK_EX );
print LOGFILE ( "Tool Start\n" );

&sample::func();

flock( LOGFILE, LOCK_UN );
close( LOGFILE );

sample.pm

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
package sample;

sub func() {
    print $main::LOGFILE ( "Printing in subroutine\n" );
}

when I execute the above said code snippet I am getting the following error.

print() on unopened filehandle Mastering at /home/rxa3kor/Mastering_Perl/sample.pm line 6.

Th error is because the filehandle LOGFILE is not visible under sample.pm module.

How this concept can be implemented?

I want to open a file in Main.pl and I need this file handle to be accessible in different Perl modules.

  • 3
    I don't think this is the code you are using. This code doesn't compile. You are missing a semicolon at the end of the use File::Find line. And once I fix that, I get another problem as you are not loading sample.pm in your main program. Please don't waste our time by posting sample code where we have to fix simple errors like that. – Dave Cross Nov 11 '17 at 6:54
  • 1
    Two more errors. sample.pm does not return a true value. And the filename is different between this sample code and the error message that you quote. – Dave Cross Nov 11 '17 at 6:55
  • Basically i wanted to know whether we can open a file under main.pl and i need this file handle to be accessible in different Perl modules. – Rotch Miller Nov 11 '17 at 7:01
  • 1
    This is unrelated to the problem that you are asking about, but what do you think will happen when you open your logfile in '>' mode, and then discover you're unable to obtain an exclusive lock because someone else has it locked? – DavidO Nov 11 '17 at 7:11
  • 1
    Hint: Clobber-output mode will clobber the output file before you've obtained a lock. This means if someone else already had the file opened with a lock, you just clobbered them. – DavidO Nov 11 '17 at 7:13

You've got an extremely detailed analysis from Dave Cross.

Here I'd like to offer a way to cleanly provide a log file for all modules to write to.

Introduce a module that performs the writes to a log file in a sub; load it by all modules that need that. In that sub open the log file to append, using state filehandle which thus stays open across the calls. Then the modules write by invoking this sub, and this can be initiated by a call from main.

The logger module

package LogAll;

use warnings;
use strict;
use feature qw(say state);
use Carp qw(croak);    
use Exporter qw(import);

our @EXPORT_OK = qw(write_log);

sub write_log {
    state $fh = do {               # initialize; stays open across calls
        my $log = 'LOG_FILE.txt';
        open my $afh, '>>', $log or croak "Can't open $log: $!";
        $afh;
    };  
    say $fh $_ for @_;
}
1;

Two other modules, that need to log, are virtually the same for this example; here is one

package Mod1;

use warnings;
use strict;

use Exporter qw(import);    
use LogAll qw(write_log);

our @EXPORT_OK = qw(f1);

sub f1 {
    write_log(__PACKAGE__ . ": @_");
}
1;

The main

use warnings;
use strict;

use LogAll qw(write_log);    
use Mod1 qw(f1);
use Mod2 qw(f2);

write_log('START');

f1("hi from " . __PACKAGE__);
f2("another " . __PACKAGE__);

A run results in the file LOG_FILE.txt

START
Mod1: hi from main
Mod2: another main

I print START for a demo but the file need not be opened from main.

Please develop the printer module further as suitable. For example, and a way for the file name to be passed optionally so that main can name the log (by varying type and number of arguments), and add a way to close the log controllably,

The reason why you're seeing this error is that $main::LOGFILE refers to the scalar variable $LOGFILE which contains the filename, sample. The filehandle, LOGFILE, is a completely different variable. And here we see the dangers of having two variables of different types (scalar vs filehandle) with the same name.

Bareword filehandles (the ones in capital letters with no sigil attached, the type you are using) are slightly strange variables. They don't need a sigil, so you shouldn't use one. So the simplest fix is to just remove the $.

sub func()
{
  print main::LOGFILE ("Printing in subroutine\n");
}

But using global variables like this is a terrible idea. It will quickly lead to your code turning into an unmaintainable mess.

Far better to use a lexical filehandle and to pass that into your subroutine.

our $LOGFILE="sample";
open( my $log_fh, ">$LOGFILE" ) or die "__ERROR: can't open file\n'",$LOGFILE,"'!\n";
flock( $log_fh, LOCK_EX );
print $log_fh ("Tool Start\n");
&sample::func($log_fh);
flock( $log_fh, LOCK_UN );
close( $log_fh );

And in sample.pm:

sub func
{
  my ($fh) = @_;
  print $fh ("Printing in subroutine\n");
}

Note that as I'm now passing a parameter to func(). I've removed the prototype saying that it takes no parameters (although the fact that you were calling it with & turns off parameter checking!)

A few other points.

  • You don't need both -w and use warnings. Remove the -w.
  • You don't need both use strict and use strict 'refs'. Remove the latter.
  • Modules with all lower-case names are reserved for special Perl features called pragmas. Don't name your modules like that.
  • There's no need for $LOGFILE to be a package variable (defined with our). Just make it a lexical (defined with my).
  • There is no reason to call subroutines with & (and, in fact, it has a couple of downsides that will confuse you).
  • Don't define subroutines with prototypes unless you know what they are for.
  • No need for a shebang line in modules.
  • Use strict and warnings in modules.

I'd write your code like this:

# main.pl
use warnings;
use strict;

use File::Basename; # Not used. Remove?
use Fcntl ':flock'; # Not used. Remove?
use feature qw/say switch/;
use File::Spec::Functions; # Not used. Remove?
use File::Find; # Not used. Remove?
use Sample;

my $LOGFILE = 'sample';
# Lexical filehandle. Three-arg version of open()
open( my $log_fh, '>', $LOGFILE )
  or die "__ERROR: can't open file\n'$LOGFILE'!\n";
flock( $log_fh, LOCK_EX );

print $log_fh ("Tool Start\n");
Sample::func($log_fh);

flock( $log_fh, LOCK_UN );
close( $log_fh );

And...

package Sample;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub func {
  my ($fh) = @_;
  print $fh ("Printing in subroutine\n");
}

1;
  • Is there any method where we can avoid passing the file handler to a subroutine ? I need to directly access the file handler in the perl module which is present in main,pl. Reason for this requirement is because i may have different Perl modules and different subroutines inside each modules, every time i need to pass the file handlers to each of these subroutines in Perl module. Another difficulty will be always subroutine need not be called from main.pl file, subroutine defined in a *.pm file may call other subroutine which is defined in another *.pm module. – Rotch Miller Nov 11 '17 at 7:29
  • @RotchMiller: My answer already tells you how to do that. But I think it's a very bad idea. – Dave Cross Nov 11 '17 at 7:32
  • Main underlying problem is the way how the file handler's can be made visible in the subroutine of different Perl modules. Like how we have to export a scalar variables from one *.pm module to any perl modules using the EXPORTER, similar concept for file handlers would be good. – Rotch Miller Nov 11 '17 at 7:54
  • @RotchMiller: Exporter works fine for filehandles. Obviously not if they're lexical variables. But for package variables and bareword filehandles, there's no problem. – Dave Cross Nov 11 '17 at 7:59
  • 1
    @RotchMiller The traditional way to make a variable visible within subroutines in many different modules is to pass it in as a parameter. But if you want to ignore seventy years of good software engineering practice - feel free :-) – Dave Cross Nov 11 '17 at 8:03

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