I'm new to Python and trying to use class inheritance, and haven't been able to wrap my head around sharing variables. I have two classes so far, Scan and Ping:

scan.py

class Scan(object):
    """ Super class for scans """
    identifier = str(random.getrandbits(128))
    timestamp = int(time.time())
    results_dir = "/tmp/{}/".format(identifier)
    total_hosts = 0

    def __init__(self, target_hosts=None, target_ports=None):
        self.__target_hosts = target_hosts
        self.__target_ports = target_ports
        self.scan_string = "-sT -O --script auth,vuln"

    @property
    def target_hosts(self):
        return self.__target_hosts

    @target_hosts.setter
    def target_hosts(self, hosts):
        """ Sets target hosts for scan """
        """ Nmap Expects to be single-spaced '1 2 3' separated """
        self.__target_hosts = hosts.replace(", ", " ")

ping.py

import nmap
from .scan import Scan

class Ping(Scan):
    """ Ping sweep """

    def __init__(self, ping_string, hosts):
        super(Scan, self).__init__()
        self.ping_string = ping_string
        self.hosts = hosts

In my script that pretty much calls everything, I'm attempting:

from models.scan import Scan
from models.ping import Ping

s = Scan()
hosts = "192.168.0.0/24"
s.target_hosts = hosts
pinger = Ping(ping_string, s.target_hosts)

This line doesn't make sense to me ... if Ping inherits from Scan, why does this only work when I call s.targets_hosts ? Shouldn't I be able to call target_hosts from my Ping class like Ping.target_hosts ?

  • In your last question do you mean "call target_hosts from a Ping instance like p = Ping(); p.target_hosts?" <instance>.<attribute> is different than <class>.<attribute> -- both are valid, but very different. – jedwards Nov 11 '17 at 18:29
  • There is a difference between object instance and a class... Please read some more of that. s is an instance of class Scan. You initiated it by s = Scan(). You can use Scan class as a singleton object too, but without relying on init method . – Peter Majko Nov 11 '17 at 18:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

What might be making this hard to understand is that it's an odd example. In your example, the correct input for the hosts parameter that is needed to make an instance of Ping needs to come from a property only accessible from an instance of Ping (or its parent Scan).

Any method (or property) that has self as a parameter relies on a specific instance of that class which needs to be created first. If there was a staticmethod or classmethod they would be callable directly from the class.

You can only get and set target_hosts from a specific instance of the class (in this case either Scan or Ping). If you call Scan.target_hosts or Ping.target_hosts, it will return something like <property at 0x51cd188>. This is basically returning an unusable function from the class. It's saying, "The class dictionary contains instructions here on how to return some useful stuff from AN INSTANCE of <class>."

If you make an instance of Ping or Scan, you now have access to your target_hosts property.

>>> scan = Scan()
>>> scan.target_hosts = 'host1, host2, host3'
>>> scan.target_hosts
'host1 host2 host3'
>>> ping = Ping('stuff', 'nonsense')
>>> ping.hosts
'nonsense'
>>> ping.target_hosts = 'host4, host5, host6'
>>> ping.target_hosts
'host4 host5 host6'

You could run your script with a dummy Ping instance. This should work.

from models.scan import Scan
from models.ping import Ping

dummy = Ping('ignore', 'this')
hosts = "192.168.0.0/24"
dummy.target_hosts = hosts
pinger = Ping(ping_string, dummy.target_hosts)

Or, if Scan had a staticmethod, Ping could use it as well.

class Scan(object):
    """ Super class for scans """
    identifier = str(random.getrandbits(128))
    timestamp = int(time.time())
    results_dir = "/tmp/{}/".format(identifier)
    total_hosts = 0

    def __init__(self, target_hosts=None, target_ports=None):
        self.__target_hosts = target_hosts
        self.__target_ports = target_ports
        self.scan_string = "-sT -O --script auth,vuln"

    @staticmethod
    def prep_hosts(hosts):
        return  hosts.replace(", ", " ")

    ...

and then

from models.scan import Scan
from models.ping import Ping

hosts = "192.168.0.0/24"
input_hosts = Ping.prep_hosts(hosts)  # or Scan.prep_hosts(hosts)
pinger = Ping(ping_string, input_hosts)

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